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Found 4 results

  1. Celiac.com 02/14/2018 - If you have celiac disease, and follow a gluten-free diet by medical necessity, you would likely never regard avoiding gluten as particularly sexy or attractive. Well, you would be wrong. Gluten-free eaters are getting more dates, more sex, and more orgasms, than their non-gluten-free counterparts, according to the online dating site Match.com. Results from the company's annual Singles in America survey indicate that gluten-free eaters are more than twice as likely to go on a date, and more than one-and-a-half times less likely to have a dating dry spell lasting two or more years. And when it comes to orgasms, well, of the 5,000 people who responded to the survey, those reporting orgasms are 43 percent more likely to be gluten-free. So, there you have it. Gluten-free is officially sexy. Still, exactly what might make gluten-free people sexier and more attractive than gluten eaters, your guess is as good as ours. We'll be happy to hear your thoughts in our comments section below. The survey also provided some interesting information on people's willingness to have sex with robots, and on their views about whether surreptitious robot sex constitutes cheating. Guys were twice as likely to be up for robot sex, but both men and women agree that hitting the robot on the side would be cheating. Read more at: SFGate.com
  2. Celiac.com 08/15/2017 - Some evidence indicates that rates of celiac disease in the general population are increasing over time. Prior to the discovery of gluten's role in celiac disease, the prognosis for celiac sufferers was bleak. Did higher betas of death keep celiac disease rates correspondingly lower? To provide an answer, a team of researchers set out to examine a possible relationship between mortality rates for children under five, and prevalence rates of celiac disease. The research team included Federico Biagi; Alberto Raiteri; Annalisa Schiepatti; Catherine Klersy; and Gino R. Corazza. Their team conducted a review of literature, and found 27 studies done in 17 different countries between 1995 and 2011 describing rates of celiac disease in schoolchildren. Four of the studies were conducted in Italy. Their meta-analysis compared prevalence rates between specific-country under-five mortality groups, publication year and age. In recent decades, mortality rates for under-five year olds have been decreasing all over the world. This reduction is paralleled by rising rates of celiac disease. The Spearman correlation coefficient for these terms was -63%, 95%CI -82% to -33% (p < 0.001). So, the higher the mortality rate, the lower the prevalence of celiac disease. This finding is confirmed by the meta-analysis of the 4 studies conducted in Italy over time. The mortality rate for under five-year-olds seems to influence the rate of celiac disease in the general population. They predict a rise, in the near future, of the number of celiac disease patients, due to better survival rates of celiac children. Source: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition: Post Acceptance: July 27, 2017. doi: 10.1097/MPG.0000000000001696
  3. Celiac.com 03/29/2017 - The March news regarding new gluten-free eateries shows that the most impactful news coming out of US colleges is about more than just basketball. The gluten-free eating scene at US colleges is enjoying a surge of popularity, as more schools are catering to the dietary needs of students with food allergies and sensitivities with dedicated facilities and inspired food offerings. With the recent reopening of Risley Dining hall, Cornell University welcomes the second certified gluten-free college eatery in the U.S., following Kent State. After working for two years to remove gluten from their dining hall menu, slowly adding items like rice noodles, gluten-free biscuits and brownies, Cornell's main eatery is now certified 100% gluten-free, peanut free, and tree-nut free. University of South Carolina recently debuted not one, but two new campus eateries for students, staff and visitors looking for gluten-free dining. Campus staple, Naturally Woodstock, now offers exclusively gluten-free food options, while Plan-It-Healthy also offers an entirely gluten-free menu. Meanwhile, Tulane University's Bruff Commons dining hall debuted a new, dedicated food prep station that serves fresh allergen-free food. Called Simple Servings by Sodexo, the allergen-free serving line features two fresh meals twice a day — usually a meat with a vegetable and a gluten-free carbohydrate, said company dietitian Kelsey Rosenbaum. The eateries at University of South Carolina and Tulane are working with Sodexo, a quality of life services company to provide gluten-free food services. Sodexo says that Tulane's cafeteria is the first allergen-free fresh food option at a Louisiana university. As more and more colleges emulate the success of programs such as these, look for gluten-free, allergen-free options to become the norm, rather than the exception. Read more: theadvocate.com 14850.com satprnews.com
  4. Celiac.com 01/20/2017 - A team of researchers recently investigated trends in the prevalence of diagnosed celiac disease, undiagnosed celiac disease, and people without celiac disease avoiding gluten (PWAG) in the civilian non-institutionalized US population from 2009 to 2014. The research team included Rok Seon Choung, MD, PhD, Aynur Unalp-Arida, MD, PhD, Constance E. Ruhl, MD, PhD, Tricia L. Brantner, BS, James E. Everhart, MD, and Joseph A. Murray, MD. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; the Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD; Social & Scientific Systems, Inc., Silver Spring, MD; and with the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. Their team studied the occurrence of celiac disease and PWAG in the 2009 to 2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. They tested serum of all participants aged 6 years or older from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys from 2009 to 2014 for celiac disease serology at Mayo Clinic. They also interviewed participants for a diagnosis of celiac disease, and the use of a gluten-free diet (GFD). They incorporated the design effects of the survey and sample weights into all statistical analyses. Results They found that, in the US general population, rates of celiac disease did not change significantly from 0.7% (95% CI, 0.6%-0.8%) in 2009 to 2010 to 0.8% (95% CI, 0.4%-1.2%) in 2011 to 2012 to 0.7% (95% CI, 0.3%-1.0%) in 2013 to 2014. However, rates of undiagnosed celiac disease decreased from 0.6% in 2009 to 2010 to 0.3% in 2013 to 2014. In contrast, the prevalence of PWAG increased significantly from 0.5% (95% CI, 0.2%-0.9%) in 2009 to 2010 to 1.0% (95% CI, 0.6%-1.4%) in 2011 to 2012 to 1.7% (95% CI, 1.1%-2.4%) in 2013 to 2014 (P=.005 for trend). Their data shows that, even though rates of celiac disease remained largely stable from 2009 to 2014, the percentage of individuals with hidden celiac disease decreased substantially. Moreover, the proportion of individuals who follow a gluten-free diet without celiac disease rose sharply during that period. Long-term health consequences of a GFD warrant further investigation. Source: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocp.2016.10.012
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