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Found 3 results

  1. Celiac.com 09/07/2016 - Sometimes individual medical cases that initially puzzle doctors can yield new revelations for doctors and patients, and sometimes point to new directions for inquiry. The case of a young woman whose serious heart problems led doctors to discover a that she suffered from celiac disease is just the latest example. The research team included Mariam Ghozzi, Chaima Mrizak, Taha Hasnaoui, Sonia Ernez, Maha Kacem, Asma Ommezzine, Laarbi Chaieb, Gouider Jridi, and Ibtissem Ghedira. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Cardiology, the Department of Endocrinology, and the Department of Immunology at Farhat Hached University Hospital in Sousse, Tunisia, with the Department of Biochemistry at Sahloul University Hospital in Sousse, Tunisia, and with the Research Unit (03/UR/07-02) of the Faculty of Pharmacy at Monastir University in Tunisia. The 18-year-old girl was admitted for tachycardia and dyspnea of effort stage II of NYHA. Her medical history revealed a stroke four months prior, along with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes since the age of 10 years. Physical examination showed a short stature, pallor, muscular atrophy and delayed puberty, but no diabetic neuropathy. By interviewing the patient, doctors found that she had shown signs of celiac disease since early infancy, and secondary amenorrhea for two years. Ophtalmological examination showed no diabetic retinopathy. Echocardiography showed the presence of a big thrombus, hypokinesis and dilated cardiomyopathy with a low rate of left ventricular ejection fraction at 20%. Laboratory tests revealed a high level of B-type natriuretic peptide, anemia, vitamin D deficiency, hypocholesterolemia and low level of high density lipoprotein (HDL). Microalbuminuria was negative. All serological markers of celiac disease were highly positive. The patient was put on gluten-free diet and she received a re-synchronization cardiac therapy. We emphasize that celiac disease and type 1 diabetes must be kept in mind in etiological diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. Source: Case Report Journal of Gastroenterology, Pancreatology & Liver Disorders
  2. Celiac.com 08/10/2014 - Gluten comes from the Latin word for glue. It is a protein in wheat and other grains. It will elicit an autoimmune response in celiacs. Other grains like barley, rye and spelt contain gluten as well. In wheat products, the difficult part for celiacs to digest is gliadin. Some fad diets may try to claim glaidin is new, but it is not, and to dispel another myth there isn’t any wheat on the market that is genetically modified. Celiac diease isn't diagnosed as often as it should be. In turn, individuals suffer with it for years, not knowing what to do or how to feel better. Celiac disease is often misdiagnosed for different ailments that have similar symptoms. It can seem to be mysterious, since often it takes time to find out what issue is causing the entire ruckus. There are several symptoms that overlap between celiac and other autoimmune disorders, like Type 1 diabetes, IBS, Crohn's and Hashimoto Thyroiditis. Celiac disease and other autoimmune disorders are known to have neurological effects that sometimes result in ataxia, numbness and pain, so Lupus, rheumatoid arthritis or similar disorders often get confused for celiac.To make it more confusing some autoimmune disorders can be triggered by untreated celiac disease. Celiac is a genetic disease that is not contagious, but it does medically require a gluten-free diet. An individual with celiac must be careful to read labels on all products they consume. They must be aware of co-mingling of food ingredients in preparation of their meals and must be diligent to not ingest a crumb of gluten! There are individuals that don't have the genetic makeup for celiac disease, but yet seem to be unable to digest gluten. Those individuals are considered gluten sensitive. There unfortunately are no tests or strict criteria to diagnose gluten sensitivity, according to a recent Webinar from National Foundation for Celiac Awareness. The gluten sensitivity issue is not yet as clearly defined as celiac disease. Some individuals with gluten sensitivity do have a problem digesting gluten, but it often is just not as severe as the gluten autoimmune reaction that happens to those with celiac disease. If you feel you may need a gluten-free diet, do not start one until you see a doctor who will likely recommend that you get screened for celiac disease. A celiac diagnosis begins with a blood test. If the test is positive then your doctor may direct you to a specialist for more testing, and after diagnosis send you to visit a Registered Dietitian or advise you to start a gluten-free Diet. Again, please do not start a gluten-free diet before your doctor does a test for celiac, it may make your test results inaccurate.
  3. Celiac.com 02/21/2011 - After reading this new book by celiac nurse specialist Shelly Stuart, RN, what shines through above all is her true understanding of the complex nature of gluten-related illnesses, and her heartfelt compassion for patients who suffer from them. Her book is extremely well researched and documented. As a registered nurse and celiac herself, Ms. Stuart is able to use her strong patient teaching experience to clearly educate the reader about even very complicated subjects. She provides excellent explanations of leaky gut and the pathophysiology of celiac disease, and she is one of the first clinicians to write in-depth about non-celiac gluten intolerance. Importantly, she makes the point that immune mediated reactions can and do occur in non-celiac gluten intolerance, and backs this up by citing clinical evidence. Another important point made concerns pancreatic insufficiency, which can accompany celiac disease, but few know that this condition can persist even after diagnosis and transition to a gluten-free diet. Her discussion of the many, varied health disorders associated with celiac disease is very comprehensive. One of the most compelling aspects to “Gluten Toxicity” is the many important questions asked regarding the future of clinical research. Ms. Stuart makes it crystal clear that we need to know much more about the physical and mental health effects of gluten-related illness. This can only come about by increasing awareness both within the medical and research communities, and throughout each of our communities. We must all become advocates for greater testing and more accurate diagnosis. Shelly’s personal story, woven throughout the book, adds interest and a personal appeal, but never attempts to substitute anecdote for the hard science she relies on throughout the book. In fact, at first glance, the book seemed rather technical to me, and I thought it would be best-suited for clinicians, but after reading through to the end, I changed my mind. This is an excellent resource, offering really insightful and accurate explanations for anyone suffering from or attempting to treat gluten related illness. Some of you may be familiar with Cleo Libonati, RN, and the book “Recognizing Celiac Disease”, which was one of the first books to comprehensively make connections between a vast array of medical conditions and celiac disease, and back them up with clinical research citations. Shelly Stuart’s book goes quite a bit farther, to discuss the pathophysiology, symptoms, and diagnosis of a huge number of health conditions associated with celiac disease and also non-celiac gluten intolerance.
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