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Found 10 results

  1. Maybe it's already been discussed, but we stopped into a DD while travelling last weekend, and they had these little oatmeal pots for sale right near the register. I thought, "Oh, wouldn't it be great if I could have these for breakfast" (and yes, I know there are other brands, but there's a DD right near my office) I went to look to see if they were certified gluten-free oats - not only were they not certified, but the ingredients also listed barley and rye - the trifecta of trouble! Why they felt the need to add barley and rye to oatmeal, I have no clue. Now I know none of us would eat oatmeal that isn't certified, and we'd definitely check, but just wanted to make you guys aware.
  2. Celiac.com 09/02/2015 - Cereal maker General Mills is pulling the plug on its Gluten Free Chex Oatmeal. A spokesperson for General Mills confirmed that the product has been discontinued due to low sales. The company says it will make its final shipments of the gluten-free oatmeal in October. This constitutes an ignoble end for a brand that made its official debut last year. Chex Gluten Free Oatmeal was available in original, apple cinnamon and maple brown sugar flavors, and made without artificial flavors, colors, preservatives or high fructose corn syrup. The decision to discontinue Gluten Free Chex Oatmeal comes amid controversy regarding General Mills methods of sorting oats for its new gluten-free Cheerios. What do you think? Are you sad? Or are there too many good gluten-free choices to worry? Share your thoughts below.
  3. Celiac.com 04/19/2017 - Love Chicken Corden Bleu, but can't find a great gluten-free version? This recipe uses oatmeal and amaranth to create a lovely breading for chicken breasts stuffed with ham and cheese. They are low calorie, reasonably healthy, and certainly delicious. Ingredients: 4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves 6 slices Swiss cheese 4 slices cooked ham 1 egg 1 egg white 2 tablespoons oat flour, for dredging ⅓ cup gluten-free oats, lightly ground ⅓ cup amaranth ¼ teaspoon parsley flakes (crushed) ¼ teaspoon garlic powder ¼ teaspoon onion powder ¼ teaspoon sugar ¼ teaspoon oregano ½ teaspoon Italian seasoning, crushed ½ teaspoon ground black pepper (divided) ½ teaspoon salt (divided) butter, to coat pan Directions: Heat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Lightly coat baking dish with butter. Pound chicken breasts to about ¼ inch thickness. Sprinkle each piece of chicken on both sides with salt and pepper. Place 1 cheese slice and 1 ham slice on top of each breast. Roll up each breast, and secure with a toothpick. Season oat flour with a dash of salt & pepper in one bowl. Beat egg and egg white in another bowl. In a mixing bowl, combine salt, pepper, ground oatmeal, amaranth, sugar, other spices. Maintaining the roll form, carefully dredge the chicken roll-up through the oat flour, egg mixture and crumbs coating. Place in baking dish, and bake for 20-25 minutes, or until crispy and cooked through. Remove from oven, and place ½ cheese slice on top of each breast. Return to oven for 3 to 5 minutes, or until cheese has melted. Remove toothpicks, and allow to cool slightly, until cool enough to touch, but still warm. Cut rolls into pinwheels and serve.
  4. Hi everyone, I was diagnosed in November of 2013 with celiac and have been EXTREMELY strict (never ever cheat, possibly sensitive to trace gluten, etc.). I started hormonal birth control about 3 months after my dx and never really considered how the BC may be impacting my gut flora. For the last year and a half I've had my ups and downs of recovery; slowly figuring out what types of things are easier and harder for me to deal with or what creates symptoms. I decided recently to stop the BC, because I wanted to see how I felt physically without it. I didn't really notice much change except my face broke out from the drop in hormones. So, in the beginning I used to eat gluten free oats all the time for breakfast, but haven't in probably 6+ months. Tuesday I ate them for the first time (around 8am), and woke up the next day with an awful headache (the type I used to get from gluten). Wednesday morning was the first day of my first period off of BC. My period was EXTREMELY heavy, and around 11:30am I started to feel kind of weak, faint, shaky, etc. I did not feel well. My cramps were really bad and I was losing what felt like a LOT of blood compared to how my period used to be when I was on BC. The rest of that day I was miserable, and chocked it up to an extra heavy first "natural" period off of BC. However, Here I am 6 days later, still bleeding(!) and feeling light headed/brain foggy.The headaches aren't as bad, and I think are getting better. But every time I eat even a TINY bit, or drink water, I start feeling light headed again which makes me think this is more Celiac related and less menstrual or low-iron symptoms. Could it have been the oats? Is this just a side effect of a super heavy period in a sensitive body? I feel confused! Has anyone else experienced this? Has anyone else gone off BC and had a celiac-ish reaction? Any help is appreciated, please let me know what you think. THANK YOU! -Leanne
  5. I started using Nerium about 6 months ago after the company and the friend I buy it from both assured me that the products are all gluten free. Meanwhile I have definitely been feeling different - at times I think maybe I'm getting glutened somewhere and at others I think no, because I have such a consistent reaction to gluten and this hasn't been a full blown reaction. I started to narrow down my reactions to corn products or to at least be certain that corn exacerbates my pain so today I started going through all my products out of curiosity to see what may have corn lurking in it. I checked my Nerium labels and the day cream has oats in it!!! How can they claim their product is gluten free if it has oats? I ALWAYS react to oats in lotions, etc. I am waiting on a call back from the company - maybe they use certified gluten free oats? I do not have problems with gluten free oats but I can't use lotions from Bath and Body works or other places that have regular oats or oatmeal in them. I have to be very careful. I am really freaked out about this. I have not felt well at all since I started this product BUT I started it literally the day my husband and I separated and I"ve been under a ton of stress and have attributed my ill feelings to that. And I'm not having full blown typical gluten reactions. I am mortified that I never checked the label myself - I've never done that before. It's been a long three years of learning how to do this gluten free diet right and the last two years I haven't slipped up other than one time accidentally using a Bath and Body works lotion with oats. I immediately got hives head to toe and jumped back in the shower and scrubbed off with no further reaction. I am mortified. Does anyone have any experience with Nerium???
  6. If you think that there is nothing new when it comes to gluten-free oatmeal, we're happy to tell you that Convenient Nutrition's Original Gluten-Free Oatmeal is different from anything else on the market. In addition to being gluten-free, this oatmeal is made with 100% grass fed, hormone-free pure whey protein concentrate. If you're looking for a tasty alternative to traditional gluten-free oatmeal that can also provide the benefit of added whey protein, then you should try this product. It's also great to take with you to school or work for a quick, healthy meal or snack. Visit their site for more information: www.convenient-nutrition.com. Review written by Patricia Seeley.
  7. In the celiac world, there remains a long-standing controversy over whether to exclude oats and oat products from the list of "safe" gluten-free grains. When I was diagnosed with celiac disease, standard protocol recommended against including oats in a gluten-free diet, but more recent studies show that oats themselves are likely not the source of a celiac reaction. Instead, researchers now believe that the fact that milled oats are often contaminated with other gluten-containing grains has skewed diagnostic testing of reactions to gluten from oat products. The most recent scientific statements on the inclusion of a reasonable amount of oats (1 cup or less per day) in a gluten-free diet indicate that most individuals with celiac disease can actually tolerate uncontaminated oats. However, health professionals (including the American Dietetic Association) recommend that newly diagnosed celiac patients avoid oats until the disease is well-controlled with full resolution of symptoms and normal blood tests demonstrate that tissue transglutaminase levels (IgA tTG) are under control. Gastroenterologists also universally caution that introducing oats into your diet should only be done under the guidance of your physician. Federal food labeling laws and rules have incorporated this recent research and have not per se excluded oats from future "gluten-free" labeling, so long as the manufacturer seeking to dub its oat containing product "gluten-free" demonstrates that there is less than 20 parts per million (ppm) of gluten in that product, just as in any other. Thus, it seems the greatest hurdle to reintroducing oats to your gluten-free diet will be the shortage of mills and processing plants which produce certified "gluten-free" oats (and the resulting high cost of those few products)! I decided to try these outrageously expensive "gluten-free" oats myself to expand my baking horizons (of course, I discussed this with my physician first...). I doubt I will be sitting down to a big bowl of oatmeal anytime soon, since I still love my grits and they are probably 1/5 the price of gluten-free oats! However, as it would be challenging to make oatmeal-like cookies with grits, I dove into my $12 box of oats to see what happened. (Granted, as time goes by, companies like Bob's Red Mill are thankfully making gluten-free oats more prolific -- and thus, less expensive -- they will always be more expensive than my grits!) Just as an aside, I recently found a product available (finally) in the United States that would probably make a mean oatmeal cookie for those of you who are unable or unwilling to give the gluten-free oats a try. On one of my European adventures many years ago I thoroughly enjoyed German muesli made with rice flakes, but have since been unsuccessful finding them Stateside. Imagine my surprise when, on a slightly less exciting adventure last week, I discovered them at David's Natural Market in Columbia, Maryland! But back to the oats. I used them quite successfully in the first oatmeal-raisin cookie I have had since 1999, and I'm pleased to share the recipe with any of you who would like to try! The oats I used were Lara's and the rice flake substitute I found at my local organic market was made by Shiloh Farms. The cookies are soft, moist, chewy, full of cinnamon-y flavor and are almost totally gone, so I only had 2 left for a picture! I probably should have doubled the recipe, but my oats were so darn expensive! Oh well, these are worth splurging for next time. I hope you enjoy! ~jules Soft & Chewy Oatmeal Raisin Cookies ½ cup Earth Balance Buttery Sticks or butter ½ cup granulated cane sugar ½ cup firmly packed brown sugar 1 egg + 1 egg white ½ teaspoon gluten-free vanilla extract 1 cup All Purpose Nearly Normal Gluten-Free Flour Mix ½ teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 ½ cups gluten-free oats* ½ cup baking raisins** Cream the sugars and butter until fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time and thoroughly incorporate into the batter. Stir in the vanilla last. In a separate bowl, combine all dry ingredients (except oats), mixing well. Stir into the creamed mixture until integrated. Stir in the oats and raisins. Cover the bowl and chill until cold, at least 2 hours. Preheat oven to 350 F for static ovens or 325 F for convection. Roll the dough into tablespoon-sized balls and place at least 2 inches apart on a parchment-lined cookie sheet. Bake for 8 - 10 minutes, or until lightly brown. If you can wait, let them cool on a wire rack before removing. *Note: Not all people with celiac disease can include oats in their diets. For more information on whether they are appropriate for your diet please see our Celiac Disease and Oats section. **If you do not have baking raisins on hand, gently boil ½ cup of raisins in a saucepan with enough water to cover them. Drain, then add to your recipe.
  8. I am not a fan of any flavored gluten-free instant oatmeal, but Apple Pie Flavored Instant Oatmeal from Bakery On Main is the exception to my rule. There are no artificial flavors and they only use real dried apples and cinnamon which gives it a true homemade comfort taste. This instant oatmeal is also blended with chia seeds, quinoa, and amaranth for additional nutritional value but you would never know if you didn't read the ingredients. Just add hot water, which makes the individual packets perfect for traveling, or to keep on hand as a healthy snack. Visit their site for more info. Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
  9. If you're like me, the recent cold weather has you longing for the heat waves of the past summer. While grabbing a piece of fruit or even a refreshing smoothie on your way to work might fly during the summer, chilly winter mornings call for something much warmer before leaving the house. This is a recipe for an easy-to-prepare oatmeal dish that mixes plain oatmeal, Konsyl Original Fiber supplement, pecans, syrup and whatever else you enjoy to give it an extra savory kick. Harvest Oatmeal is also a great meal because it can accommodate many allergies. If you're lactose-intolerant like me, changing the type of milk used in the recipe to coconut, almond, lactose-free or another version won't affect the final taste. And if you're allergic to pecans or other nuts, they can be left out without subtracting from the deliciousness of the recipe. Feel free to substitute or add any other garnishes of your choice - the maple syrup in this recipe is a personal favorite. I actually prefer the taste of sugar-free syrup, so if sugar is a concern for you, that’s one easy way to modify your diet. Your mom always told you that oatmeal was a great meal, and she's right. Plus, making your own oatmeal feels great because the end result is delicious AND you can mold it to your own specifications (shh, don't tell anyone how easy it is!). The oats warm you up right away, the Konsyl helps you feel full and aids your digestion, and the maple syrup and other delicious toppings mean that breakfast feels more like a treat rather than a chore. And, because there’s no real cooking involved, just heating, this is a great meal for those on the go. Hope you enjoy! Ingredients: 1 cup cooked, old fashioned gluten-free oatmeal 1/4 cup canned pumpkin puree 1 tbsp milk (coconut, almond or otherwise) 1 tbsp pumpkin pie spice 1 tsp real vanilla extract 1 rounded tsp Konsyl Original psyllium fiber Maple syrup, pecans, dried cranberries or raisins for toppings, if desired Directions: Heat cooked oatmeal in pan on stove top or in microwave until just warm. Add the milk, pumpkin, spices, vanilla and Konsyl Original. Mix well and reheat. If it is too thick, add 1 tbsp hot water at a time and stir until desired consistency is reached. Top with syrup, nuts and dried fruit to your liking. Makes two servings.
  10. We recently received gluten-free oatmeal cookie samples from Deborah Kayes Cookies, and their "Oatmeal Chocolate Pecan" cookie was calling my name! Before I go any further with this review, I have to say that these are not your ordinary gluten-free cookies. These cookies are loaded with certified gluten-free oats and contain no flours or refined sugars. In addition to this most of the ingredients are organic. Their cookies have a bit of a rustic look since they are all hand made, and they are huge compared to most cookies on the market (gluten free or not). Each cookie is also individually wrapped which makes it convenient for those times when I have to rush out the door with the kids, or need to keep something in my desk for a snack. I took my first bite and was not sure what to expect...but I absolutely loved the soft, almost "just out of the oven" texture. The cookie was not lacking in taste or texture and all the flavors were beautifully balanced. I fell in love with Deborah Kayes Cookies, and since they use wholesome ingredients I can now satisfy my cookie craving guilt free! For more information about Deborah Kayes Cookies, visit their Web site: http://deborahkayes.com Note:Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Product Reviews" section of this site are paidadvertisements. For more information about this seeour Advertising Page.
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