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Found 6 results

  1. Celiac.com 02/19/2017 - I've been playing around in my kitchen and found a really interesting paleo side dish (or even a main!) can be created with kelp noodles. I know you're probably thinking: "Kelp? What?" But hear me out on this one. There's much more to kelp than just being huge plants that grow in the ocean! This impressive super food packs a nutritious punch with its high amounts of iodine, potassium, magnesium, calcium and iron, as well as vitamins, antioxidants, phytonutrients, amino acids, omega-3 fats and fiber. Wow! Not only do my gluten-free and paleo pals get to enjoy noodles, but on top of that you'll be nourishing your body in one of the most delicious ways I know of. And for my raw foodie friends, you'll be happy to know that these noodles are 100% raw. I enjoy these kelp noodles with a nut cheeze sauce that is full of flavor and love to pair them up with scallops or shrimp. A delicious and complete meal! Believe me, your non-gluten-free friends will be impressed with this creation as well as your kiddos. Try it out and let me know how it goes! Ingredients: 1 package Sea Tangle Kelp Noodles ½ cup nut cheeze (see below) â…› cup olive oil 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, minced ¼ teaspoon Celtic sea salt 1 tablespoon lemon juice, freshly squeezed 1 teaspoon Coconut Aminos 3 tablespoons nutritional yeast ½ teaspoon black pepper Nut Cheeze Recipe Ingredients: 2 cups cashews (I soaked mine overnight) NOTE: I have used pignoli nuts in the past but that really makes this cheeze sauce pricey. 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, de-stemmed and finely minced 3 tablespoons lemon juice, freshly squeezed 1 teaspoon Celtic sea salt 1 ½ cups water Equipment: VitaMix blender, Excalibur dehydrator Directions Prepare Sea Tangle Kelp Noodles according to package instructions. Combine with the rest of the ingredients, including the Nut Cheeze (below). Nut Cheeze Instructions Blend all ingredients together into a thick cream. Add more water, little by little, as needed. Time to serve! Enjoy! Notes The noodles can easily be made in a low-temperature oven as well as a dehydrator. So, do not be concerned with that. They will last for 3 days (longer if you reheat in an oven or microwave and have no raw concerns).
  2. Celiac.com 05/09/2016 - Exciting gluten-free news from Japan, where researchers say they have successfully sequenced the entire buckwheat genome. This is a big deal, because buckwheat flour offers certain advantages over numerous other gluten-free flours, especially in noodle making. Those familiar with buckwheat know that, despite its name, it contains no wheat or gluten, and is, in fact actually a kind of fruit. The sequencing of the buckwheat gene is exciting because it provides information necessary to develop new kinds of gluten-free noodles and other buckwheat-based foods that may be tastier and chewier than traditional gluten-free products. Yasuo Yasui of Kyoto University and colleagues have sequenced the full buckwheat genome for the first time, identifying genes which could be modified for improved cultivation capabilities and taste appeal. Buckwheat is a central ingredient in soba noodles -- a traditional Japanese favorite -- and is also used to make other noodles from China and Korea. In Italy, buckwheat is used in a dish called pizzoccheri, a type of short tagliatelle, a flat ribbon pasta, made with 80% buckwheat flour and 20% wheat flour. Elsewhere in Europe, buckwheat is used in French gallettes, and Slovenian struklji, While in other regions of the world it appears in pancakes and other foods. In the study, published in DNA Research, the Japanese team found genes related to "mochi-ness", which refers to the soft, chewy texture of foods like marshmallows or fresh bagels. Until now, scientists had not succeed in getting the distinctive 'mochi' texture with buckwheat," says Yasui. "Since we've found the genes that could give buckwheat this texture, I think we can hope to see foods, including soba noodles and doughy European foods, with radical new sensations appearing on the market in the near future,” Yasui adds. Some people are allergic to buckwheat, and Yasui says that the sequencing information may help to make buckwheat safe for those individuals as well. So, stay tuned to learn more about the future of buckwheat in crafting new, chewier noodles, and more. Source: kyoto-u.ac.jp
  3. Celiac.com 10/08/2015 - Want a light, healthy gluten-free vegetarian lunch that's tasty and offers a departure from a more standard noodle dish? Try this lovely Asian-style salad made with spiral or long julienne zucchini "noodles." Some people make this with raw zucchini, but that's hard to digest, so I blanche the zucchini noodles first. Ingredients: 3 to 4 medium zucchini, spiral cut or long thin strips 1 cup carrot, grated 2 green onions, thin diagonal slices ½ teaspoon salt 1½ cups thinly sliced and roughly chopped red cabbage ½ large red bell pepper, sliced thin and cut into 1-inch segments ½ cup cilantro, chopped Dressing: ⅓ cup rice vinegar seasoned with salt, pepper and sugar 2 tablespoons quality olive oil 1½ teaspoons dark sesame oil 2 cloves garlic, minced Pinch of red pepper flakes Directions: If you have a food processor or other spiral vegetable slicing tool, use it to make the zucchini noodles. Otherwise, cut zucchini into very long, thin strips, enough to make about 5 to 6 cups of zucchini noodles. Place zucchini noodles in a metal strainer and immerse in boiling water for about 30 seconds, until blanched. Once lightly blanched, remove the zucchini noodles and allow to drain well. Place the drained, blanched zucchini noodles in a large bowl. Add the cabbage, carrot, bell pepper, onions, and cilantro. In a medium bowl, whisk seasoned rice vinegar, olive oil, dark sesame oil, minced garlic, and red pepper flakes. Pour the dressing over the zucchini noodles and vegetables and gently toss to combine. Or, alternatively, serve dressing on the side. Serve immediately.
  4. This recipe is a classic that is perfect for a cold Winter's day. There is nothing like good old fashioned chicken noodle soup to warm up your day! Ingredients: 2 cups gluten-free flour, plus extra (I used Better Batter from the Gluten-free Mall) 3/4 tsp salt 3 eggs, plus 1 egg yolk 10 cups chicken stock (or a mixture of stock and broth) 1 tsp dried thyme 3 ribs celery sliced 3 carrots peeled and sliced 1 large onion chopped 1 dried bay leaf 1 bunch parsley 2 TB flat-leaf parsley (for garnish, optional) 1 3 to 3 1/2 lb. chicken (organic works best) Directions: 1. In a large pot, combine stock, celery, carrots, onions, bay leaf and chicken. Bring to a boil; reduce heat to medium and simmer for 1 hour to 1 hour and a half. Add parsley after 30 min. 2. Make the noodles: Mix eggs, egg yolk, salt and 1TB water. Place flour into a large bowl, make a well in the center, pour egg mixture into the well. Mix with a fork to form a stiff dough. Add a little more water if necessary. Then place dough on a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth (Dough will be stiff, but not too stiff to roll out). Divide dough into two portions. Roll each portion separately on a lightly-floured surface to 1/16" thickness and then cut into noodles 1/4" wide. 3. Put chicken on a plate to cool. Strain soup through a fine strainer into a large pot; put celery and carrots into a bowl. Discard remaining solids. Remove and discard chicken skin and bones. Cut chicken into pieces. 4. Bring liquid to a boil again. Shake excess flour off noodles and add to boiling liquid. Cook until tender, 10 to 15 min. Add chicken and reserved carrots and celery. Salt and pepper to taste. Garnish with flat-leaf parsley if desired.
  5. Like any casserole, this one is flexible. I've given you a good guideline for correct proportions, but add more or less salmon or tuna; more or less pasta; more or less peas – you get the picture. It will work and be delicious, regardless. Lately I've been using canned salmon instead of tuna in this traditional recipe – Costco even carries wild Alaskan Sockeye Salmon (boneless) in the can, which boasts 410mg Omega 3s per serving! So this casserole is not only delicious, but it's a deliciously healthy one-dish meal the whole family will enjoy! Obviously, if you have leftover grilled salmon from the night before, it goes without saying (though I'll say it anyway, just in case!) that re-purposing those leftovers in this casserole would be the very best option! I've also experimented with every dairy-free cheese and soup out there, and I can say with every confidence that the dairy in traditional casseroles like this one will not be missed if you choose to use my dairy-free suggestions. Enjoy this super easy casserole today, and love this casserole tomorrow for leftovers! Ingredients: 16 ounces gluten-free pasta spirals or penne (Le Veneziane Corn Penne; Tinkyáda Brown Rice Pasta Spirals; Ancient Harvest Corn-Quinoa Pagodas) – use more or less depending on whether you like your casseroles more “noodley” 32 ounces cream of mushroom soup (Imagine Creamy Portobello Mushroom Soup is dairy- and gluten-free) 29-32 ounces canned tuna or salmon, drained (be sure to remove bones if your brand contains bones) 16 ounces frozen or canned peas 7-8 ounces cheddar dairy or non-dairy cheese (Daiya Cheddar Style Shreds or Galaxy Nutritional Foods Veggie or Rice Shreds) Directions:Prepare noodles according to package directions. Drain and set aside. If using frozen peas, prepare according to package directions; if using canned peas, drain. Preheat oven to 350° F. In a large bowl, stir together soup, tuna or salmon, peas and cheese. Add drained pasta and stir to combine. Pour into a 2-quart casserole. Bake for 30 minutes, or until bubbly.
  6. This is a light dish that can be served as a meal or eaten as a side dish. The ingredients can vary depending on your taste buds. Preparation for this Thai salad is very minimal and with the right ingredients, this is a perfect quick gluten-free meal. This salad is light so it is perfect for those hot summer nights when you don't want to eat a heavy meal. Prep Time: 30 minutes Cook Time: 5 minutes Serves: (2) as a main dish or (4) as a side dish Ingredients: 8-10 oz. thin dried rice noodles (vermicelli size) 2 tomatoes, cut into small slices 5 green onions, sliced finely 2 cups snow peas, steamed or boiled until bright green but still firm 1-2 cups bean sprouts 1 cup fresh coriander or cilantro, roughly chopped 1 cup fresh basil, roughly chopped 1/4 cup dry-roasted peanuts OR cashews, left whole or lightly chopped 1/2 cup deep-fried tofu, cut into small cubes Garnish: fresh basil fresh coriander chopped peanutsDressing: 1 Tbsp. vegetable oil 1 tsp. sesame oil 2 Tbsp. gluten-free fish sauce OR 2 extra Tbsp. gluten-free soy sauce 5 Tbsp. gluten-free soy sauce 1 fresh red chili, de-seeded, OR 1/2 tsp. dried crushed chili or cayenne pepper 1-2 Tbsp. brown sugar or sugar substitute (to taste) juice of 1 fresh lime 2 cloves garlic, minced Preparation: Dunk noodles in a pot of boiling water. Remove pot from heat and allow noodles to soften in the hot water 10-15 minutes, or until soft enough to eat ('al dente'). When ready, drain and tip noodles into a large mixing bowl. Add the bean sprouts while noodles are still hot and gently toss (the residual heat from the noodles will lightly cook the sprouts). Mix the dressing ingredients together in a cup, stirring well to dissolve the sugar. Taste-test for a sweet-sour balance, adding more sugar if too sour for your taste. Note that the dressing will taste quite strong/salty now, but will be milder when combined with the salad. To the bowl of noodles and sprouts, add the tomatoes, green onion, shrimp or tofu, and fresh coriander. Toss to mix (If you're having trouble combining the noodles with the other ingredients because the noodles are too long and tangled, cut them several times with a pair of clean scissors.) Now add the dressing, fresh basil, and nuts, tossing well to incorporate. Taste test the salad. If not salty enough, add more fish sauce or soy sauce. If not spicy enough, add more chili. If too salty, add a little more lime juice. Eat immediately, or cover and allow to sit in the refrigerator for an hour or two, or until cold. Place on a serving platter or in a salad dish and sprinkle with fresh basil, coriander, and peanuts. Serve with wedges of lime. Note: I like to eat lots of veggies, so I add things like steamed cauliflower, broccoli, and carrots. Also, this salad tastes best when eaten fresh, as rice noodles tend to dry out when left longer than 2 days. Until then, place in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator, and enjoy!
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