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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/27/2016 - With her gluten-free bakery "Jennifer's Way" facing a $43 million lawsuit from investors, including her own husband, British model Louis Dowler, former "Blue Bloods" star Jennifer Esposito has reportedly skipped town for an "undetermined amount of time" in Denmark. Esposito's investment partners filed their suit in March, alledging, among other things, that Esposito's bakery is failing, and that she redirected the company's website to her personal blog and told consumers the products couldn't be trusted. "Esposito has instilled and promoted a groundless and downright false sense of fear that the very same products with the same recipes, coming from the same facility, that she once stood behind, are now unsafe to consume," the lawsuit reads. Esposito was previously married to actor Bradley Cooper and engaged two more times before she married Dowler in 2014. In addition to the suit, she is now also in the process of divorcing Dowler, who is, as noted above, one of the investment partners who brought the suit against her. Esposito made headlines in 2012, when she was put on indefinite leave from the CBS show "Blue Bloods" after informing the network of her celiac disease diagnosis. According to Esposito's tweets: "CBS. . . PUT me on unpaid leave and has blocked me from working anywhere else after my doc said u needed a reduced schedule due to celiac." According to a statement by CBS, "Jennifer has informed us that she is only available to work on a very limited part-time schedule. As a result, she's unable to perform the demands of her role and we regretfully had to put her character on a leave of absence . . . We hope that she will be able to return at some point in the future." Read more at Fox News.
  2. Celiac.com 12/16/2014 - Will people with celiac disease spend money on drugs designed to reduce or eliminate adverse reactions to gluten? Drug researchers and investors are betting they will. Currently, the only proven treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet. However, a number of companies are looking to debut drugs for treating celiac disease in the next five years, With that in mind, Abhilok Garg, Ph.D., an immunology analyst with research and consulting firm GlobalData, is projecting sales such drugs in the US and five major European markets Germany, France, Spain, Italy and the UK, to reach approximately $551.1 million by 2023. The launches of Alba/Teva’s larazotide acetate, Alvine/AbbVie’s latiglutenase, and BioLineRX’s BL-7010 portend a new world of therapies for the estimated 600,000 diagnosed celiac patients in these countries. With early trials looking promising and no obvious problems on the horizon, analysts expect larazotide acetate to enter the US and 5EU markets in Q1 2018 and Q1 2019, respectively, followed by latiglutenase in Q1 2019 and Q1 2020. Latiglutenase is currently being developed as a chronic drug treatment, GlobalData’s interviews with KOLs have indicated that clinical experience with this drug could dictate the way it is prescribed to patients, and that it may in some cases be used as an “on demand” treatment,” says Dr. Garg. Larazotide acetate works by modulating tight junctions (TJs) in the small bowel epithelium, and has tried to maximize recent research showing that people with celiac disease do have altered intracellular spaces and TJ structures in the lower esophagus. BL-7010 works by sequestering gliadins, effectively masking them from enzymatic degradation and preventing the formation of immunogenic peptides that trigger an adverse immune reaction when people with celiac disease consume wheat. BL-7010 has cleared early trial hurdles and been found to be safe and well tolerated in both single and repeated-dose administrations. Does the idea of a reliable treatment for celiac disease appeal to you? Would you try such drugs, or just stick with the gluten-free diet? Source: Pharmabiz.com
  3. Celiac.com 11/13/2014 - An anonymous donor has made a $2 million dollar contribution to the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA). The donation is the largest in the organization's history, and will support the NFCA’s mission is to raise celiac disease awareness, promote research and testing testing, and improve the quality of life for celiacs eating a gluten-free diet. Since 2003, the NFCA has worked to promote celiac disease research and awareness. The grant will help to ensure support for the NFCA as it looks to increase research and awareness into the future. Stay tuned for updates on how the NFCA supplements or expands its ongoing efforts on behalf of people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance.
  4. Celiac.com 11/22/2010 - A $45 million donation to University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research will be used to create a first-of-its-kind institute to find new treatments, and perhaps a cure, for celiac disease. The donation comes at the behest of the family of a grateful patient from Indiana, Shelia Cafferty. The institute made possible by the donation could eventually employ up to 200 doctors and researchers who will not only study celiac disease, but use it as a model to better understand other associated autoimmune disorders, including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Dr. Alessio Fasano, Director of the Center for Celiac Research announced the donation at a press conference at West Baltimore's University of Maryland BioPark. Speaking about the donation, Fasano told interviewers that raising "enough money is always a problem" for celiac research, and that what has been needed "for a major breakthrough is thinking out of the box, and this will allow us to do just that." In some ways, Cafferty's nutritional health battle is similar to that fought by many people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance. She suffered nine years of debilitating gastrointestinal symptoms and rashes before she began to suspect wheat a few years ago. Cafferty, a nurse, put herself on a gluten-free diet, which provided relief, but not all of the answers. She continued to visit doctors looking for answers. About a year ago, Cafferty's determined husband tracked down Dr. Fasano, who was able to diagnose her gluten sensitivity. Fasano's diagnosis provided tremendous relief for the Caffertys, and left them with a resolve to help save others from going through similar suffering. "There are a lot of people like me, not getting answers," she said by phone from Indiana. She was unable to make the announcement with her husband Ken. "When you don't feel good, it impacts your activity and your daily living." As a result of their gratitude and resolve, Sue Cafferty and her husband Ken gave $5 million to Fasano's center and arranged for the donation of another $40 million from a foundation with which they are affiliated, but which declined to be named. Ken Cafferty said he and his wife want their money to raise the public's and doctors' awareness, as well as to fund research into treatments and a cure for celiac disease and other autoimmune disorders. "It's heartbreaking to see someone you love suffer," he said. During the press conference, Dr. Jay Perman, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore, said he expected the celiac center to collaborate with numerous researchers across, and that research done "using the Cafferty's funds will...enable research to result in real solutions for patients and their families."
  5. Celiac.com 09/29/2006 - Alvine Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company focused on developing pharmaceutical products for the treatment of celiac sprue, today announced the closing of a $21 million Series A financing. Sofinnova Ventures led the investment round with strong support from Prospect Venture Partners and InterWest Partners. Cargill Ventures and Flagship Ventures also participated in the financing. "This financing brings together a premier group of investors committed to advancing the companys lead product candidate ALV001 into human clinical and safety trials," said Stanford Professor Chaitan Khosla, Ph.D., who co-founded the company. "Celiac sprue is a serious yet common immune disease that is triggered by gluten, a component of cereal grains found in most foods sold in the U.S. While under-diagnosed, as many as one in one hundred individuals suffer from celiac sprue, yet there is no drug therapy available. Alvines mission is to provide innovative drug therapies for this disease and to change the lives of its many patients," he continued. "Sofinnova has known Chaitan since the early 90s when we worked together on behalf of Kosan Biosciences. Were thrilled to be working with him again on his current venture," commented Sofinnova Ventures General Partner Nicola Campbell, Ph.D. "Alvines lead products will be beneficial to the celiac market for the treatment of a neglected patient population. ALV001 has proven to be uniquely safe for patients with celiac sprue, an actuality that the management team and investors alike are proud of." Joining Khosla in this venture are Alvine co-founders Blair Stewart, President and Kevin Kaster, Vice President of Corporate Development. Alvines platform is based on over six years of research, and an extensive intellectual property portfolio licensed from Stanford University and acquired from the Celiac Sprue Research Foundation. The Alvine Board of Directors consists of: Nicola Campbell, Ph.D., General Partner, Sofinnova Ventures; Ilan Zipkin, Ph.D., Partner, Prospect Venture Partners; Nina Kjellson, Partner, InterWest Partners; and Chaitan Khosla, Wells H. Rauser and Harold M. Petiprin Professor in the School of Engineering; Professor of Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, and Biochemistry, by courtesy, of Stanford University. About Alvine: Alvine Pharmaceuticals, Inc., is a Palo Alto-based biopharmaceutical company dedicated to developing and commercializing therapeutics for the treatment of Celiac sprue. Alvines lead molecule, ALV001, is a protease designed to be consumed with food to detoxify the gluten that triggers the autoimmune response in celiac patients. Celiac sprue is believed to affect as many as two million people in the United States alone, many of whom have suffered the symptoms of the disease but have not yet been diagnosed.