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Found 16 results

  1. Celiac.com 09/25/2018 - In a patent application that could have a huge impact on the gluten-free industry, General Mills, Inc. has described its method and system for removing foreign, gluten-containing grains to establish gluten-free oats. Current FDA guidelines require all products labeled gluten-free to have a maximum gluten content of 20 parts per million (ppm). Published August 23rd, patent application No. US 20180236453 A1 details a method for producing oat grains with gluten levels below 20 ppm and, more preferably, below 10 ppm. Natural oats generally do not contain gluten, but after harvest, transport and storage, large batches of raw oats may contain small amounts of gluten-containing grains, such as wheat, barley, rye and triticale. These can sometimes occur at levels exceeding 20 ppm. The General Mills patent application describes a method of arranging mechanical oat sorting operations in series, or in both series and parallel operations. The multi-step process best includes width grading, multiple length grading steps, along with a potential de-bearding step. The resulting oats will be gluten-free to under 20 ppm, and possibly to under 10 ppm, and are suitable for the production of gluten-free oat food products, including cereals and granolas. To receive a patent, General Mills will have to prove that their process does what they say it does. A successful patent for General Mills could have a huge effect on the gluten-free oat foods industry. For one, it may allow General Mills to become a major supplier of gluten-free oats for other manufacturers. The benefits of larger scale, more economical gluten-free oat production could include more, and more readily available, gluten-free oat products, along with lower prices for both manufacturers and consumers. Stay tuned for more developments on this and related stories. Read more at Justicia.com
  2. Celiac.com 09/13/2018 - Bob’s Red Mill finds itself under fire by two women who claim the company knowingly hides the presence of an allegedly cancer-causing weed killer in its steel cut oat and rolled oat products, and falsely advertises those products as healthy. Tamara Frankel and Natasha Paracha filed a federal class action in San Francisco, alleging that parent company Bob’s Red Mill Natural Foods knows that its oat products contain or likely contain glyphosate, but fails to disclose it on the label. The women cite a recent report by the Environmental Working Group, an environmental research and advocacy group, which claimed to find traces of controversial herbicide glyphosate in Cheerios, Quaker Oats and other oat-based breakfast foods. The women contend that Bob’s uses labels such as “gluten free,” “wheat free” and “purity tested,” which lead consumers to falsely believe them to be healthy. Both U.S. and European regulators have concluded that glyphosate is safe, while that World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies it as a probable human carcinogen. Bayer subsidiary Monsanto, maker of the glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup has faced numerous lawsuits over its product. A San Francisco jury recently found that exposure to Roundup caused the cancer of a school groundskeeper, and awarded him $289 million in damages. Shortly after that verdict, the Environmental Working Group released a report claiming that 31 of 45 oat-based food samples tested positive for glyphosate, and that levels exceeded safety limits of 160 parts per billion. EWG applies a more stringent standard than the 2 mg/kg/day of glyphosate standard used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the 1.1 mg per day standard used by the State of California. Frankel and Paracha are represented by Patricia Syverson of the San Diego law firm Bonnett, Fairbourn, Friedman & Balint. Stay tuned for more developments on this and related stories.
  3. Celiac.com 12/18/2018 - Evidence compiled by Quaker Oats shows that 4% of the purity protocol oats the company uses to make "gluten-free" oatmeal products are contaminated with trace amounts of gluten. Overall, these batches may contain under 20 ppm gluten, and thus be considered gluten-free. But somehow, isolated kernels of wheat, barley or rye flakes were making their way into the final oatmeal products and onto store shelves. Because these kernels were rolled flat the same way as the oats, it was possible for one of these flakes to find its way into a bowl of otherwise gluten-free oats, and to render the bowl over the 20 ppm standard, meaning it is technically not gluten-free, according to FDA standard. Quaker found a solution in a stricter testing method. The testing method used by Quaker mirrors the testing method recently adopted by the CFA. Under that method, "oat groats are collected from gluten-free oat production following a robust attribute-based sampling plan then split into 75-g subsamples, and ground. R-Biopharm R5 sandwich ELISA R7001 is used for analysis of all the first 15-g portions of the ground sample. A less than 20-ppm result disqualifies the production lot, while a greater than 5 to less than 20-ppm result triggers complete analysis of the remaining 60-g of ground sample, analyzed in 15-g portions. If all five 15-g test results are less than 20 ppm, and their average is less than 10.67 ppm (since a 20-ppm contaminant in 40 g of oats would dilute to 10.67 ppm in 75-g), the lot is passed. Most oatmeal is made from rolled whole oats. That means that, even with just 4% gluten contamination, products made with whole oats, even rolled oats, can contain pockets of gluten that might render a given serving over the 20 ppm standard. Because Quaker, or their oat supplier, lacks a sorting process for eliminating or reducing gluten-contamination in its raw purity protocol oats, and because its oatmeal is minimally processed, the problem of loose individual flakes of wheat, barley or rye remains unsolved at the manufacturing level. This is true for Quaker in a way that is not true for General Mills. No matter how much Quaker mixes rolled oats, a single wayward flake of wheat, rye or barley will remain intact and eventually turn up in a serving portion. That's true, even if it's just an isolated flake. That means that Quaker must look for a solution in its supply chain. So, Quaker's approach makes sense for products made with whole oats. However, the challenges faced by Quaker in making gluten-free oatmeal are substantially different than the challenges faced by General Mills in making a product like Cheerios. That's because of differences in the processes used to make the two products. Because General Mills uses a process to sort its raw oats to below 20 ppm allowable gluten, and because it then grinds the raw oats into oat flour, there is no danger that intact flakes of wheat, rye or barley will make their way into any given serving. The flour is mixed thoroughly, and, thus, any flour from the wayward oat flake is now blended evenly into the rest of the batch. The oat flour is then mixed further with other ingredients to become the raw material for making Cheerios. So, it's extremely unlikely that Cheerios would suffer from the types of gluten "hotspots" that Quaker found in their supposedly gluten-free purity protocol oats. The process greatly increases the likelihood that any gluten would be evenly distributed into the final product, and thus be gluten-free below 20 ppm at the serving level. Essentially, the two studies by scientists at Quaker show a couple of things. First, whole oats, and products made with whole oats, even those labeled gluten-free, even those which are harvested as "purity protocol," can contain isolated pockets or "hotspots" of gluten. This may mean that these products can cause symptoms in people with celiac disease. People with celiac disease should be vigilant about these products. Trust your gut and eat accordingly. Second, the data gathered, and the conclusions reached, by the Quaker scientists regarding Quaker's efforts to produce gluten-free oatmeal, have little or no connection to General Mills and the process used to make Cheerios. It would be a mistake to project Quaker's challenges onto General Mills. For its part, it seems that General Mills has actually solved the challenges of removing wheat, rye and barley from oats to reach levels below 20 ppm, and to manufacture products that reflect that gluten-free status. General Mills has solved the challenge at the manufacturing level in a way Quaker has not. For all its refined testing procedures, Quaker is still reliant on its suppliers to deliver gluten-free oats. Somewhere, somehow the problem of quantifying the gluten content of raw oats and rendering that level to be within gluten-free standards still has to be solved. Quaker is relying on oat growers and suppliers to solve the problem, to develop a way to quantify and reduce the gluten contamination levels of raw "purity protocol" oats. Perhaps Quaker might benefit from optical sorting technology, or other processes that allow them to exert more control over their finished product at the manufacturing level? Celiac.com is not alone in saying that optically sorted oats likely safe. That view is also held by the Gluten Intolerance Group. Read articles on the original studies by scientists at Quaker Oats at Food Chemistry, and the International Journal of Food Science Technology. Sources: Food Chemistry. Volume 240, 1 February 2018, Pages 391-395 Int J Food Sci Technol, 52: 359–365. DOI: 10.1111/ijfs.13288 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ijfs.13288/full General Mills Describes the Success of its Gluten Detection System
  4. Hey all! I just at the avocado toast at Le Pain Quotidien with their gluten free bread. Since it wasn't made in a gluten free facility I shouldn't have eaten it but options were limited and I was on vacation. However, I noticed that one of the first ingredients are oats and they don't specify if they're gluten-free oats. I haven't been able to find any information online about whether they are gluten-free or regular oats. Does anyone know?
  5. I have had lupus fibromyalgia ibs or spastic colon since 1998. Now i had allergy testing labs on blood. Im allergic to gluten, almonds, oats, barley, cadida yeast, aspiragillys(molds), broccoli, cabbage, clams goats milk, kidney pinto navy and soybeans, pork, sesame, spinach and canola oil. I don't know what to eat now. I've always eaten say at olive garden or anything and had terrible stomach pains like labor. Then run to the bathroom. Or constipation i cant go for a week or so. I tried spark vitamin drink had gluten, soy powder allergic. Health bars larabars gluten. My weight can be 129 one week 120 next or go to 104 fast. Not sure what to do now. How can regain my life back? Could i have celiac not ibs? I have 3 other auto immune system diseases. Any food resources would be great and vitamins with no soy or gluten. Plus beverages. Ive had hives a month now from my almond butter gluten and vitamin drinks lol steroids and epi pen. Oh and high cholesterol. So everything i ate to lower that im allergic to. Plus a list of secondary allergy foods a mile long.
  6. Celiac.com 08/17/2017 - Anyone who knows their oats will tell you Nairn's is a familiar name in the industry. The iconic Scottish grocery brand began making that name as Nairn's Oatcakes in 1896, when John and Sarah Nairn set up a village bakery in Strathaven, Lanarkshire. More than 120 years later, it has grown from cottage industry to large-scale production, with about 150 workers, and revenues in excess of £27 million this past year. But consumer tastes, and challenges in production, retail and marketing all press the firm to adjust operations to keep pace, according to managing director Martyn Gray. Gray says that, as business has grown, the company has "had to look at specialists in each department because, it's not just a small family business now, we are a good medium-sized business that needs to adapt to the markets that we're now in." In addition to its core oatcakes and biscuits, the firm also sells products under the Simmers header, including Abernethy and Butter Biscuits, with an additional gluten-free range providing a key growth driver. Nairn's has said it is in the process of investing £6m in a new gluten-free manufacturing operation after the existing one proved unable to meet growing demand. However, with manufacturing becoming increasingly automated, the company saw a notable reduction in both permanent and temporary staff. In addition to being the UK's top oatcake producer, Edinburgh-based Nairn's, has become the UK's second-largest gluten-free producer according to Mintel, having entered the sector in 2010 from what Gray calls a "standing start." Gray says the new gluten-free facility will meet demand and "bring a pipeline of new products currently in development to market. In turn, this will protect and enhance the sustainability of the entire business." Gray admits that such expansion is a double-edged sword, offering both the chance to accelerate revenues, but with other players keen to take a cut themselves. "The market is very, very competitive," he says, but sees its long-term viability as highly positive. Nairn's also said the UK gluten-free market was worth nearly £500 million and was expected to see growth of more than 40 per cent in coming years. Much of that growth will be driven by gluten-free oat products. Read more at: Scottsman.com
  7. Celiac.com 05/12/2017 - The Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) is an organization that certifies gluten-free products and food services. The GIG's latest definition and requirements for the product purity protocol was published by AACC International. The purity protocol defines the way of growing, harvesting and processing oats to keep them safe from gluten contamination, GIG's CEO, Cynthia Kupper, said. Until now, the term lacked a uniform definition, allowing companies who used it a degree of wiggle room. Under the new standard, companies will now have to provide documentation that prove the processes they follow are based on the newly standardized definition in order to use the claim 'purity protocol oats,' said Kupper. "Given the continuing growth of the market for gluten-free products, it is essential that terms like 'purity protocol' be defined for both food manufacturers and consumers," she added. Farmers collect higher fees for growing and managing oats under purity protocol conditions, and those higher prices usually get passed to consumers. Currently, the gluten-free products most commonly contaminated by wheat are granola and cookies that contain oats, Kupper told Bakery and Snacks. In addition to providing more confidence for consumers, the new protocol could lead to a price decrease, partly due to an expected increase in demand for products made with pure oats. That demand is partly driven by added consumer confidence in purity protocol products. In addition to tightening the purity protocols for oats, GIG plans to further standardize gluten-free screening for other grains, including rice, quinoa and other grains, according to the organization. Keep an eye on purity protocol oats to see if the predictions of lower prices, higher consumer confidence and safer oats hold true, and if so, whether those protocols can be applied to grains like rice and quinoa. Read more at BakeryandSnacks.com.
  8. Celiac.com 05/01/2017 - To avoid symptoms, and promote full gut healing, people with celiac disease should follow a strict gluten-free diet. Oats might increase the nutritional value of a gluten-free diet, but their inclusion for people with celiac disease remains controversial, and data have been conflicting. A team of researchers recently set out to determine the safety of adding oats to a gluten-free diet for patients with celiac disease. The research team included María Inés Pinto-Sánchez, Natalia Causada-Calo, Premysl Bercik, Alexander C. Ford, Joseph A. Murray, David Armstrong, Carol Semrad, Sonia S. Kupfer, Armin Alaedini, Paul Moayyedi, Daniel A. Leffler, and Elena F. Verdú. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine, Farncombe Family Digestive Research Institute, McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, the Leeds Gastroenterology Institute, St. James's University Hospital in Leeds, UK, the Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences at the University of Leeds in Leeds, UK, the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester in Minnesota, US, the Celiac Disease Center at University of Chicago Medicine in Chicago, Illinois, US, the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University, New York City, New York, US, and the Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, US. For their systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical and observational studies, the team searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases for clinical trials and observational studies on the effects of including oats in gluten-free diet of celiac patients. The studies reported patient symptoms, serology test results, and histologic assessments. The team used the GRADE approach to assess the evidence. Out of 433 total studies, the team found 28 that met their criteria for analysis. Of these, 6 were randomized and 2 were not-randomized controlled trials comprising a total of 661 patients. The remaining studies were observational. All randomized controlled trials used pure, uncontaminated oats. Their results showed that celiac patients who consumed oats for 12 months experienced no change in symptoms, histologic scores, intraepithelial lymphocyte counts, or serologic test results. To provide a more authoritative conclusion, they call for clinical double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trials, using commonly available oats sourced from different regions. Source: Gastroenterology
  9. Celiac.com 12/28/2016 - Quaker Oats UK has launched several gluten-free oat products, including a free-from variant and a yogurt-based breakfast pouch range. Available since late September, the new gluten-free offering comes in a 510g can of Traditional Rolled Oats, and a 350g box of 10 Oat So Simple packets. "Leading a gluten-free lifestyle is important and necessary for some people, and so Quaker has created options to meet consumer demand," says PepsiCo's Jeremy Gibson, marketing director, nutrition. The launch follows the introduction earlier this month of Oat & Fruit Breakfast, an on-the-go pouch line made with fruit purée and natural yogurt that comes in three flavors: Red Fruits, Apple & Cinnamon, and Blueberry. The products will be sold exclusively at UK's Tesco stores, and will be promoted with an aggressive social media campaign and in-store marketing. Calling Oat & Fruit Breakfast "unique to the market" Duncan McKay, PepsiCo's senior marketing manager for grains UK, expressed excitement over the new product range, which come "as demand for convenient breakfast options is at a peak." Stay tuned for more information on gluten-free products from Quaker, and other manufacturers.
  10. This article was just released (12/19/2016) by the Gluten Free Watchdog (a kind of Consumer Reports for the gluten-free community): https://www.glutenfreewatchdog.org/news/quaker-researchers-publish-a-second-study-highlighting-the-difficulties-associated-with-testing-oats-for-gluten-contamination/ Your thoughts?
  11. I am sure this has been talked about a lot on here, but I still wanted to ask the question. When visiting my mom for 2 weeks she made oatmeal and added gluten-free brewers yeast to it. There were other different foods I ate at her home, such as quinoa. I got really ill and I decided that I needed to find a doctor to give me thyroid medications since gluten was hurting my thyroid. Did that and the meds almost killed me. So I stayed off all grains and decided that this was my new life. Ok, so I decided later I could try and add a grain at a time and "see" how I felt. I have not added back the three listed items and I am scared to. I have read that any type of brewers yeast is bad for most of us. I loved oats and I don't recall having issues with it before, but I am scared. I am really enjoying being pain free and no skin issues and thyroid issues. Please offer your thoughts, suggestions, and any advice. Thanks
  12. Hello everyone. Desperate for answers! 6 years ago I started with two end expulsion when I ate wheat, it started with spaghetti. Then shortly after that, 2 months maybe, barley had the same effect. A few months after that rye followed then spelt. Now I can't eat oatmeal doesn't matter if it's gluten free, I end up with cramps and pain. So I just avoid. Went to dr - he tested me (blood test) for celiac whilst I had been gluten free for over a year. Obviously it was negative. I'm also lactose intolerant. Fast forward to two years ago,4 years of gluten free, tried the gluten challenge to have a blood test done again. 6 weeks one slice of bread a day, it was horrific! I ended up with blisters on my bot and elbows. My elbows looked like DH - blood Negative. So my question is, I got glutened four weeks ago, I had blisters on my thighs and fingers this time. Sides of my fingers, pin prick type blisters. I was as sick as a dog, both ends. I had a stool sample done and it revealed lots of fat globules which explains my floating waste but no bacteria/parasites. I have hypothyroid, secondary adrenal insuffiency all well managed. No hashis. Otherwise ok. Other than the horrendous brain fog since the gluten incident. I had high IgA in my saliva but low in blood. Should I opt for biopsy? Apparently I'm not allergic which is good, as I have multiple allergies. appreciate any kind of advice you can offer! thank u!
  13. Hi all--- I know this is long but I'm really grateful for any response even if you just skip to the end... This question is about my colonoscopy results and upcoming endoscopy but here is a bit of background on why I am being tested. I am a 21 year old currently in the process of testing for celiac disease. I exercise almost every day, drink plenty of water, and eat plenty of fiber. I have had serious constipation since December of last year (only going if I took a laxative and often not even then, so maybe once a week). Between March of last year and this past December, I had occasional constipation every few months and before March of last year never had constipation and actually frequently had the opposite problem, which my regular doctor thought was because of Lactose intolerance or anxiety (I first went to the doctor for stomach discomfort in 6th grade). That same March I also began having horrible panic attacks that became frighteningly frequent last December at the same time that the constipation really kicked up. My period also became irregular that March despite the fact that I am on the pill. Changing pills did not help. I followed a dairy-free diet for about 9 years before the constipation began, though I was never tested for lactose intolerance. At the suggestion of a friend who has celiac disease, I tried going gluten free in February of this year and began to have BMs without any laxatives within four days of starting the diet. Within a few weeks my panic attacks had also stopped, and I seemed to be able to eat way more food than I ever had before and was even losing weight. I had always thought I had a really slow metabolism. What a great time that was for at least a little while. During this one-year period from March of 2014 to March of 2015 I also saw my doctor several times, but was always told that the digestive problems were the result of a panic disorder, not the cause and that I needed to relax. I saw a therapist and was prescribed Ativan---- which medication, btw, doctors then loved to say was the cause of my constipation even though the constipation came first. Anyways, the gluten free diet seemed to be fixing the constipation as well (not perfectly) until a few months ago (April). I then suggested to my doctor again that I might be celiac, but she looked at my arm and said that she wouldn't test me because I didn't have a rash. She told me for yet again to relax and eat fiber. Getting no help from her, I then started taking magnesium which really really helped for about a month (even though the poop was liquid and pretty much undigested) until a couple of months ago (May), when I got backed up again. I then cut out my daily packet of "gluten-free" oats. After that it felt like months of piled up BMs were pouring out of me every day for about a week. My panic attacks after cutting out oats have completely gone away, and as long as I take the magnesium (less now so it's not liquid) and eat gluten and lactose free I have a relatively normal BM every day. Testing By now you have probably realized the issue with only being tested now, months after going gluten free. I went to a gastroenterologist about three weeks ago. She found blood in my stool and what she called a "pocket" in my rectum from straining. I got blood tests for all sorts of deficiencies and for celiac as well as a stool sample taken for parasites. No surprise on a gluten free diet, these all came back normal. About a week later I had an anorectal manometry (to test my pushing ability). The day after that I had a colonoscopy. Both were normal. Here is my first question: About a week after the colonoscopy I was told that the biopsy they had taken was positive for celiac, and that I would need to come in for an endoscopy in two weeks. Is this possible? I have heard that sometimes doctors are able to reach the end of the small intestine (which my report said that they had) during a colonoscopy and to take a biopsy from there. I have also heard that only an endoscopic biopsy can diagnose celiac disease. Here is my second question: My gastro doctor knows that I have not been eating gluten for a long time and has never mentioned to me that I need to eat gluten before any of these tests. My endoscopy is in exactly one week. After my blood work came back negative, I tried eating gluten, thinking f*** it. I got a really bad headache and what felt like the worst sort of menstrual cramps, as well as a lot of gas. The small BM I had the next day was very painful, and I had only had a few whole wheat crackers. Either way I wanted to test what would happen if I went back to eating as much gluten as I used to and I drunkenly ate three pieces of white bread one night. The next day my voice was gone and I could hardly move. It felt like I had appendicitis-- I'm sure the alcohol was a contributing factor though I definitely did not have enough for it to cause this much pain, as I rarely ever have lasting hangovers. My hands were shaking like they used to after a panic attack and I thought I might be about to have one. After that little experiment, I decided I would eat gluten free even if the test results were negative. Two days of gluten-free eating went by and I was beginning to feel human again when I got the call about the colonoscopy and scheduled the endoscopy. Again, no mention of needing to eat gluten before the test. Should I eat gluten before the test? For obvious reasons I'm a little nervous about the idea. A few hours ago I ate about two pieces of bread just in case when I call tomorrow they say that I need to. Within two hours I was very gassy and began to get a headache (Can a reaction even happen that fast or is this all in my head?). Also, is it too late to eat gluten before the test? I did technically start last Thursday though it was only a few crackers a day until the drunk bread eating debacle on Saturday night, after which I had a two day break.
  14. I started using Nerium about 6 months ago after the company and the friend I buy it from both assured me that the products are all gluten free. Meanwhile I have definitely been feeling different - at times I think maybe I'm getting glutened somewhere and at others I think no, because I have such a consistent reaction to gluten and this hasn't been a full blown reaction. I started to narrow down my reactions to corn products or to at least be certain that corn exacerbates my pain so today I started going through all my products out of curiosity to see what may have corn lurking in it. I checked my Nerium labels and the day cream has oats in it!!! How can they claim their product is gluten free if it has oats? I ALWAYS react to oats in lotions, etc. I am waiting on a call back from the company - maybe they use certified gluten free oats? I do not have problems with gluten free oats but I can't use lotions from Bath and Body works or other places that have regular oats or oatmeal in them. I have to be very careful. I am really freaked out about this. I have not felt well at all since I started this product BUT I started it literally the day my husband and I separated and I"ve been under a ton of stress and have attributed my ill feelings to that. And I'm not having full blown typical gluten reactions. I am mortified that I never checked the label myself - I've never done that before. It's been a long three years of learning how to do this gluten free diet right and the last two years I haven't slipped up other than one time accidentally using a Bath and Body works lotion with oats. I immediately got hives head to toe and jumped back in the shower and scrubbed off with no further reaction. I am mortified. Does anyone have any experience with Nerium???
  15. I think I've been glutened...but I'm not sure. I've been feeling better daily until today. Had the big D after a week and a half without. Stomach cramping, achy joints, fuzzy head. Awful...tired...etc. I ate out for the first time on Saturday...felt fine then, Sunday and yesterday. Then today it's awful. Could it take this long? I've looked at everything else I've eaten and prepared myself and I don't see anything. Thanks
  16. Hi everyone, I've been strictly gluten free for about 1 year. I do not have diagnosed celiac disease but I know I was very sick before I cut it out. When I went gluten free I noticed I felt much better but about 3 months in noticed a soy intolerance. Then came lactose then casein and most recently chicken, potato, Certified gluten-free oats, quinoa and corn. Corn has been the bane of my existence. I can not tolerate even distilled white vinegar (derived from corn). That said, I feel so much better. Normal and healthy most of the time. I am shocked and amazed by how healthy and happy I feel after having years of debilitating migraines, IBS, and neuropathy. These foods gone, I feel great! So, I am by no means complaining but seriously....did anyone ever get their foods back? Obviously gluten is NEVER reintroduced. But I do miss potato. I miss soy (tamari please!). I realllllly miss cheese! I know one year is not that long for healing but I have to ask, have you been able to reintroduce your intolerances? How long did it take for you? Also, for those of you with other grain intolerances, ever reintroduce those? I am really curious as to other grain intolerances like corn. Would be nice not to worry about salt (iodized table salt has corn as a binding agent). Thanks everyone!
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