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Found 25 results

  1. After countless hours of R&D, Food For Life is pleased to release the first available gluten-free breads, which are made from sprouted grains such as quinoa, millet and chia. It has become clear that many of the gluten free breads on the market today, while being "gluten-free", are simply not addressing the overall health needs of consumers. You see, gluten free breads lack the main all love in bread. They lack the one component that gives bread that familiar soft chewy texture. And, that component is gluten. Without Gluten, manufacturers are forced to use alternative ingredients that mimic the elasticity that gluten provides. And, many of them are choosing to feature egg, milk and refined starches today. However, in their quest to achieve even greater elasticity in an effort to win out on the soft and chewy test, consumers are seeing an ever expanding list of gluten free breads made from ingredients which you wouldn't expect in "natural" breads, some of which are sadly devoid of many nutrients. Yes, the race to replace gluten is getting to the point where it really needed to be addressed for the benefit of the gluten intolerant consumer. And, that is really the inspiration behind Food For Life's Sprouted For Life™ Gluten-Free Breads. Finally, a completely gluten free bread line in (4) varieties specifically created with your health in mind. Not only are they gluten free, but they are also vegan, and are made from incredibly nutritious ingredients like, sprouted quinoa, sprouted millet and hydrated chia seeds. Sprouted to maximize nutrition and digestibility. Available soon in the frozen section. With just one bite, you'll know they're a food for life! For more info visit our site.
  2. Celiac.com 07/31/2018 - Using funds from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Canada Research Chairs Program, researcher Charlene Elliott, PhD, of the Department of Communication, Media, and Film, University of Calgary recently set out to assess the nutritional quality of gluten-free products specifically marketed for children. For her assessment, Elliott bought child-targeted gluten-free food products from two major supermarket chains in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Elliott used the Pan American Health Organization Nutrient Profile Model to compare the nutritional quality of products labeled gluten-free with those not so labeled. A secondary analysis compared the nutritional profile of child-targeted gluten-free products to their non-gluten-free “equivalents.” Elliott’s analysis showed that child-targeted gluten-free products generally had lower amounts of sodium, total fat, and saturated fat, However, those same foods also had less protein and about the same amount of calories from sugar as child-targeted products without a gluten-free claim. According to the Pan American Health Organization criteria, both gluten-free products and "regular" products designed for children can be classified as having poor nutritional quality (88% vs 97%). Compared to their non-gluten-free equivalents, products with a gluten-free claim had similarly high sugar levels, (79% vs 81%). So, the big picture is that gluten-free supermarket foods targeted at children are generally less nutritious than their non-gluten-free counterparts, and both types have alarmingly high sugar content. A gluten-free label is no guarantee of healthier, more nutritious food for kids, and it’s a mistake for parents to buy gluten-free products believing they are healthier than their non-gluten-free equals. The evidence shows that is simply not true. The takeaway here seems to be that, gluten-free or not, supermarket foods aimed at children are generally poor in nutrition and loaded with sugar, and parents should choose wisely when buying food for their children. Source: Pediatrics, July 2018
  3. Celiac.com 06/07/2016 - The world of nutrition is currently obsessed with "super foods". Super foods are loosely defined as foods that are extremely high in nutrients – particularly antioxidants and vitamins – and which everyone is heartily advised to add to their diet. The problem with this approach is that, while focused firmly on nutrients, we are ignoring anti-nutrients! According to Wikipedia, an anti-nutrient is a compound in food that interferes with your absorption of other nutrients from a food. Most foods have varying amounts of anti-nutrients, toxins and other problematic compounds. A truly healthy diet will include weighing the good against the bad, while maintaining as much variety as possible. Once we have a clearer picture of how a food helps to support our nutrition, we can then decide how to include it in our diet and in what amount. Obviously, certain health conditions mean that certain foods are no longer healthful. For those with celiac disease, this means that grains with gluten in them are damaging to their health. It really doesn't matter how healthy wheat bran is for some – for celiacs, wheat bran is harmful. For those with allergies, you have a similar issue. Foods that may be healthy for some may not be for others. Another issue with food and health can be related to anti-nutrients. For instance, in the vegetarian world, we now hear more about phytate – often found in legumes – and how to reduce it in a plant-based diet. Salicylate is another anti-nutrient found in plant foods, and more people are finding that they need to consider this when choosing foods. Plants may also contain toxins, which are totally natural to the plant, but not good for you. Wikipedia indicates that a toxin is a substance that is directly poisonous, and capable of causing disease. For instance, some foods may contain naturally occurring cyanide compounds, or even arsenic in various forms. While we may not get enough to cause immediate problems, we certainly don't want to consume a lot of these toxins! Oxalate is another toxin present in many otherwise healthy foods. Oxalate poses many challenges for human health. It's a free radical. It promotes inflammation in your body. Because of its biochemistry, oxalate can be stored throughout your body, and can be particularly concentrated at the sites of previous injury, inflammation or surgery. Fundamentally, oxalate can be stored in tissues wherever the cells have taken it up. As a result, if you are someone who is absorbing too much oxalate from your diet, you can be contributing substantial stress to your body. Reducing the amount of oxalate in your diet cannot hurt you – you are reducing a totally non-nutritive substance for which the human body has no need and which contributes directly to health issues. However, reducing too many food types or nutrients in your diet can have negative impacts. The greater the variety in your diet, the better the chance that you are getting all your needed nutrients. The good news is that you can have a nutritious, high variety diet, and retain "super foods" in your diet which are high nutrition, gluten-free and low oxalate. Get Your Fiber The preponderance of processed foods in our diets can often leave us with hardly any fiber in our diet! Many gluten-free options are very low in fiber, and this can affect gut health. Fiber is not a direct nutrient for us per se – but it is a needed component that contributes to better gut flora and better health overall. Insoluble fiber adds bulk to the stool and promotes regularity. Most of us are not getting enough of this fiber, and as a result, can develop poor motility and constipation. Given that many whole grains are not good alternatives for those on a gluten-free diet, and the bran of many grains are actually high in oxalate, how can we get more healthy insoluble fiber? The good news is that one nutritional powerhouse is not only full of healthy insoluble fiber – it's also a plant source of Omega 3's. So a great solution to lack of insoluble fiber is flax seeds. Flax seeds can be eaten whole – but to really get the best benefits from this super food, it's best to grind your flax. Keep whole flax seeds in the freezer to preserve their freshness, and don't grind until just before using them. The recommended daily serving (which will also provide some soluble fiber) is two tablespoons. According to the Mayo Clinic, the right fiber goes much further than just regularity. If you increase soluble fiber, it can help reduce both blood sugar and cholesterol. Soluble fiber creates a gel-like material in the gut, and some research indicates that it may help to feed our gut bacteria. The benefits of soluble fiber are well known when it comes to cholesterol. The recommended food to get more soluble fiber is oats. However, whole oats are high in oxalate, and the oat bran has confusing test data. The solution? Psyllium! Pysllium is the medicinal ingredient in the popular product, Metamucil. Psyllium contains both soluble and insoluble fiber – and research on it shows that it can help to reduce cholesterol as well as normalize blood sugar. You can add it to baked products (but adjust the liquids), or sprinkle on foods. It's virtually tasteless – although you might find it does add some thickness or texture to liquids or foods. Fruits and vegetables are also good sources of both soluble and insoluble fiber and many are lower oxalate. Cabbages, lettuces, onions, cucumbers (with the skin) red bell peppers, orange, mango and grapes are all good low oxalate sources of fiber in your diet. Fruits There is no shortage of healthy options in fresh fruits that are also low oxalate, but the blueberry holds a special place among even the healthiest fruits. Research shows that blueberries are one of the most antioxidant rich foods available, and are included in most lists of super foods. Blueberries are one of the highest rated foods on the ORAC scale. The ORAC scale was developed by researchers at Tufts University, and is the measure of Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (hence the abbreviation ORAC). What this really means for you is that the higher something ranks on the ORAC scale, the more antioxidants you are getting. Blueberries are stars on this scale, with an ORAC value of 4,669 per 100 grams, according to Superfoodly.com. Wild blueberries rank higher than cultivated ones – but you can't go wrong with any blueberry. Another fruit that ranks very high in ORAC is the lowly cranberry. While very tart (and difficult to eat raw), cranberries are second only to blueberries in antioxidant levels. To reduce the acidity of the fruit, and make them more palatable, cook with water and some honey. Cranberries are very easy to cook and make a lovely side dish for fattier meats like lamb. They aren't just for turkey anymore! Consuming these tangy fruits also help to contribute to bladder health. For nutrition on the go, turn to golden seedless raisins. While dark raisins are tasty treats, the golden seedless variety is both lower in oxalate and higher in antioxidants. In fact, golden seedless raisins actually have a higher ORAC score than fresh blueberries! Combine that with convenience and portability, and you have an easy way to get more antioxidants in your day. Raisins also make a great treat for kids, because of their sweetness. Is the apple a super food? Yes it is! Easy to purchase and pack for lunch, this popular fruit is full of quercetin, which protects cells from damage and is often recommended for those with allergies. Not only is it full of healthy antioxidants, it also has twice the fiber of other commonly eaten fruits, including peaches, grapes and grapefruit, according to the site EverydayHealth.com. Veggies When looking at veggies, many of the foods that are considered most healthy are also very high in oxalate. Everyone talks today about how healthy the sweet potato is for us: but did you know that a ½ cup of sweet potato can have over 90 mg of oxalate in it? For people trying to eat a low oxalate diet, a single serving would be more oxalate than they should consume in a whole day! However, while avoiding high oxalate foods, you do need to eat color and variety to get your needed nutrition. If you want a lower carbohydrate, orange veggie – consider the kabocha squash. Not only does this lower carb, low oxalate veggie work as a substitute for many recipes that require sweet potato, it also has a very good nutrient profile. Self Nutrition Data lists Vitamin A and Vitamin C as well as a good serving of Folate, in addition to good amounts of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium. Of course, you want other colors in your veggies as well – and green leafy veggies are particularly known for their nutrition. While spinach would be a bad choice because of extremely high oxalate, you have lots of other greens to choose from. Focus on lower oxalate varieties of kale, including purple kale. The website, The World's Healthiest Foods, lists kale as a food that can lower cholesterol (if steamed) as well as lower your risk of cancer. Of course, kale is part of the cruciferous vegetable family, and these foods have many anti-cancer benefits. Kale is an excellent source of Vitamin K (your blood clotting factor), as well as vitamin A, vitamin C, manganese, copper, B6 and others. Don't forget your other brassicas while you are focusing on kale! The cruciferous veggies also support our bodies natural detox processes, which is very valuable in today's world where we are exposed to many environmental toxins. Broccoli is another low oxalate brassica that is good for you, whether you are eating the mature broccoli heads, or feasting on broccoli sprouts. Note that broccoli sprouts do have an edge over their more mature cousins – they might just taste better, and given that they can be added to a sandwich for some satisfying crunch, might be easier to work into your daily diet. Research gives the sprouts a further edge in cancer risk reduction and some research indicates they may actually help to prevent stomach cancer. Another excellent leafy green is the lowly turnip green. Turnip greens are very high in calcium, and are even lower in oxalate than kale. A cup of cooked turnip greens will also get you more than 100% of the RDA for vitamin K. In addition, you'll get vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, copper, manganese, calcium, and vitamin E. Each serving will give you 15% of your daily requirement for B6. When thinking of deep red veggies, go for red cabbage. This versatile veggie is very low in oxalate, and that lovely red color means that it has even more protective phytonutrients, according to World's Healthiest Foods, than its green sibling! One serving of red cabbage delivers more than four times the polyphenols of green cabbage. Fats and Oils You can't read on super food nutrition anywhere and not run into the avocado. A great source of healthy monounsaturated fat, the avocado has also been linked to reduced risk of cancer, as well as lowered risk of heart disease and diabetes. While we think of avocados as a fatty food, they are actually a good source of fiber, with 11 to 17 grams of fiber per fruit! You'll also get a dose of lutein, an antioxidant recommended for eye health. Web MD says that lutein is a potent antioxidant, which is found in high concentrations in the eye. The combination of lutein and zeaxanthin (another antixodant) help to protect your eyes from damaging, high energy light. Some research indicates that a diet high in lutein and zeaxanthin may reduce the risk of cataracts by as much as 50%. Coconut oil is another excellent fat that can benefit our bodies in a host of ways. Doctor Oz lists a number of benefits, including supporting thyroid health and blood sugar control. This may be related to the form of saturated fat that is found in coconut oil, called lauric acid. Lauric acid is a medium-chain triglyceride. This kind of fat actually boosts immune system, and has antibiotic, antiviral and antifungal properties. It may also be a tool in your weight loss arsenal. A study in 2009 actually showed the eating 2 Tablespoons of coconut oil daily, allowed subjects to lose belly fat more effectively. Even better news for those who are following a low oxalate diet: both avocado and coconut oil have zero oxalate! Nuts, Seeds and Legumes Unfortunately, many foods in this category are high oxalate – and so won't qualify for our super food list. While you might be able to have a couple of walnut halves, or a similar amount of pecans, nuts are generally just to high to have in servings of more than 3-5 pieces. However, if you are looking for a superfood in this category, look no further than pumpkin seeds! Pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of vegetable-based protein, and are another portable food. A great snack for the health conscious can be made with raisins and pumpkin seeds – both are low oxalate, and the protein of the pumpkin seeds will help you to stay fuller longer. According to LiveStrong.com, a handful of pumpkin seeds will give you over 8 grams of protein. At the same time, pumpkin seeds are low in sugar, and provide you with fiber as part of the carbohydrate in them. You will also get vitamin A, vitamin B, vitamin K, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, magnesium, calcium, iron, manganese, zinc, potassium, copper and phosphorus in that small and compact package! If pumpkin seeds don't qualify as a super food, it's hard to say what would! When it comes to legumes, many are stars for protein, but one of the best options is the red lentil. Lentils in general are easier to prepare than other types of legumes – they do not require the soaking and preparation time that many legumes do. At the same time, they are powerhouses of nutrition, with molybdenum, folate, fiber, copper, phosphorus and manganese all at more than 50% of your daily requirement. One cup of cooked lentils will also give you 36 % of your daily need for protein, according to World's Healthiest Foods. And all this nutrition is provided in a food that is virtually fat free and low in calories. You cannot go wrong! As an added benefit, some studies have found that eating high fiber foods like red lentils may reduce the risk of heart disease. The more fiber, the lower the risk of heart disease. Fish We are always hearing that we need to have more fish in our diets. It seems sometimes that not a week goes by when we are not hearing that we should be eating less meat, and getting less fat – with the suggestion that more fish would benefit us. When you think of the super food of fish, you have to think of salmon. Salmon is a fatty fish, and it's one of the best sources available for omega-3 fatty acids. In today's world of processed foods, omega-3's are one of the nutrients that we don't get enough of. Your best bet with salmon is to get wild-caught fish. Farmed salmon do not have the same nutrient profile, which may be related to the kind of food they are fed. Along with the decreased nutrient profile, studies have indicated that farmed salmon contains significantly higher concentrations of a number of contaminants (including PCBs, dieldrins, toxaphenes, dioxins and chlorinated pesticides) than wild caught salmon. World's Healthiest Foods states that a 4 ounce piece of Coho salmon will get you 55% of your daily requirements for omega-3 fats. On top of that, you'll get more than 50% of your daily requirement for vitamin B12, vitamin D, selenium, vitamin B3, protein and phosphorus, as well as other B vitamins and minerals. Omega-3 fatty acids will provide you a host of benefits, from reduction of inflammation, to better brain function. Omega-3 fat is also heart healthy, and can contribute to a reduced risk of heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease. Research indicates that eating salmon at least 2 to 3 times a week will give you the best benefits. Spice it up Spices can be a bit tricky, if you want to keep your oxalate low. Many spices – while tasty – are very high in oxalate! A great example of this is turmeric. A staple in most curry recipes, turmeric is extremely high oxalate – so while it has a reputation as a super food, it would not be a good choice if you are trying to keep your oxalate low. So what is your option if you love to eat foods spiced with turmeric? Well, the easiest approach is to stock your spice rack with a health food store supplement; cook with curcumin extract! While it may seem a bit odd at first, if you buy a curcumin extract (which is the extract from turmeric), you can get the flavor and leave the oxalate behind. While not technically a "food" when you cook with a supplement, you certainly get all the benefits of the original super food – turmeric – without the downside of oxalate. Another highly beneficial spice is cinnamon. Research clearly shows how helpful cinnamon is for managing blood sugar. However, ground cinnamon is an extremely high oxalate spice. So how can you get the flavor you want, while avoiding the oxalate? One solution is to cook with a cinnamon extract that you buy at the health food store! One brand known to be low oxalate is Doctor's Best. It is a dry extract in capsules – simply break open the capsules and use the contents in your dish. This allows you to get all the therapeutic benefits of the extract as well as the taste. You can also cook with essential oils and culinary oils – but use them carefully. Essential oils can be very strong and can irritate the tissues of the mouth and digestive tract. One drop of good quality essential cinnamon oil will replace as much as 1 tablespoon of ground cinnamon. Culinary oils are made for flavoring – follow the directions on the product that you buy. Either way, you will get the taste – and you avoid the oxalate. Enjoying Your Food! As with anyone who wants to eat a healthy diet full of super foods, the trick is to focus on the best nutrition, and get lots of variety. While some foods may not be as "super" as others, if you are making colorful meals, with healthful selections from across the spectrum, you'll be doing your body a favor with flavor! Where Does Oxalate Go? Once you have eaten oxalate, you have to excrete it through urine, feces or sweat. But what happens if you don't? A study on rats was able to trace where in the body a dose of oxalate remained. The scientists used a special carbon molecule – carbon 14 – in the oxalate they gave to the rats, so that they could find the oxalate wherever it went in the body. What they found is that if the oxalate was not excreted from the body, it was stored everywhere: 68% in the bones 9% in the spleen 8% in the adrenal glands 3% in the kidneys 3% in the liver 8% in the rest of the body These results are in direct opposition to conventional medical thinking, that oxalate only affects the kidneys. It clearly shows us that the whole body – but particularly the bones, key glands and detoxification organs – are all affected. This is another good reason to reduce the amount of oxalate in your diet! Is Spinach Really That Bad For You? A relatively simple study in the late 1930's looked at rats fed a diet that was only adequate in calcium. To bring the levels of calcium up, the rats were given spinach, equaling about 8% of their diet. While most of us think of spinach in terms of iron, it is also relatively high in calcium. The results of the study were shocking: 47. A high percentage of rats died between the age of 21 days and 90 days 48. The bones of the rats were extremely low in calcium (despite adding it to the diet through the spinach) 49. Tooth structure was poor and dentine of the teeth poorly calcified 50. For these animals, reproduction was impossible. Researchers concluded that not only did spinach not supply the needed calcium (because of the oxalate), but the spinach also rendered the calcium from other foods unavailable. What we know now is that oxalate is a mineral chelator – and rather than delivering minerals, it was robbing them from the rats. Getting Your Vitamin K Vitamin K is a very important nutrient. Life Extension indicates that new research from 2014 links vitamin K to longevity. In fact, the highest intakes of vitamin K reduced the likelihood of dying from any cause by 36%! So, you definitely want to get vitamin K in your diet. However, most of us think that we need to eat high oxalate greens – like spinach – in order to get good amounts of vitamin K. Nothing could be further from the truth! Kale, collards and turnip greens are all higher in vitamin K than spinach, and they have a fraction of the oxalate.
  4. Hello Everyone, New here and have joined because I couldn't find an answer to my question online. I was diagnosed after a long spell with anemia in 2015 and have been on the diet (and improving!) ever since. But I wonder whether how much rice I'm eating is very healthy. I have always liked to bake and it took awhile to find a flour mix I like (Cup 4 Cup - worth its weight in gold...), but a lot of gluten-free food subs in rice (white rice, brown rice, rice flour) plus I eat actual rice as a side dish. Is this too much? Keep in mind, I also eat salads like it's my job and love making vegetable soups too. Any advice on gluten-free foods (specifically flours) that don't fall back on rice as a substitute? I should add that I can't really get excited about quinoa, despite my best efforts. Thanks in advance.
  5. I've heard a few times now that it is important to consume enough fat when on a gluten free diet. Obviously fat is important no matter what but why is it especially important when eating gluten-free? Does it help the small intestine or something else related?
  6. Hey guys, So I'm looking for a nutrition bar/protein bar that not only has to be gluten free, but also nut free. My girlfriend and I live together and she is highly allergic to all tree nuts, so we can't have any nut products in the house (coconut is the exception). I'm looking for a product or recipe that satisfies both of these conditions. I've tried places like google and pinterest, as well as all grocery stores in my area, and everything I'm finding is free of one or the other, but never both. For what it's worth, we live in Ontario, Canada, right on the border of the US. While we don't necessarily want to shop over there with the exchange rate, we will consider it if their are no other options. Thanks in advance!
  7. Celiac.com 08/28/2015 - Perhaps unsurprisingly, a study of over 3,200 supermarket products finds gluten-free foods aren't a healthier choice than their non gluten-free counterparts. If you have celiac disease, or gluten sensitivity, gluten-free foods are necessary and beneficial, but the new study suggests that, nutritionally speaking, there's no evidence that they're any healthier than their gluten-containing counterparts. The research looked at 3,200 food products on Australian grocery shelves, and found little or no nutritional difference between regular foods and comparable gluten-free items. Now, that doesn't make gluten-free products unhealthy, just no better than their gluten-containing equivalents. But if you are not celiac or gluten-sensitive, then you're probably spending more money to get the same nutrition, and not getting any health benefits. Strangely, plenty of people seem to believe that sugary treats such as cakes are 'healthier' if they are gluten-free. The study compared supermarket products in 10 categories: bread, breakfast cereal, dry pasta, cereal bars, cakes, sweet biscuits, ice cream, potato chips, processed meats, and candies. The study team assessed foods using the Australian Government's Health Star Rating, which rates food by nutritional value. The rating system awards one star to the foods with the least nutritional value, and five stars to those with the most. Basically, when they crunched the numbers using the Health Star Rating, the team found no significant difference between the ratings of gluten-free foods and their regular alternatives. For me, though, the real takeaway is that there's a good amount of processed food out their, gluten-free or not, and you're likely healthier eating fresh, whole foods than anything processed. Or, alternatively, it takes a bit of effort to maintain a healthy diet, whether you are gluten-free or not. Share your thoughts below. Source: Researchgate.net.
  8. For several days now I've been using SunFiber, which is a proprietary gluten-free invisible fiber made by Tomorrow's Nutrition, and the effects are noteworthy. My doctor recently recommended that I increase my daily fiber intake to help reduce my total cholesterol levels, and at around the same time some samples of SunFiber arrived for me to try out. Going on the assumption that the timing of these two things may not be a coincidence, I decided to begin using SunFiber for this purpose. According to information about the product provided by Tomorrow's Nutrition, SunFiber contains 6 grams of clinically proven, clear and grit-free soluable fiber, and it is also a proven prebiotic. It also helps to control the glycemic index of foods, which is an added bonus. What I really like about SunFiber is that it is totally tasteless, and is a superfine powder that quickly seems to dissolve in any liquid, and it doesn't change the flavor or color of the drink. I really dislike all of the artificial colors and flavors contained in many common fiber supplements, and SunFiber doesn't contain anything except their fiber and guar gum. I've already seen a vast improvement in regularity, and expect to see an improvement on my next cholesterol check. I'd recommend SunFiber for many reasons, but especially because it is a very clean and easy to take fiber supplement. For more info visit: www.tomorrowsnutrition.com. Review written by Scott Adams.
  9. Celiac.com 11/21/2014 - Some afternoons at work seem to go by slowly. The other day I decided to try a PureFit Nutrition Bar instead of my usual cup of coffee. Since I love peanut butter and nuts, I figured it would be good...and it was! This bar is chewy, sweet, and filling. About 10 minutes after eating it, I felt more alert and had no desire to continue snacking. I highly recommend these bars for their nutritional value and outstanding taste. PureFit has a loyal customer base and for good reason – these bars are delicious! For more info visit: www.purefit.com. Review written by Patricia Seeley.
  10. If you think that there is nothing new when it comes to gluten-free oatmeal, we're happy to tell you that Convenient Nutrition's Original Gluten-Free Oatmeal is different from anything else on the market. In addition to being gluten-free, this oatmeal is made with 100% grass fed, hormone-free pure whey protein concentrate. If you're looking for a tasty alternative to traditional gluten-free oatmeal that can also provide the benefit of added whey protein, then you should try this product. It's also great to take with you to school or work for a quick, healthy meal or snack. Visit their site for more information: www.convenient-nutrition.com. Review written by Patricia Seeley.
  11. Great energy bars do not have to contain soy. If you're gluten-free and can't eat soy, you should try this new gluten-free energy bar made by Ebars. The main ingredients are almonds, honey, oats, flaxseed and pumpkin seed. The sweetness of the bars is provided by coconut sugar and raspberry, and the himalayan pink salt ensures the bars are not too sweet. I found that they satisfied my cravings for something chewy and delicious at the same time. In addition to being gluten and soy-free, they are also 100% USDA Certified Organic, Kosher, and Non-Dairy. For more information visit their site: www.ebars.com. Review written by Patricia Seeley.
  12. Celiac.com 10/05/2012 - Buckwheat flour significantly improves the nutrition and texture in gluten-free breads, according to a new study published in the journal Food Hydrocolloids. The study examines the role of buckwheat and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) in making gluten-free breads. The researchers point out that the food industry has cleared numerous formulation hurdles associated with removing gluten from dough, and created numerous new gluten-free products. However, they add, many gluten-free breads are still made with pure starches, "resulting in low technological and nutritional quality." The research team included M. Mariotti, M. Ambrogina Pagani and M. Lucisano. They are affiliated with the Department of Food Science and Technology and Microbiology (DiSTAM) at the University of Milan. In their study, they found that high levels of buckwheat flour improves both the texture and nutrition of gluten-free breads. Their findings showed that including up to 40% de-hulled buckwheat flour improved the leavening characteristics and overall quality of gluten-free breads. Because it is high in dietary fiber, the buckwheat flour increases dough viscosity, along with "the swelling and gelling properties of the buckwheat starch and the emulsion-forming and stabilizing properties of the globulin protein fraction,” the researchers wrote. The study also found that bread crumbs in gluten-free bread made with buckwheat flour and the food additive HPMC were softer than in gluten-free bread made without buckwheat flour. For their study, the research team evaluated ten bread formulas, 2 commercial, 8 experimental, with varying levels of buckwheat flours and HPMC. These formulas used both de-hulled and puffed buckwheat flour. The team based all experimental formulas on recipes from the two commercial samples. The formula that yielded the most favorable gluten-free bread included, 40% de-hulled buckwheat flour, 5% puffed buckwheat flour and 0.5% HPMC. Source: Journal of Food Hydrocolloids doi: 10.1016/j.foodhyd.2012.07.005
  13. Celiac.com 04/15/2013 - Enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma (EATL) is a gut cancer that often ends in death. Currently, doctors have very little idea what factors might help patients survive. The manner in which clinical presentation, pathological features and therapies influence EATL outcome was the subject of a recent study by a team of researchers. The research team included: G. Malamut; O. Chandesris; V. Verkarre; B.Meresse, C. Callens, E. Macintyre, Y. Bouhnik, J.M. Gornet; M. Allez; R. Jian; A. Berger; G. Châtellier; N. Brousse, O. Hermine, N. Cerf-Bensussan, and C. Cellier. They are variously affiliated with the Université Paris Descartes, the Gastroenterology Department of Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, APHP, and Inserm U989 in Paris, France. For their study, the team evaluated the medical files of 37 well-documented patients with celiac disease and T-cell lymphoma. They then analyzed lymphoma and intestinal mucosa by histopathology, multiplex PCR and intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes phenotyping. Using Kaplan-Meier curves with Logrank test and Cox Model they then analyzed patient survival and prognostic factors. They found 15 patients with lymphoma-complicated non-clonal enteropathy, celiac disease, two patients with type I refractory celiac disease, and 20 patients with clonal type II refractory celiac disease. Twenty-five patients underwent surgery with resection of the main tumor mass in 22 cases. Univariate analysis showed that non-clonal celiac disease, serum albumin levels under 21.6g/L at diagnosis, chemotherapy and surgical resection predicted good survival (p=0.0007, p Multivariate analysis showed that serum albumin level>21.6g/L, chemotherapy and reductive surgery were all significantly associated with increased survival rates (p The results reinforce the value of assessing celiac disease type in patients with T-cell lymphoma, and suggest that a combination of nutritional, chemotherapy and reductive surgery may improve survival rates in cases of EATL. Source: Dig Liver Dis. 2013 Jan 9. pii: S1590-8658(12)00438-0. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2012.12.001.
  14. Ok for those of you who do not know me I travel a lot. So from time to time I accidentally ingest gluten in one form or another. For instance I found out today that Sodium Starch Glycolate is technically gluten and can cause a full reaction in someone who is as sensitive to it as I am. Thanks to #glutenfreeinsc post I now know what I was getting in my diet that was causing a reaction. So I've decided to start trying different things that can help me either get better faster once I ingest gluten or reduce the reaction if taken daily. Keep in mind that I am a little bit eccentric at times. Tral 1: zGlutn by systemic formulas I decided to eat a slice of bread and take 4 pills at the same time. I know this is insane but I wanted to know if it worked. So I ate the bread during lunch and told my boss that If i didn't make it into work the next day I was probably dead... The next two hours: a little cloudy feeling but not very severe. And no GI issues. That evening: Kept working and didn't feel very cloudy but had to pace myself. I was a little tired but still no severe reaction Went home and went to bed after a light dinner. My stomach was growling a bit but no pain and no noticeable diarrhea or nausea. This was a surprise to me since I always feel very sick, get stuck in the bathroom and can't think straight after I get gluten. I also get a rash around my mouth. I know that's gross but you understand my plight. Next Morning: a little bit of a hot feeling in my stomach but nothing too bad. I felt a little bit cloudy but still functional. Worked through the day no problem except for a two trips to the lavatory. Conclusion: helped a ton. Wouldn't recommend trying this at home because it wasn't a cure but if you get gluten by accident it can reduce your symptoms dramatically. I've been taking it every day and it seems to be helping. Has anyone else tried this product? I got it from a nutritionist. Iang if anyone has a product that works for them as vitamin I want to try it. apparently ciliact is terrible. I'll keep trying supplements and diets and keep you guys updated.
  15. Hi, I'm 26 years old and I was diagnosed with celiac yesterday by intestinal biopsy. I have stopped eating gluten since then. However I'm concerned about being malnourished. I'm very thin and also anemic. I'm barely eating right now, I have no appetite at all and it seems like *anything* I put into my stomach sits in there like rocks. I'm 5,5 and 114 pounds. What do we do in the meantime before our intestines heal to get nutrients?
  16. Many posters have started topics as to whether there is a connection between celiac and heart arrythmias, skipped beats, and irregularities. I post on a forum called afibbers.org because this is one of my food-related curses. Today there was a new post by one of the founding members of the forum, who is a nutritionist, who posted a compendium of notes she had taken at various conferences she had attended on the subject at hand. This is one person's (albeit a pretty informed person) take on the topic and I found it very interesting reading. Those of you who have experienced a racing heart, skipped beats, etc., might be interested in reading it. I was particularly flabbergasted to note the statement I have bolded below: This is the first I have heard of such a condition. I will look into it. "3. Dysbiosis. An imbalance between friendly and unfriendly gut flora. Typically, it’s too much unfriendly. Candida albicans overgrowth is an example of dysbiosis. There are 500 species gut bacteria. About 25 have official names. Besides releasing various chemicals and cytokines that cause inflammation which then gets into the blood stream (translocation) which is typical in surgical patients who develop complications – (sepsis, toxic shock). Translocation starts in the gut. Leaky gut can be the source of autoimmune disorders. Evaluate gut flora with Comprehensive Digestive Stool Analysis (CDSA) Genova and include parasites. Or test for Inflammatory Cytokines – Interleukin 11 in an IBD blood panel. SIBO (small intestine bacterial overgrowth) was discussed in a post not long ago. Bacteria the colon or large intestine migrates into the small intestine where it doesn’t belong and causes significant GI problems. [see References listing] Important – It should be noted that people who have had severe GI-related infections such as C. diff are left with what is known as Post-Infectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome (PI-IBS) and this stays with them for life. They will always be highly susceptible to any type of toxin or exposure such as minor food poisoning or a gut bug. They must be mindful to keep their bowel flora optimized continually (using high-quality probiotics). " http://www.afibbers.net/forum/read.php?9,136149
  17. I have been searching far and wide for actual scientific information on pregnancy nutrition, especially for people with celiac. The problem is that there is so much woo(pseudoscience) mixed in with most pregnancy sites. The baby is too important to chance on some non professional just saying yea this worked for me. I am in my early 30s and the disease took away any pregnancy chances in my 20s. I am not going to get many more chances/years so lets make this count. Hard science only and I will be very appreciative for your help! I am coming to the community for help in finding papers and resources I can trust in developing my meal plans. Finds so far: Mayo clinic pregnancy nutrition site USDA Supertracker food plan organizer / tracker
  18. Foods derived from cereal grains (wheat, rye, barley, oats) are popular staples in our diet. In the past decade especially, a renewed enthusiasm for "whole grains", and increased dietary fiber, has lead to increased consumption of these cereals in relatively unrefined form, and often in combination, as with granola cereals, and whole wheat breads fortified with bran, coarse flours, and other additives. The argument in favor of whole grains is based on two considerations: 1) The nutrient content of whole grains and their unrefined flours is greater than refined flours. White flour has been considered by some an inferior food since it is missing some micro-nutrients. However white flours and light white bread are sometimes better tolerated than the whole grain foods. 2) The indigestible fiber in whole grains contributes to stool bulk, reduces the opportunity for constipation, and absorbs toxic or harmful molecules, which, escorted from the bowel by fiber, have less opportunity to do harm. The regulating and binding actions of grain fibber, it is argued, would reduce the incidence of bowel cancer, if eaten over a lifetime. The favorable fibers are probably better found in vegetables and fruit. While there favorable arguments for a high cereal grain intake there are major problems with these foods. Craving and compulsive eating of flour-based foods is common, especially the reward an dessert foods, containing sugar. These high-carbohydrate foods contribute the major caloric input to obese persons. The diseases clearly associated with Cereal grains or "Gluten intolerance" are the bowel disorders bearing the names,"celiac Disease", "Non-Tropical- Sprue", or "Gluten-Enteropathy", and the skin disorder, dermatitis herpetiformis. The clinical presentations of cereal-grain intolerance, which can be recognized from the history or pattern of illness alone include: Diarrhea, chronic with malabsorption, weight loss, micro-nutrient deficiencies, blood loss and anemia. Abdominal pain may be recurrent and associated with flutulence, distention, and intermittent bowel motility disturbance. Minor gluten-enteropathy may not involve diarrhea, and malabsorption may be inconspicuous or inconsistent. A nutritional anemia may be the presenting problem, although the patient will have an associated history of intermittent abdominal pain and distension. The anemia results from malabsorption iron, folic acid and/or vitamin B12. Arthritic or Fibrositic Syndromes: Aching, stiffness, and fatigue are three common symptoms which occur together in a variety of disorders, and occasionally remit completely on an elimination diet which excludes cereal-grains and other allergenic foods. Brain Disturbances: symptoms include deep, burning sensations in arms and legs, restless legs, numbness and tingling which comes on rapidly with sitting, squatting, and lying in bed; brain effects are manifest by a sense of confusion or "fuzzy-head, disorganization, irritability, and memory impairment. The occurrence of resting pain in joints, particularly the hands with slight swelling, and stiffness is the early prevention of rheumatoid arthritis; it can occur strictly as a manifestation of wheat (and other food) allergy. The activity of rheumatoid arthritis may be reduced in some patients by cereal grain and other allergenic food restriction. There are at least four mechanisms involved at the bowel level for gluten intolerance: 1) Lack of the digestive enzyme, intestinal glutaminase. 2) Antibody production to the prolamine, or a fragment of it. 3) Increased permeability of the bowel to macromolecules including the antigenic protein and its fragments. 4) Increased production and release of mediators such as histamine, seratonin, kinins, prostaglandins, and interleukins. A wheat gluten-triggered mechanism has been studied in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The clinical observation is that wheat ingestion is followed within hours by increased joint swelling and pain. Little and his colleagues studied the mechanism, as it developed sequentially, following gluten ingestion. Platelet Seratonin Release in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A study in Food Intolerant Patients. Little C. Stewart A.G., Fennesy M.R. Lancet 1983.297-9. The Gluten Proteins Gluten is a mixture of individual proteins, classified in two groups, the prolamines and the glutelins. The most troublesome component of Gluten is the Prolamine, Gliadin. It is Gliadin in wheat that causes the major problem in celiac disease, and Gliadin antibodies are most commonly found in the immune complexes, associated with major systemic disease (Unsworth, D.J., et. al., IgA Anti-Gliadin Antibodies in Celiac disease, Clin Exp Immunol. 1981: 46:286-93.Keiffer M, et. al., Wheat Gliadin Fractions and Other Cereal Antigens Reactive with Antibodies in the Sera of of Celiac Patients, Clin Exp Immunol. 1982;50:651-60). We eat the seeds of the grain plants. The seed has a bran casing, a starchy endosperm which contains 90 % of the protein, and a small germ nucleus which is the plant embryo, waiting to grow. Any flour made from the starchy endosperm contains prolamines and is potentially toxic to the grain intolerant person. If we look at the different grains we find that each has its own prolamine. The following list gives the type of prolamine each grain contains, and the percentage of protein the prolamine has in relationship to the entire grain: Wheat - Gliadin - 69% Rye - Secalinin - 30-50% Oats - Avenin - 16% Barley - Hordein - 46-52% Millet - Panicin - 40% Corn - Zien - 55% Rice - Orzenin- 5% Sorghum - Kafirin - 52% Celiac disease may serve as a model of wheat allergy. No-one should make the mistake of assuming this is the only form of wheat allergy. When wheat is the principle problem food, there is a consensus that barley, oats, and rye must be excluded as well. Millet, is intermediate in the list of offenders; corn and rice are usually tolerated when gluten prolamines are the chief and only food intolerance, although corn is a major food-allergen in its own right. Triticale is a new hybrid grain with the properties of wheat and rye, and is excluded on a gluten-free diet [bell L., Hoffer M., Recommendations for Foods of Questionable Acceptance for Patients with Celiac Disease,J.Can. Dietetic Ass'n: 1981; 42:2; 143-15]. The identity and the amount of the prolamine decides the kind of reaction that is likely to occur. It should be noted that there is considerable variability in the prolamine content of various foods made from cereal grains, and this variability is one of the many reasons why food reactions are not consistent. The usual definition of celiac disease links chronic diarrhea, with evidence of malabsorption, and changes in the surface of the small bowel. Most medical textbooks dogmatically state that an intestinal biopsy must be taken and must show typical changes before the diagnosis is made. The biopsy allows a pathologist to examine microscopically the surface of the small intestine. The surface of the small intestine is covered by a dense mat of projecting nipples called villi which shed cells containing digestive enzymes, and absorb food molecules. In long-standing celiac disease one expects the villi to be blunted and the surface to be smoothed out. While the biopsy is a useful procedure it has several drawbacks; It is a procedure with a small incidence of dangerous complication, especially bowel perforation. It is a small sample and may miss patchy or irregular bowel changes. Significant protein intolerance, and increased bowel porosity may exist despite normal appearance of the bowel lining under the microscope. Patients in remission or with intermittent symptoms may have normal biopsy results but remain exquisitely sensitive to some prolamine, or peptide fragment challenges. [bjarnson, I., et. al., Intestinal Permeability Defect in Celiac Disease, Lancet. 1983 1284-85]. The most significant test of gluten intolerance is remission of symptoms when grains are eliminated for a trial period of 3-6 weeks. I have often reviewed the history of patients with chronic diarrhea, and associated abnormalities, who have been "thoroughly investigated" in an academic center and left untreated because their biopsy result was normal. Physicians, who make therapeutic decisions solely on the basis of biopsy results are being dogmatic, not scientific, and certainly not serving the best interests of their patients who simply want to be better. Investigations which do not lead to effective therapy are of no value to patients. Diagnosis of gluten-sensitivity in all disorders may be facilitated in the near future by better immunological laboratory tests, including measurement of circulating serum antibodies directed against these proteins, and of circulating immune complexes which contain food antigens. [O'Farrelly, et. al., Alpha-Gliadin Antibody Levels: A Serological Test for Celiac Disease, 1983 Lancet; 286:2007-2010]. Better tests would permit the demonstration of increased GITPERM, and the entrance of abnormal macromolecules after test meals. Eventually the path through the body of such molecules may be studied by labeling them with isotopes, and tracking them with scanning methods like positron emission tomography. Irritable Bowel Syndrome An unexplained bowel disturbance, characterized by abdominal pain, gas, diarrhea, often alternating with constipation, is diagnosed as the "Irritable Bowel Syndrome" and too often attributed to "psychogenic causes". We recognize right away that the label "psychogenic causes" describes the lack of biological understanding more than it describes the patient's problem. The treatment usually offered includes bulk laxatives, tranquilizers mixed with antispasmodic drugs, and not infrequently, a trip to the psychiatrist, who is not likely to do a dietary history. The success rate with these methods in one study was only 12%! [Waller, S.L., Misiewicsz: Lancet 1969 ii: 753-6, Prognosis in Irritable Bowel Syndrome].Food studies are seldom undertaken in the assessment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Not a single patient whom I have seen with this disorder has had a food diary examined, nor any trial of exclusion diets. Dietary advice commonly-given includes "high-fibber" diets, usually increased cereal grains, which are contraindicated. Studies which allege to rule out food intolerance are poorly conducted, often basing negative results on limited, selected food challenges. Proper studies would utilize the complete methodology of diet revision therapy, and would observe patients in real-life conditions, ingesting real food over a significant period of time. The irritable bowel syndrome is at least in part a food-intolerance disorder, and the program outlined in this book will generally be helpful. In a recent study by V. Alum Jones et al, food intolerance was shown to be a major factor in causing the irritable bowel syndrome in 25 patients. This study is of particular interest because it was arranged to reveal something of the mechanism of this disorder. The results indicate that this particular presentation of food intolerance was not the result of immune events, was not associated with high blood-histamine levels, nor circulating immune complexes. Rather the disturbance seemed to be related to increased levels of Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), synthesized and secreted by the bowel itself. Prostaglandin production is inhibited by ASA, and all of the other anti-arthritic medications, and may prevent the irritable bowel effect if taken before meals. The foods causing the irritable-bowel symptoms were (in order of frequency) Wheat...9 Corn .... 5 Milk.... 4 Coffee. 4 Tea..... 3 Citrus.. 2 All the patients found to be intolerant of wheat had normal results of intestinal biopsy. Not all wheat-induced bowel disorders are celiac disease! The important point, once again, is that the mechanisms of food intolerance are multiple and complex! The only practical way to study food intolerance is by trials of dietary revision, and challenges with real food. One interesting observation made by several of my patients is that they always got somewhat better while in hospital, having multiple tests done. Psychological factors? No. Hospital tests for gastrointestinal disorders always involve days of fasting. If you stop eating foods that are hurting you, your symptoms improve! Proper NP may avoid the waste, in terms of dollars and disappointment, that inappropriate medical investigation and treatment incurs, when a trial of appropriate DRT will often cure the "disease" under investigation. This not to deny that emotions influence bowel function, since this is clearly the case. The "Gut Brain Axis" has become a subject of specialized study because of the complexity of interaction of these two life-determining organ systems. Food selection, emotional experiences, and eating behaviors interact complexly. Anger, frustration, fear will profoundly influence food selection, appetite, digestion, and metabolism; while food selection, digestion and metabolism will determine your emotional reactivity. There is a continuous loop of causal relationships, not a one-way vector. When patients are told they have bowel dysfunction because of stress, tension, or anxiety, this is only a half truth. The other half of the truth is that patients have stress, tension, and anxiety because of bowel dysfunction. The more subjective mood-related symptoms are difficult to assess, and are attributed to "psychiatric causes" although no authority seems to know what that means! The brain effects are an expression of disorderly molecular flow through the brain. Specific nuero-active effects of grains include the circulating peptides, which have been described earlier in the book, as WMOD, and are further discussed in the last section of this chapter. Indications for Trial of Gluten Restriction NP advocates liberal gluten restrictions in a variety of circumstances, simply because the results are surprisingly good. The core diet developed by clinical trials, and described in subsequent chapters is initially free of cereal grains, since they are frequent offenders in food intolerance problems. Not only patients with bowel disorders benefit, but also people whose bowels function apparently well but suffer, fatigue, aching, swelling, and brain disturbances, expressed as mental and emotional upheavals. The specific patterns of disturbance which should invite a trial of the food-testing plan, and gluten restriction specifically are: Diarrhea, prolonged over three weeks, not associated with infections, or evidence of parasites or pathogenic bacteria in stool samples. Abdominal pain, especially if frequently recurrent, and associated with excess gas, and abdominal distensio (Irritable Bowel Syndrome). Anemia from iron, folic acid, or nutrient deficiency which is unexplained by blood loss, or dietary inadequacy, especially if associated with abdominal symptoms. Aching disorder, especially if the aching is generalized, associated with stiffness with inactivity, and dysethesiae ( odd burning, tingling sensations), and tender muscles. Any arthritic pattern, associated with diarrhea should be vigorously managed with gluten, milk, and egg restriction with careful testing of other foods for possible reactions. Fatigue, especially if associated with irritability, confusion or fuzzy-headedness, headache, and abdominal discomforts. Chronic asthma and rhinitis. Neurological symptoms which are unexplained by recognized abnormalities in physical examination and laboratory investigations. These symptoms include the above mentioned, memory disturbances, sleep disturbances, visual distortions, muscle weakness, and fasiculations (wiggly, jerking movements within muscles). A trial of gluten restriction is also appropriate in children with learning disability, schizophrenics, alcoholics, and patients with refractory mood disorders. Treatment of Grain Intolerance Exclusion of wheat, rye, barley, oats, and millet are the initial steps when gluten intolerance is suspected. The exclusion includes all the foods made with the flours of these common grains - Durham flour, Triticale, and Bugler are all excluded. The bran of these cereals is also excluded. A trial of an elimination diet lasting 3-6 weeks is sufficient to experience significant improvement in most bowel conditions. Longer periods of exclusion are required in conditions with chronic tissue inflammation, especially arthritis, and the skin disorders, eczema, and dermatitis herpetiformis, which sometimes requires an exclusion of several months before the skin condition remits completely. It is important to realize that multiple food intolerance are common and should be assumed, rather than assuming that single food intolerance's are the problem. NP does not consider it adequate therapy for a single food group to be eliminated, on the assumption that every other food will be well tolerated. Gluten restriction should be part of a more comprehensive dietary study, preferably in the form outlined in the food-testing plan. The best dietary plans are based on what is good to eat, more than what is bad to eat! No-one wants to be confronted with long lists of foods they must avoid. It is better to build a diet from scratch, emphasizing the positive. There is an entire universe of foods not related to milk, gluten-cereals, and eggs, the commonest problem foods! If improvement occurs, gluten restriction is maintained for many months at least before any effort is made to re-challenge with gluten foods. There are two exceptions, millet and oats. Millet is occasionally acceptable, early in an exclusion program although few people find it an attractive food, and it is potentially a trouble-maker. Oats is probably the best cereal to be re-introduced, and is often tolerated when wheat, rye, millet and barley are not. If gluten restriction is beneficial, oats may be tried after 2-3 months of abstinence. Some people, however, have specific and dramatic allergic reactions to oats, and acceptability must not be assumed. The major substitute for cereal grains is Rice The rice prolamine, orzenin, is different enough from gliadin to avoid immunological cross-reaction. Rice: Desirable Staple Food Rice is the staple food chosen for the core diet because it has low allergenicity, is versatile, widely available, and provides a carbohydrate caloric base to the diet. Rice comes in many varieties some of which are sufficiently different to be treated almost as separate foods. Converted white rice is preferred at the start of a core-diet program. Brown rice does contain more nutrients, and some prefer it by taste and texture; however, the husk also contains more potential problems. Rice-eating peoples generally polish their rice, removing the husk, because empirically the result is better. Again the nutritional arguments based on the nutrient content of foods outside of the body may be misleading! Brown rice may be well-tolerated, but should be introduced after tolerance for converted white rice is established. There are definite exceptions to this rule, as with all rules, since some patients do report better tolerance of selected varieties of brown rice. Rice can be utilized in a variety of forms, including rice cereals, rice pablum, puffed rice, rice-cakes, rice noodles, rice vermicelli, and rice flour (starch). Different rices vary sufficiently in taste, and texture to maintain culinary interest. Rice may be boiled with sunflower seeds, buckwheat, wild rice, other seeds, and legumes for added nutritional and culinary variety. All foods, including rice have the potential to be allergenic, however, and are not exempt from suspicion when adverse food reactions continue on a substitution diet. The most typical symptoms of rice intolerance are heavy fatigue, and chilliness. Rice may also produce the total grain syndrome, although this is uncommon in my experience. Following the core hypoallergenic diet plan, you will simply not miss cereal grains for a while, and find the variety and diversity of other vegetables, sufficient to sustain your interest and nutrition. The biggest challenge is to make the effort to choose different foods, and to prepare them attractively. Corn is less well tolerated than rice Our packaged, fast-food, and restaurant-food industries rely heavily on wheat flour to produce their products. The person on a gluten-free diet must make an extra effort to avoid these products, and to eat instead primary foods, including fresh produce, meats, fish, and rice. Most of my patients crave a carbohydrate food, if not a sugar food, then bread, buns, crackers, chips, nuts and so-on. Rice is a good alternative, being a starchy vegetable which turns sweet if you chew it for a while. Having rice available in a bowl in the refrigerator, mixed with vegetables, herbs, meats or fish offers an alternative to gluten-laden snack foods. Pasta is made with high gluten flour and is off our list of core diet foods. Again Rice is good alternative to pastas. Buckwheat Buckwheat is an interesting grain-like food to add to your diet, especially if Rice is not acceptable because of an adverse response to it. Buckwheat is not a grain, but belongs to the Polygonaceae family which includes sorrel, rhubarb and dock. Buckwheat is a seed, however, and resembles the grains in having a starchy endosperm, and can be ground into a flour, or cooked as a cereal, or prepared as rice. Buckwheat is not toxic to the celiac bowel, although some people react adversely to it. Buckwheat flour is disappointing for baking since it lacks gluten, the elastic, chewy component of bread. Other Alternatives to Cereal Grains Other starchy vegetables may stand in for grains. The potato is a starchy tuber, and potato starch can be used as a weak imitation of flour. Other roots are available, including Cassava an African vegetable which produces Arrowroot flour Tapioca is made by heating and moistening arrowroot. Flour is also made from Taro, a Japanese tuber, which is common in Hawaii where POI is a staple paste made from Taro roots. Soya beans are versatile and highly nutritious seeds which can be utilized as a flour as well. Tofu is the protein fraction of Soya beans, and is an inexpensive, nutritious food, used widely in the orient as a protein staple. It must be mixed with corn or another legume to produce a full complement of essential amino acids. The main problem with tofu is learning how to cook with it. Other legumes including, chick peas, lentils, peanuts are useful foods, on a gluten restricted diet, but have their own problems which must be considered before regular use of these foods is entertained. Each recommended food is still subject to testing, however, for each food may produce allergens or cause other problems. As with all foods in a sensitive person, the basic rule is - Find out how the food works in your body! Gluten-free diets specify food exclusions, including a variety of manufactured foods which contain Gluten. One generally can figure out what is not desirable by thinking of the probable origins of the food in question. Gluten exclusion does include malt, a barley product, and malt containing beverages (Postum, Ovaltine); beer and ale. Alcohol is usually excluded, although some tolerance may be found to selected wines, and distilled beverages. [Food for Celiacs; Campbell, J.A. : Journal of the Canadian Dietetic Ass'n., Jan '82 ; 43:1; 20-24; Gluten Free Cookbook: Leicht, L., RR#1 Box 54, Pender Island B.C. VON 2MO; Club House Foods 316 Rectory St. PO Box 788 London Ont. N6A 4Z2]. The focus of a gluten-free cookery is often on replacing gluten flour in baked goods with starches made from rice, arrowroot, potato, Soya beans, other legumes like chickpeas,and wheat starch (all the protein has been carefully removed). While baking can be done with these non-gluten "flours", the results are never as satisfying as with wheat flour. Gluten is the most desirable ingredient in flour for producing bread, and baked goods, and its absence is conspicuous. In many respects it is easier, kinder, and nutritionally wiser to forgo the baked goods in large measure and eat other foods. The task of changing your diet is very much like moving to another country and culture. You may try to bring all your old habits with you, and struggle to get all of the ingredients that you are used to forming into meals, or you can gracefully, and with a sense of adventure try the new cuisine. Certainly bakery foods are delicious and tempting, but so are creatively prepared rice, vegetable, fruit, fish, and meat meals. Even with multiple exclusions, an appealing, varied diet is within reach if you are willing to change your eating style. A book of recipes which de-emphasizes, cereal-grains, eggs, and milk is a great asset. The cookbook "Oriental Food Feasts" is full of recipe ideas from China, Japan, Indonesia, and India. One has to select recipes that utilize foods, appropriate to your dietary needs. The main thing is to be inspired to create and enjoy a new cuisine that will diminish your disturbances, sustain your interest in food, and provide balanced nutrition. [shepard, S.M., Oriental Food Feasts, Arco Publishing, Inc. New York 1979]. Vegetable selection and preparation is one of the prerequisites of a successful diet revision. The Tassajara cookbook is my favorite introduction to the subject [Tassajara Cooking; 1973 Zen Centre; San Francisco; Shambala Publications, Inc. Boulder, CO.] . Neuropsychiatry & Gluten Intolerance We have recognized that Gluten intolerance may involve the absorption of complete proteins like gliadin, or its peptide- fragments; anti-protein antibodies circulating in the blood, which form immune-complexes with the food protein, and provoke the release of mediators which may cause multiple disturbances in all body systems, and even tissue damage. These circulating problems may also influence brain function in a variety of undesirable ways. There is vague circumstantial evidence of an adverse grain effect on metal status. A family history of psychiatric problems is more common in patients with celiac disease. Celiac disease is genetically determined involving two or more concurrent genes. The genes involved are part of the immune-recognition complex, which determine the "Self" identity markers, protecting one's own cells from attack by the immune system. Celiac patients have an increased frequency of the serum histocomptability antigens (self-markers) of the HLA-B8 and HLA-Dw3 types. This genetic marker may indicate a predisposition for bowel absorption abnormalities or immunologic propensities, which result not only in celiac disease itself but other contingent abnormalities as well. Schizophrenia has been associated with gluten intolerance. The diagnosis, schizophrenia, describes a variety of differing individuals who belong to complex group of brain-disordered people. The schizophrenic brain distorts sensing, feeling, remembering, deciding, and acting. It is unlikely that schizophrenia is a single disease with a single cause. The milder, but similar brain dysfunctions which I observe commonly with gluten and other food intolerance, suggests that food allergy may play a role in schizophrenia, with gluten as a frequent triggering antigen. Dr. F.C.Dohan has consistently advocated a gluten-schizophrenia link for 20 years [Dohan, F.C., Cereals and Schizophrenia: Data and Hypothesis, 1966 Acta Psychiatr. Scand 42:125-42; Dohan, F.C. More, Celiac Disease as a Model for Schizophrenia, 1983 Biol. Psychiatry 18:561-4]. Dr. Dohan states: [" Many diseases are caused by genetically-deficient utilization of specific food substances. Perhaps the best studied example is phenyketonuria... far more common disorders, for example, atherosclerosis, and coronary heart disease, are strongly suspected of being due to genetically defective utilization of certain food constituents. " Similarly, considerable evidence indicates that the major cause of schizophrenia is the inborn inability to process certain digestion products of some food proteins, especially cereal grain glutens..."] Among Dr. Dohan's interesting an relevant recommendations is the idea of a "Gluten tolerance test". Such a test has not yet been developed, but is the sort of evaluation method that NP advocates in general. A gluten tolerance test could be initiated with routine evaluations before and after ingestion of grain foods. More sophisticated versions would measure gluten proteins and derived peptides in the blood, and would track the path of these molecules into organs, especially the brain. Finally the impact of these molecules would be evaluated by monitoring the function of the target organ in real time. I have been eager to do real-time monitoring of brain activity, topologically-computed in gluten-sensitive patients. These patients report changes in their PSYE, cognitive abilities, and emotional state which no researcher to date has documented objectively. The problem of adverse brain effects of molecules derived from food is a major under-recognized phenomenon of nutrition and molecular pathophysiology. Research in the next 10-20 years will, I am convinced, reveal a great deal about the extent, mechanisms, and importance of this consequence of eating to our mental status. Extracted from "Nutrition Therapy" by Stephen J. Gislason, MD For more information, please visit Nutramed's Web site at: http://www.nutramed.com/.
  19. SOYJOY's Mango Coconut Gluten Free Nutrition Bar is a tasty treat made from ground whole soy and just the right balance of real coconut and exotic fruits--yet is not too sweet. SOYJOY uses pure wholesome ingredients so you know exactly what is in these bars. The bars have more of a “cookie” texture which I find more enjoyable, and only pack 140 calories per bar. They are a bit on the smaller size in comparison to other bars on the market, but they did their job and kept me satisfied between meals, so I would put them in my "would recommend to others" category. For more info visit their site. Note:Articles thatappearin the "Gluten-Free Food & SpecialtyProduct Companies" section ofthis site are paid advertisements. Formoreinformation about this seeour AdvertisingPage.
  20. With three children, it feels like I am always on the go, so I am always on the lookout for nutritious gluten-free snacks that I can keep in my car or grab on my way out the door. However, recently I've grown tired of the typical flavor profile found with most gluten-free nutrition bars, but I really did want to find one that would excite my taste buds. I was particularly happy when I came across SOYJOY's pineapple flavored gluten-free bars. At first, I was a little worried that the pineapple flavor would taste artificial, or that it would have an overpowering pineapple taste. Thankfully, that wasn't the case! They use real dried pineapple and juice (what a concept), and that is only a small part of what this makes this bar a tropical treat. SOYJOY's gluten free pineapple bars have a nice texture that is moist with bits of dried pineapple, raisins and coconut, which gives it a pleasant chewy texture. It reminds me of a tropical cookie more than it does a nutrition bar. Unlike other gluten free bars, SOYJOY kept the ingredient list pure and simple so you know exactly what you are eating. They use ground whole soy, which is high in nutrients like protein, fiber and iron, and the bar is also rich in antioxidants and minerals. Although this bar was smaller than I had expected, it was just enough to keep me satisfied between meals. With only 140 calories per bar, 4 grams of protein, and 3 grams of fiber, this bar is certainly a little treasure that I will be sure to stock up on. They also are perfect to keep in the car or handy for travel since they hold up well in the heat. If you’re looking to be pleasantly surprised like I was, then I would recommend giving them a try. For more info visit: http://soyjoy.elsstore.com/view/category/27281-flavors/ Note:Articles thatappearin the "Gluten-Free Food & SpecialtyProduct Companies" section ofthis site are paid advertisements. Formoreinformation about this seeour AdvertisingPage.
  21. The USDA has a searchable nutrient database at: http://www.rahul.net/cgi-bin/fatfree/usda/usda.cgi FAST is Food Allergy Survivors Together- for support and info for those of any age with food allergies, sensitivities, and intolerance: http://foodallergy.what.cc or http://www.angelfire.com/mi/FAST/. Food and Drug Administration - Information about nutrition and drugs from the FDA: http://www.fda.gov/
  22. Celiac.com 11/22/2007 - Faced with a lack of data on growth rates and histological recovery in Asian children with celiac disease, a team of doctors led by Surender K. Yachna set out to evaluate the result of a gluten-free diet. The study findings appear in the Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology. The research team looked at forty-two children with celiac disease. The team chronicled weight and height as weight for height (WFH) and height standard deviation scores (HSDS) deviation scores. 25 of the 42 children underwent duodenal biopsies after 1 and 2 years, while 14 of the children underwent a third biopsy after being on a gluten-free diet for 3-7 years. The research team measured compliance with a gluten-free diet in the children using regular interviews & IgA anti-endomysial antibody estimation (EMA). The average HSDS was 3.3 + 1.6 with 76% showing an HSDS of <-2, with 60% of the children undernourished, with an average WfH of 81.6 + 5.7. Over an average follow-up span of 3.7 years, the HSDS improved significantly to -1.3 + 1.7, with 84% of cases achieving normal nutrition. The average growth rate was 13.9 cm for the first year, and 5.6 cm in the following years. The small bowel biopsies conducted upon diagnosis revealed Marsh IIIb subtotal villous atrophy in 18, or 72%, of the patients, and partial villous atrophy in 7, or 28%. Follow-up biopsy after 1-2 years revealed a change to partial villous atrophy in 17 of the 18 who originally showed Marsh IIIb subtotal villous atrophy. One patient showed a normal biopsy. All 7 patients who originally showed partial villous atrophy showed improvement. 81% of the patients showed negative results for IgA endomysial antibody. Follow-up biopsies conducted after 5 years of Gluten-free Diet showed improvement to Marsh I-II, but no normalization. From these results, the team concluded that most children with celiac disease exhibit normal nutritional uptake and growth patterns with the introduction of a gluten-free diet, and that most also show significant improvement in small bowel histology, but none show normalization, even after 5 years of a dedicated gluten-free diet. Journal of Gastroenterology Hepatology. 2007; 22(8): 1300-1305
  23. Celiac.com 09/01/2002 - Patients with celiac disease are 20 times more likely than the general population to have epilepsy and often have associated cerebral and cerebellar calcifications imaged by CT and MRI. Depression, dementia, and schizophrenia are all also common in persons with untreated celiac disease. Cerebellar degeneration with resulting ataxia (gluten-associated ataxia) is a known entity in Europe, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is currently recruiting subjects with ataxia to examine them for gluten sensitivity and celiac disease. Focal white matter lesions in the brain recently have been reported to occur in children with celiac disease and are thought to be either ischemic in origin as a result of vasculitis or caused by inflammatory demyelination. Parents of children with celiac disease have reported behavioral changes such as irritability, separation anxiety, emotional withdrawal, and autistic-like behaviors that all seemed to improve on a GFD. Although not scientifically validated, the GFD is now also being advocated for children with autism by several groups. Whether or not children with autism are at a higher risk for celiac disease or celiac children have a higher incidence of autism remains to be proven. However, children with Down syndrome, who often have autistic-like behaviors, are at higher risk for celiac disease. It has been hypothesized that gluten may be broken down into small peptides that may cross the blood-brain barrier and interact with morphine receptors, leading to alterations in conduct and perceptions of reality. The serologic tests can be divided into 4 different types of antibodies: antigliadin (AGA), antireticulin, antiendomysium (AEA), and antitissue transglutaminase (tTG). Each antibody varies widely in its sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (Table 2). Table 2 (from Pietzak et al, 2001, compiled data from multiple studies) Test Sensitivity Specificity PPV NPD AGA IgG 57-100 42-98 20-95 41-88 AGA IgA 53-100 65-100 28-100 65-100 AEA IgA* 75-98 96-100 98-100 80-95 Guinea pig tTG† 90.2 95 Human tTG† 98.5 98 * Patients older than 2 years of age. † IgG +IgA antibodies. The AEA IgA immunofluorecent antibody is an excellent screening test for celiac disease, with both a high sensitivity and specificity. This antibody was discovered in the early 1980s and rapidly gained use as part of a screening celiac panel by commercial laboratories in combination with AGA IgG and AGA IgA. Its major drawbacks are that it may be falsely negative in children under the age of 2 years, in patients with IgA deficiency, and in the hands of an inexperienced laboratory. Also, the substrate for this antibody was initially monkey esophagus, making it expensive and unsuitable for screening large numbers of people. Recently, the human umbilical cord has been used as an alternative to monkey esophagus. However, the subjective nature of the AEA assay may lead to false-negative values and unacceptable variability between laboratories. Because tTG had been first described as the autoantigen of celiac disease in 1997, it has been used to develop innovative diagnostic tools. The tTG IgA ELISA test is highly sensitive and specific, using either the commercially available guinea pig tTG or human recombinant tTG. The tTG assay correlates well with AEA-IgA and biopsy. However, it represents an improvement over the AEA assay because it is inexpensive and rapid (30 minutes), is not a subjective test, and can be performed on a single drop of blood using a dot-blot technique. Therefore, this test is ideally suited for mass screenings and in the future could be performed in the general practitioners office, much like the now routine finger-stick hematocrit. For the reasons outlined above, the IgA class human anti-tTg antibody, coupled with the determination of total serum IgA, currently seems to be the most cost-effective way to screen for celiac disease. AEA should be used as a confirmatory, pre-biopsy test, whereas AGA determinations should be restricted to the diagnostic work-up of younger children and patients with IgA deficiency, using the guidelines in Table 3. Table 3 Probability of celiac disease based on three antibodies in combination AEA IgA AGA IgA AGA IgG Interpretation + + + Celiac disease 99% probable + - + probable + + - Celiac disease probable + - - Celiac disease probable - + + Celiac disease less likely* - - + Celiac disease less likely* - + - Celiac disease less likely - - - Celiac disease very unlikely+ * If patient is IgA sufficient: AGA IgG > 100 warrants work-up of enteropathy. + If patient is on a gluten-containing diet. Celiac disease: AEA, antiendomysium antibodies: AGA, antigliadin antibodies.
  24. The Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (1996;22:414) published the abstracts of the forthcoming ESPGAN Meeting (June 4-8, 1996 in Munich, Germany). Troncone et al will present their work: Oat prolamines activate mucosal immune response in the in vitro cultured treated coeliac mucosa The conclusion is that oat prolamines are able to activate the T-cell mediated mucosal immune response in the coeliac jejunum, and represent a warning against the inclusion of oats in the diet of coeliac patients.
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