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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/25/2019 - Some researchers have suspected that myelin proteins may be involved in multiple sclerosis (MS). A recent report in Science and Translational Medicine, suggests that additional non-myelin-related protein may also play a role. Researchers examined protein samples from the brains of 31 people who had died from suspected or confirmed MS. They found that T cells from 12 people reacted to the enzyme guanosine diphosphate-L-fucose synthase, or GDP-L-fucose-synthase. The enzyme usually helps to process sugars that are crucial to cell function and communication, including the function and communication of neurons. Researcher Dr Roland Martin, from the University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland, has helped to figure out which myelin proteins and peptides come under attack in MS, and which cells and immune molecules do the attacking. Paper coauthor Mireia Sospedra, of University Hospital of Zurich, suggests that “other auto-antigens might be involved in initiating the disease." She believes that the attack on this newly identified auto-antigen triggers tissue damage that exposes other myelin proteins that are likely targets for attack. Sospedra suspects that some variations in myelin protein structure might be susceptible to immune attack, and that genetic variation in immune cells might influence the body’s response to a given infection. She suggests that the offending antigens may differ between individuals, as the structure of our molecular machinery is genetically determined. Northwestern University immunology professor Stephen Miller, who did not work on this research, but has worked with Dr. Martin in the past, suggests that there’s likely not just “one particular virus or bacteria or environmental factor that triggers MS in every patient. There are probably many things that can trigger an autoimmune reaction against a particular infection," he says. "But the more antigens we identify that can contribute to the disease, the better." Researchers have pointed out that numerous autoimmune diseases seem to cluster in certain gene sequences. Multiple gene areas seem to correlate with numerous autoimmune conditions. Prior comprehensive genetic association studies have found 90 genetic areas associated with T1DM, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and/or rheumatoid arthritis. Celiac disease and MS sufferers share some things in common, including a tendency to develop rosacea. Rosacea is a common inflammatory skin condition that shares the same genetic risk location as autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease. The connections between multiple sclerosis and celiac disease is a common topic of discussions on many forums. Read more at: medscape.com
  2. I’ve been gluten free now for eight years. I have had two separate biopsies confirming celiac disease. I’ve had scopes since diagnosis that showed regrowth of microvilli. The diet has worked and I gained back all the weight that I lost before diagnosis. Lately, I’ve had some alarming symptoms. I’m having trouble making certain expressions with my face, I have a very hard time finding words or pronouncing words. I’ve had loss of feeling in my hands And numbness in tingling. I also get strangled very easily when I’m drinking or eating. I’m experiencing a trimmer in my right hand particularly although I’ve never had a very steady hand. The doctor checked all my vitamins etc. and put me on vitamin D months ago, but other than that everything has been fine as far as blood work. I have not changed anything. Just wondering if any of you have experience this and if you found out what caused it.
  3. Celiac.com 08/30/2017 - The human gut is home to a huge and diverse number of microorganisms that perform various biological roles. Disturbances in a healthy gut microbiome might help to trigger various inflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Human gut-derived commensal bacteria suppress CNS inflammatory and demyelinating disease. Can they improve the treatment of multiple Sclerosis (MS)? A team of researchers recently set out to evaluate evidence that gut commensals may be used to regulate a systemic immune response and may, therefore, have a possible role in treatment strategies for multiple Sclerosis. The research team included Ashutosh Mangalam, Shailesh K. Shahi, David Luckey, Melissa Karau, Eric Marietta, Ningling Luo, Rok Seon Choung, Josephine Ju, Ramakrishna Sompallae, Katherine Gibson-Corley, Robin Patel, Moses Rodriguez, Chella David, Veena Taneja, and Joseph Murray. In a recent article, the team reports on their identification of human gut-derived commensal bacteria, Prevotella histicola, which can suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II transgenic mouse model. P. histicola suppresses disease through the modulation of systemic immune reactions. P. histicola challenge caused a reduction in pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17 cells and an increase in CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells, tolerogenic dendritic cells, and suppressive macrophages. This study indicates that gut commensals may regulate a systemic immune response, and so may have a role in future treatments for multiple Sclerosis, and possibly other autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease. Source: Cell.com. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2017.07.031
  4. Hi I am new here. I am hoping someone can explain to me what's going on. Here is a brief history. In 2003 diagnosed with MS. In 2004 doctor said no I didn't have MS and took me off all my disease modifying drugs. In 2008 I was re diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. I was tested for celiac disease in 2007 and in 2013. Both times were negative. Also had a biopsy that also came back negative. Saw a new neurologist on Monday who said he didn't believe I have MS based on the fact that my lumbar puncture was negative in 2004. I do have many brain lesions that show on my MRI's. The only time the lesions increased was when I stopped the MS medication. How can the new neurologist say I have celiac disease and not MS especially when all my tests come back negative for celiac disease? Any help would be appreciated.
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