Jump to content
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'michelle'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Spring 2019 Issue
    • Winter 2019 Issue
    • Autumn 2018 Issue
    • Summer 2018 Issue
    • Spring 2018 Issue
    • Winter 2018 Issue
    • Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Summer 2017 Issue
    • Spring 2017 Issue
    • Winter 2017 Issue
    • Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Summer 2016 Issue
    • Spring 2016 Issue
    • Winter 2016 Issue
    • Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Summer 2015 Issue
    • Spring 2015 Issue
    • Winter 2015 Issue
    • Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Summer 2014 Issue
    • Spring 2014 Issue
    • Winter 2014 Issue
    • Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Summer 2013 Issue
    • Spring 2013 Issue
    • Winter 2013 Issue
    • Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Summer 2012 Issue
    • Spring 2012 Issue
    • Winter 2012 Issue
    • Autumn 2011 Issue
    • Summer 2011 Issue
    • Spring 2011 Issue
    • Spring 2006 Issue
    • Summer 2005 Issue
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location


First Name


Last Name


City


State


Country


How did you hear about us?

Found 5 results

  1. This article originally appeared in the Autumn 2002 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free newsletter. At the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Program, women with celiac disease who have recently become pregnant often contact us. Remarkably, the questions we receive from these women seldom stray from one issue, that is, whether or not to maintain a gluten-free diet while pregnant. Most women mistakenly believe that the gluten-free diet will deprive their developing fetus with the nutrients it needs, and hurt the growing baby. In fact, for a pregnant woman with celiac disease, remaining ON the gluten-free diet is the best and only option for the health of mother and child. The gluten-free diet provides pregnant women and their babies with all of the nutrients they need to grow and be healthy. Fortunately, for all concerned, there have been excellent research studies on fertility, pregnancy and celiac disease conducted by top-notch investigators around the world. While this important research has mainly focused on women, it is important to note that researchers have established (since the 1950s) that men also suffer from infertility due to undiagnosed celiac disease. Celiac Disease and Fertility In research studies to date, the incidence of celiac disease in women with unexplained infertility has been estimated at four to eight percent. While a number of studies have demonstrated that unexplained infertility can be successfully treated with the gluten-free diet, others have shown that there are factors other than malabsorption of nutrients that result in infertility, delayed menarche (the start of the menstrual cycle) and early menopause. In two large case control studies, researchers examined the incidence of delayed menarche, amenorrhea (cessation of the menstrual cycle for short periods of time), and early menopause. Both studies enrolled women with celiac disease who were following the gluten-free diet or eating a gluten-containing diet. They found that women who were not on the gluten-free diet started their menstrual cycle up to a year and a half later than women with celiac disease who were following the diet. In addition, researchers found that up to 39% of women not on the diet experienced periods of amenorrhea, compared to only nine percent of women who were on the gluten-free diet. As you would expect, women with celiac disease who were not on the gluten-free diet were found to enter menopause four to five years earlier than women with celiac disease who were on the diet. Researchers who have studied women with infertility have found that they test positive for celiac disease-related antibodies at a rate that is ten-fold higher than the normal population. They have also demonstrated that women with infertility who are diagnosed with celiac disease do not always exhibit iron, B-12, or folate deficiencies, which points to other celiac disease-related explanations for the development of their infertility. Celiac Disease and Pregnancy Researchers have also studied the effect of the gluten-free diet in pregnant women with celiac disease, in order to determine any impact on the developing fetus and the pregnancy outcome. In a study of 25 patients and 60 pregnancies researchers found that 21% of women who were not on the gluten-free diet experienced pregnancy loss, and 16% of women experienced fetal growth restriction. Researchers also remarked, however, that successful pregnancies occurred before and after diagnoses for many women in the study. In a large Danish study with 211 infants and 127 mothers with celiac disease, researchers found that the mean birth weight of children born to mothers on a gluten-containing diet was significantly lower than babies born to mothers without celiac disease. Interestingly, this same study determined that women on the gluten-free diet gave birth to children weighing more than those born to mothers without celiac disease! In a case-control study that looked at the effect of the gluten-free diet on pregnancy and lactation, investigators learned that women with celiac disease who were not on the gluten-free diet experienced pregnancy loss at a rate of 17.8%, compared to 2.4% of women with celiac disease who were on the gluten-free diet. These researchers found that there was no difference in the occurrence of pregnancy and fertility problems in women with sub-clinical (positive blood test, negative biopsy) or clinical disease (positive blood test, positive biopsy). Finally, in a group of women with celiac disease who had been pregnant more than once, researchers looked at the effect of the gluten-free diet on their future pregnancies. They concluded that the institution of the gluten-free diet upon diagnosis caused a relative 35.6% drop in pregnancy loss, 29.4% drop in low-birth weight babies and an increase of two and a half months of breastfeeding. While the malabsorption of nutrients is not the only cause of fertility and pregnancy-related problems for women with celiac disease, the gluten-free diet is essential to improving the health of women and their babies.
  2. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2003 edition of Celiac.com's Scott-Free Newsletter. Refractory sprue. The specter of this condition is enough to cause fear in the hearts of many people living with celiac disease, yet this fear is based more on myth and misunderstanding than on medical science. For those who are concerned about their risk for developing refractory sprue, there is much that can be done. For those who have developed the condition, there are treatment options and new hope on the horizon. To begin, however, we must substitute fear with knowledge. What is refractory sprue? This question has been the subject of great scientific inquiry, and there are differing opinions on the relationship between celiac disease and refractory sprue. However, there are several general characteristics of refractory sprue that researchers seem to agree on: Presence of persistently damaged villi in the small intestine that are not repaired after the gluten free diet has been successfully initiated and/or maintained An increased presence of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) in the small bowel Severe malabsorption Researchers think of celiac disease as the beginning of a spectrum of conditions that could, for a small percentage of patients, end up at the other end to be enteropathy associated T-Cell Lymphoma. Most people with celiac disease will respond to the gluten free diet and never move to the next stage in this spectrum. But for those that do, they will experience changes in their immune system and in the cells lining their intestine that could lead to cancer. The spectrum would start with celiac disease, and the next step would be the non-responsiveness of the immune system to the gluten-free diet, in other words, refractory sprue. Then in some cases, a condition called ulcerative jejunitis develops, and finally, the damaged lining of the intestine produces cancer cells that mimic the mutations of the abnormal immune system cells. How many people with celiac disease are affected by refractory sprue? First, there are no reported cases in the medical literature of celiac sprue in people under 20 years of age. Second, the number of celiacs affected by refractory sprue, while not known, appears to be very small. We know this because the current estimates for small bowel cancers in people affected by celiac disease, as reported at the 10th International Conference on Celiac Disease is less than 2.5%. Refractory sprue can result in small bowel cancers, but not in all cases. It is interesting to note that in a recent study of patients with "unresponsive" celiac disease, Dr. Joseph Murray and his colleagues found that of 49 patients evaluated, only nine actually had refractory sprue—25 were found to have gluten contamination in their diets. The most common symptoms presented by the patients who truly had refractory sprue were weight loss, steatorrhea and diarrhea, in that order. What makes refractory sprue different than celiac sprue? Again, there are several medical points of view on this, but all researchers would agree that one marker indicates the presence of refractory sprue, and it is not found in celiac disease. Abnormal Intraepithelial Lymphocytes (Immune Cells) The intraepithelial lymphocytes found in celiac disease have a normal-looking appearance under the microscope and they behave like normal celiac immune cells (they respond to gluten when they shouldnt). These lymphocytes have the ability to communicate with other cells using different types of messages on their cell surfaces. When diagnosing celiac disease, pathologists look for an increased number of IELs as an indication of celiac disease. In refractory sprue, however, there is a different kind of IEL that is found in great numbers. This immune cell does not look normal, and it ignores the presence or absence of gluten. This type of cell does not have the ability to communicate normally with other cells as it would be expected to do. However, it does have the ability to communicate with cancer cells, contributing to their development. It is not clear what causes this type of IEL to develop or mutate, contributing to refractory sprue. It is possible to have refractory sprue without having these abnormal lymphocytes; in this case, treatment with steroids often results in response to the gluten free diet and a reversal of the condition. French researchers have developed a test to determine whether a biopsy specimen reflects a normal course of celiac disease with a slow response to the diet, or the need for further testing because refractory sprue may be present. In paraffin wax, a specimen can be stained to determine whether or not the immune cells express CD8, a protein often found on intraepithelial lymphocytes in celiac disease. If CD8 is positive, the individual has celiac and is responding very slowly to the diet. If the sample is CD8 negative, refractory sprue could be the reason. How is refractory sprue diagnosed and treated? It must be established through a thorough diet history and antibody testing that the individual is adhering to a strict gluten-free diet. Then, all other gastrointestinal diseases have to be ruled out before a diagnosis of refractory sprue is made. Conditions to be ruled out include pancreatic insufficiency, lactose malabsorption, parasite infestation, intolerance to other food proteins, coexisting inflammatory bowel disease, and autoimmune enteropathy, among others. Diagnosis should include a test called an enteroscopy, which is a procedure that explores more of the small intestine, and often finds ulcerative jejunitis, a marker of damage in refractory sprue. In addition, because the abnormal IELs can proliferate throughout the gut, a colonoscopy is recommended to determine if lymphocytic colitis is present. Treatment options include the elemental diet (also used in Crohns Disease), total parenteral nutrition (tube feedings), steroids, immunosuppressive therapies such as Cyclosporine, Infliximab, and in some cases, chemotherapy. Treatment options depend on the extent of refractory sprue found on biopsy and the nature of the clinical symptoms involved. How can I reduce the chances of developing refractory sprue? Researchers agree that most cases of refractory sprue develop in people who were diagnosed very late in life or who didnt follow the diet completely. Note that it doesn't matter how much gluten was consumed in these patients, they still developed refractory sprue. So the best protection against developing refractory sprue is to follow the diet. Be honest with yourself, especially if you cheat a little. What are you eating? Are you sure there isnt a great gluten-free alternative out there? Hey, there's even beer nowadays, so don't dismiss the suggestion of great gluten-free brownies, cakes, pies, pasta, crackers, cookies, or whatever else you are craving. Deal with your feelings too. Its easy to get angry about how life is much harder for people with celiac disease—how everything related to food requires too much planning, preparation, and explanation. These feelings are perfectly justified, but they do not justify cheating on your diet. There are great "quick fix" cookbooks out there, even convenience meals that are gluten free. Do whatever it takes to stay healthy, and gluten-free for life. Don't forget regular visits to your gastroenterologist or internist. Follow-up care for people with celiac disease is incredibly important, even if the medical community hasn't recognized it yet. Regular antibody testing to monitor compliance with the diet is an extra level of protection that every celiac needs. A simple anti-gliadin antibody test (IGG and IGA), six months post diagnosis, a year post-diagnosis and then every year after that for the first three years is key. In fact, the most serious celiac disease complications tend to occur in the first three years after diagnosis. Veteran celiacs should have their antibody levels checked every couple of years. While refractory sprue remains a potential complication for any adult with celiac disease, a majority of adult celiacs in this country will not have to face this difficult condition. For those diagnosed, treatment options continue to improve and the disease is becoming easier to manage. Researchers continue to study refractory sprue in order to better understand how the condition behaves and to develop new treatments. For now, the best defense against refractory sprue is a good offense—living a completely gluten-free life.
  3. This article originally appeared in the Summer 2002 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free newsletter. On June 2, 2002, hundreds of researchers traveled from all over the world to Paris, France, in order to hear the latest scientific reports on celiac disease research and to present results from their own investigations. Over the course of three days, scientists presented dozens of reports, and displayed over a hundred posters covering all aspects of celiac disease, from laboratory research on the microbiologic aspects of the disease, to quality of life issues in patients who are on the gluten-free diet. There were so many exciting reports presented at the conference, and the following describes the research findings from these new reports concerning the screening and clinical presentation of celiac disease, osteoporosis and osteopathy and neurological conditions. SCREENING ISSUES IN CELIAC DISEASE In order to understand how best to screen populations for celiac disease, it is important to know how celiac disease affects a portion of the population, and how it compares to similar populations in other countries. Mayo Clinic Retrospective Study Dr. Joseph Murray from the Mayo Clinic conducted a retrospective study on the population of people living in Olmsted County, Minnesota. This county has kept medical records on all of its residents for over 100 years. Dr. Murray looked at the medical records to determine which residents were diagnosed with celiac disease from 1950 to 2001. He found 82 cases of celiac disease, with 58 in females and 24 in males. The average age of diagnosis was 45. Pediatric diagnoses of celiac disease during this time period were extremely rare. Dr. Murray found that while the diagnosis rate of dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) remained constant over the 51 year period, the diagnosis rate of celiac disease increased from 0.8 to 9.4 per 100,000 people. He also noted that over time, adults with celiac disease were less likely to present diarrhea and weight loss as symptoms. Encouragingly, he determined that the average life expectancy for a diagnosed celiac in this community was no less than that of the normal population, despite the fact that celiac disease was often diagnosed later in life. What does this mean? The celiac disease diagnosis rate in this county is much lower than the actual incidence rates that have been reported in other studies; however, that rate has greatly increased over the past 51 years. It is also noteworthy that so few children were diagnosed with celiac disease. The analysis highlights interesting and useful information about the presentation of celiac disease in adults, and about the potential life expectancy for people with celiac disease who are diagnosed later in life. United States and Europe Compared Dr. Carlo Catassi of Ancona, Italy is currently a visiting researcher at the University of Maryland Celiac Research Center. He presented an analysis of the similarities and differences between the clinical presentations of celiac disease in the United States and Europe. Dr. Catassi established that the prevalence of celiac disease in the U.S. and Europe are the same and range between 0.5 to 1.0 percent of the general population. The prevalence in at-risk populations is much higher, ranging between 5 and 10 percent, and the prevalence in people with Type 1 Diabetes is approximately 5 percent in both the U.S. and Europe. He found that the typical (symptomatic) cases of celiac disease were less common in the U.S., and that the latent (asymptomatic) cases were much more common. Dr. Catassi stated that these differences could be due to genetic factors (for example, there are more Asians in the United States than in Europe), but are more likely due to environmental factors. He noted that infants born in the U.S. are often breastfed longer than their European counterparts. There is also a lower gluten intake in the first months of life for infants in the U.S. The timing of the introduction of cereals could help explain why many American children have somewhat milder symptoms and a more unusual presentation of the disease. What does this mean? Dr. Catassis analysis underscores the need to better educate physicians in the U.S. so that they learn to see typically atypical signs of celiac disease in children and adults. He also reinforced the importance of breastfeeding as a protective factor for children with a genetic predisposition to celiac disease, which could also improve the outlook for European children in the future. United States Prevalence Research Dr. Alessio Fasano presented a poster which outlined his recent findings that are a follow-up to his now famous 1996 blood screening study. The original study found that 1 in 250 Americans had celiac disease. It was performed using anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA), and when a blood sample tested AGA positive it was confirmed using anti-endomysial (EMA) antibody testing. Now that human tissue transglutaminase (tTG) testing is available, Dr. Fasano and his colleagues wanted to see if the results of their original study would be different using the tTG test. He and his colleagues tested the negative samples in the original study, and found 10 more positives using the tTG test. Two of these samples were confirmed positive when checked using the AGA antibody test. Dr. Fasano concluded that the original (1996) prevalence estimate of 1 in 250 understated the true prevalence rate, which could actually be greater than 1 in 200 Americans. Dr. Michelle Pietzak, a pediatric gastroenterologist at the University of California at Los Angeles, also presented a poster which described the prevalence of celiac disease in Southern California. In a study of 1,094 participants, Dr. Pietzak found that 8% of Hispanics tested positive for celiac disease. The most common symptoms presented by subjects in her study included abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, joint pain and chronic fatigue. What does this mean? It is important to understand that the foundation of all U.S. prevalence research on celiac disease began with the blood donor study performed by Dr. Fasano in 1996. His newly revised findings, which have been supported by at least one other major study, show that the prevalence of celiac disease in the U.S. population is much higher than originally believed, and that it could be greater than 1 in 200 people. Additionally, the California study is one of the first to establish a celiac disease prevalence figure for the Hispanic population in the U.S., and if the 8 percent figure is supported by further research it would indicate that celiac disease significantly affects Hispanic Americans. OSTEOPOROSIS AND OSTEOPATHY Dr. Julio Bai of Argentina presented important information on a condition that affects many people with celiac disease, and one that is often overlooked by physicians—osteoporosis or osteopathy (its milder form). Both children and adults with celiac disease can have low bone mineral density, and its method of treatment can have important consequences. Dr. Bai treats adults with bone loss, and has studied the nature of fractures and bone health in adults with celiac disease. In a case-control study of 78 celiac disease patients, Dr. Bai found that symptomatic patients were more likely to experience bone fractures than the normal population. Interestingly, he also found that patients with latent (asymptomatic) celiac disease had lower fracture rates than those with symptoms, and that the rate was equal to that of the normal population. None of the patients, however, experienced a fracture of the more serious type—in the hip, spine or shoulder, and the fractures tended to occur in their arms, legs, hands and feet. The doctor also discussed preliminary evidence which showed that most women with osteopathy and celiac disease who go on a gluten free diet will experience an improvement in bone density, while many men do not. There was, however, no difference found between the fracture rates of men and women. Dr. Bai also found that nutritional and metabolic deficiencies in patients with celiac disease and osteopathy might also contribute to fractures by weakening the muscles that surround essential bones. He added that immunological factors could also enhance or inhibit bone rebuilding, and that there is a bone-specific tissue transglutaminase (tTG) that plays a role in this process. What does this mean? It was certainly good news to hear that most people with low bone density due to celiac disease can reverse the damaging process, and if celiac-related fractures do occur they tend to be of the less serious type. Additionally, it was interesting to learn just how important a role muscle health plays in preventing celiac-related fractures. Osteopathy in Children Dr. Mora, an Italian researcher, presented data on osteopathy in children with celiac disease. His results indicate that a gluten-free diet can improve bone mass, and the effect is maintained even after 10 years. He also added that a gluten-free diet improved the overall bone metabolism of the children, and that the diet alone could cure their osteopathy. Osteopenia and Osteoporosis: Conditions Related to Celiac Disease In a chart prepared by Dr. David Sanders of the United Kingdom, data on 674 patients, 243 with osteoporosis and 431 with osteopenia, were presented. He found 10 cases of celiac disease among a mostly female population that had an average age of 53. In all ten cases, patients either had a history of iron-deficient anemia or gastrointestinal symptoms. He concluded that all patients with osteopenia or osteoporosis and a history of anemia or gastrointestinal symptoms should be screened for celiac disease. What does this mean? Dr. Sanders has identified a subset of people with osteoporosis and osteopenia that should be screened for celiac disease—those who have been anemic or have gastrointestinal symptoms. This helps physicians know when to refer patients for celiac disease screening. NEUROLOGICAL SYMPTOMS Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou of the United Kingdom presented data on neurological symptoms and gluten sensitivity. In an eight-year study, Dr. Hadjivassiliou screened people who had neurological symptoms of unknown origin using the anti-gliadin antibody (AGA) test. He found that 57 percent of these patients had antibodies present in their blood, compared to 12 percent of healthy controls or 5 percent of patients with a neurological condition of known origin. From this group, he studied 158 patients with gluten sensitivity and neurological conditions of unknown origin (only 33 percent of these patients had any gastrointestinal symptoms). The most common neurological conditions in this group were ataxia, peripheral neuropathies, myopathy, and encephalopathy (very severe headache). Less common were stiff person syndrome, myelopathy and neuromyotonia. He noted that ataxia is not a result of vitamin deficiencies, but is instead an immune-mediated condition. Patients with ataxia have unique antibodies that are not found in patients with celiac disease. Dr. Hadjivassiliou felt that up to 30 percent of idiopathic neuropathies could be gluten-related, and that there is preliminary evidence which indicates that a gluten-free diet is helpful in cases of neuropathy and ataxia. What does this mean? It is interesting to note that Dr. Hadjivassiliou has studied gluten sensitivity and not celiac disease. The test used in this study is not specific enough to identify people who were likely to have celiac disease. However, his finding that the gluten-free diet may be helpful in people with certain types of neuropathy and ataxia opens the door for further research on these conditions in people with celiac disease.
  4. This article appeared in the Spring 2007 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free Newsletter. Celiac.com 08/29/2007 - The XII International Celiac Disease Symposium, proudly hosted by the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University, featured presentations from researchers from all over the globe. The last session of the scientific portion of the symposium, entitled “Non-Dietary Therapies”, was full of controversy and fireworks. Talks given by Drs. Khosla, Gray, Paterson, Anderson and Mitea all revealed that potential alternatives to the gluten free diet are now being aggressively pursued. Several groups have even spun off from pharmaceutical companies to raise funds to test these alternatives in patient trials. However, several questions remain. How close are we to a “pill” or “vaccine” to treat or prevent celiac disease? And do we even need, or more importantly, WANT them, given that the diet is safe and effective? Any alternative therapy for celiac disease must be at least as safe as the gluten-free diet, which, if done correctly, has NO side-effects. So the bar is raised very high. An alternative must offer great medical benefit to celiac patients without causing any medical harm. It is also unclear how, exactly, these new therapies will be implemented. Can they treat existing celiac disease? Will they prevent those at increased risk for the disease (such as siblings) from having symptoms? Will these medications allow celiac patients to ingest as much gluten as they want, or will they just take away the fear of contamination when eating questionable foods? What follows is a summary of several important points raised by some of these speakers in regard to the research that their center is doing in this area of “alternative therapies for celiac disease. Two groups discussed their research on what has commonly become known as “the celiac pill”. The idea behind the “pill” is somewhat similar to the idea of taking a lactase enzyme supplement to digest the milk sugar lactose (if you are lactose intolerant). However, digesting the proteins that trigger the immune reaction in celiac disease is much more complex than digesting the simple sugar found in dairy products. The small fragments of the gluten proteins from wheat, rye and barley, which stimulate the immune system in someone with celiac disease, contain a large quantity of an amino acid called proline. The stomach and pancreatic enzymes in humans have difficulty digesting the fractions where these prolines are located, making the gluten highly resistant to complete digestion. The idea behind the “celiac pill” is to provide enzymes to break down the gluten into smaller fragments which will not be recognized by a celiac patient’s immune system. Therefore, theoretically, gluten would not cause an immune reaction and could be safely eaten. Dr. Gary Gray, an adult gastroenterologist working at Stanford University in California, addressed this issue in his presentation “Oral Enzyme Therapy”. Their study looked at 20 biopsy-proven celiacs in remission (without symptoms) who received orange juice with either gluten or gluten pre-treated with a special enzyme (abbreviated PEP, for prolyl endopeptidase). Each patient consumed a low dose of gluten daily, 5 grams, which is equivalent to one slice of bread. The patients completed a daily symptom questionnaire, and had urine and stool tests of to measure intestinal damage. The researchers concluded that pretreatment of gluten with PEP avoided the development of fat or carbohydrate malabsorption in the majority of those patients who, after a 2-week gluten challenge, developed fat or carbohydrate malabsorption. The PEP enzyme needs to be investigated further in larger trials of celiac patients. Cristina Mitea, working with Dr. Fritz Koning at Leiden University in The Netherlands, also presented some data using similar technology, entitled “Enzymatic degradation of gluten in a GI-tract model”. This group published in 2006 that the above described PEP enzyme may not work optimally in the celiac patient, since it is not active at low stomach pH. The PEP enzyme may also be broken down by pepsin, a digestive enzyme in the stomach, before it reaches the small bowel where gluten causes the most damage. Given these facts, this group of researchers characterized a prolyl endoprotease enzyme, derived from the fungus Aspergillus niger, abbreviated AN-PEP. The AN-PEP enzyme, according to some publications, has been shown to work at stomach pH while resisting pepsin digestion. In the lab, the AN-PEP was able to degrade intact gluten as well as small fragments of gluten, including those that stimulate the immune system in patients with celiac disease. It also appeared to act within minutes, which is 60 times faster than PEP. This is particularly important, as ingested gluten will leave the stomach to enter the small bowel within 1 to 4 hours after being eaten. These researchers state that this enzyme is very stable, and could be produced at low cost at food-grade quality in an industrial setting. However, it has not yet been tested in human clinical studies. In summary, some of these future potential treatments include: The development of genetically detoxified grains Oral or intranasal celiac vaccines to induce tolerance Inhibitors to the effects of zonulin on intestinal permeability Detoxification of immunogenic gliadin peptides (or gluten proteolysis) via oral peptidase supplementation Inhibitors of tissue transglutaminase Dr. Michelle Pietzak, “The Gluten Free MD” is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine. She sees patients at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles and Los Angeles County Women’s and Children’s Hospital. With New Era Productions, she has recently released an audio celiac disease set as well as a 2 disc DVD set about celiac disease and the gluten free diet, available at www.glutenfreemd.com.
  5. Celiac.com 07/02/2002 (Summary prepared 06/05/2002) - I'm here at the 10th International Celiac Disease Research Conference, in Paris, and three days of intense meetings and reports have just concluded. I didn't want to wait to share with you some of the most interesting and exciting developments in celiac disease--so I'm in a cyber cafe in Paris sending this e-mail. First of all, many of you know that there are two main types of medical research--work that is done in a laboratory, with test tubes and equipment, and research that is done using human participants, called clinical research. There were many presentations on laboratory research at this meeting, which is a subject that tends to be pretty complicated (for me at least!). Laboratory Research Presentations: Many of the presentations on this area of research were focused on answering the following question, so neatly outlined by Dr. Fasano: How do environmental factors (like gluten) reach the immune system (which is primed by genetic predisposition) to cause a response (the development of disease)? The wall of the intestine is designed to prevent this from happening, he said. There are many theories as to why this occurs. Some theorized that gluten actually penetrates epithelial cells (they are the ones that line the intestine) and come out the other side. Other researchers showed evidence that the bonds between epithelial cells break down and opens a pathway for gluten to enter the intestine. Interestingly, another researcher, Dr. Bana Jabri from Princeton has focused her research on the role of immune killer cells that are activated in celiac disease, and gliadin does not have to be present for them to react and create celiac disease! Several researchers discussed the toxic areas of the gliadin protein, and how they are activated in the presence of immune molecules like IL 15. One interesting but complicated note--in a study of numerous patients (using biopsy samples) all of the intestinal samples recognized different toxic fragments of gluten--meaning that there are dozens of ways that celiac disease can develop at the cellular level. These researchers are studying the earliest events in the body that may lead to celiac disease. It is hoped that if we can better explain the series of events (like a row of dominos that fall, one at a time) we can develop treatments to stop these events and prevent celiac disease. Did you know there was more than one kind of tTG (tissue Transglutaminase)?...I didn't! There is an epidermal transglutaminase that is present in dermatitis herpetiformis...this difference may indicate why people with DH are much more sensitive to gluten than those with celiac disease. Clinical Research and Screening Studies: Dr. Joe Murray presented a retrospective analysis of the incidence of celiac disease in the county that includes Rochester, Minnesota and the Mayo Clinic. In his analysis, which goes back decades, he found that the average age of diagnosis is 45-64, and the incidence of celiac disease was more common in women by 3 to 1. He found that celiac disease was more common in this county than ulcerative colitis and more common than Type1 diabetes. Dr. Carlo Catassi, currently in residence at the Center for Celiac Disease Research in Baltimore but native to Italy, presented an overview of the differences between celiacs in the United States and Europe. Some interesting and not surprising information--Europeans are diagnosed younger as adults (34 years of age) when compared to Americans. In Europe, children are diagnosed on average by the age of 4, while many American children are school-age by the time they reach a diagnosis. Surprisingly, Catassi reported that US celiacs tend to have more diarrhea than their European counterparts. Catassi also reported that Europeans have more atypical forms of celiac disease than Americans. He presented the celiac disease screening prevalence figures for the US: 2,121,212 people are projected to have celiac disease in America. There are 140 unknown celiacs for every diagnosed celiac in the US. Dr. Michele Pietzak, in California, did a prevalence study of at-risk conditions in children and found that 14% of children with iron-deficiency anemia had celiac disease. A group in Salt Lake found that 10% of children with Downs Syndrome had celiac disease, and the Childrens Hospital of Milwaukee found that 7% of children with type 1 diabetes have celiac disease. This is a strong case for screening all children with these conditions. Speaking in reference to children, Dr. Catassi said that weaning practices in the US and other countries are having a bigger role in the development of celiac disease than previously thought. Osteopathy: a South American researcher has looked at the issue of fractures in people with silent celiac disease as compared to people with symptomatic celiac disease. He found that people who had symptomatic celiac disease were more likely to suffer fractures than those with silent celiac disease. In all cases, the fractures were less severe in nature. More confirmation with regard to bone mass deficiency in children-the gluten-free diet alone will repair the deficit, and there is generally no need for other medical interventions. Another area of research concerned gluten-related ataxia (a complicated condition that I dont fully know how to describe, but includes muscle weakness and confusion). Overall, it was reported that 6-10% of celiac patients may develop neurological problems (of which gluten-related ataxia is only one). This is another case where celiacs with ataxia may produce different antibodies (like in DH) which lead to the development of ataxia. Most importantly, ataxia does not develop as a result of a nutrient deficiency. There was a great deal of information presented about autoimmune disorders, and I want to make sure I get it right, so Ill summarize that section more in detail (along with other topics) when I return to the office. However, one interesting item related to children with celiac disease and their risk for developing autoimmune disorders was presented: In a study of 74 children diagnosed with celiac disease before the age of 5, Italian researchers found that after 10 years, their risk of developing autoimmune disorders was no greater than that of the general population. Yet another reason for early intervention! Another important area of research presented was in the area of refractory sprue and the development of lymphomas. Im also going to give this area a bit more thought before I post anything, but I will reassure everyone that the risk of lymphomas is very rare. One more thing: I apologize for the incompleteness of my e-mail if any researcher or physician finds that I have not best described their work--I'm summarizing my notes after a very long three days of meetings and my brain cells may be a bit dysfunctional. I will clarify any information and send abstracts to anyone who would like them, just send me your snail mail address. Au Revoir!
×
×
  • Create New...