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Found 7 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/15/2013 - For gluten-free Americans who love donuts, life just got a little bit better. That's because Dunkin’ Donuts has announced plans to offer gluten-free donuts and muffins in all its US stores by the end of the 2013. The Canton-based company field tested gluten-free products in a handful of locations around Boston and Miami, news of which generated considerable social media buzz. This news is certainly much heralded by many gluten-free eaters, so it will be interesting to see what the response is like, and how Dunkin' Donuts fares. Certainly, the timing is right, with the market for gluten-free goods continuing to see double digit growth, and predicted to top $6.6 billion by 2017. Moreover, a recent survey by market research firm The NPD Group, Inc. found about one in three American adults say they want to reduce or eliminate gluten from their diets. For many people, Dunkin’s wheat-free cinnamon sugar doughnut clocks in at 320 calories, compared to 260 calories in a regular glazed doughnut. The gluten-free blueberry muffin is 400 calories -- 60 calories less than the standard version. The company said the pastries will be packaged separately to avoid cross-contamination. Those who must eat gluten-free, and might want to grab a donut now and then, will be pleased to learn that Dunkin' Donuts says that each donut will be individually wrapped to prevent contamination.
  2. Celiac.com 11/28/2016 - The title of my article might seem a little shocking to most of the celiac community. Why wouldn't I want restaurants to offer high quality, safe meals to those who suffer from celiac disease or from non-celiac gluten intolerance so they could also enjoy dining out with their family and friends like everyone else? It's not that I don't want restaurants to offer gluten-free options: I do. But, I want them to be high quality, high integrity, and offered by a properly trained and knowledgeable staff. Otherwise, I truly don't think your establishment should bother offering gluten-free options to your diners and guests. The truth is that genuinely gluten-free dishes should be more than just replacing a bun, or using a corn or rice version of pasta in your dishes. Claiming to be "gluten-free" or "celiac-friendly" needs to go much further than just claiming such or simply swapping a product for your gluten-free diner. Without the benefit of training and education, many restaurants are not going to take into account any cross-contamination factors such as where the food is prepared, or who has touched it (and what did they touch last?) or where the plate was prepped and cleaned. It doesn't consider the air-borne flour coating almost every surface of a bakery or kitchen, and, it certainly doesn't involve investigating ingredients in the finished dishes for "hidden" sources of wheat, rye, or barley whose derivatives (such as malt or "flavorings") might be lurking around the kitchen and in prepared foods. There are so many sources of cross-contamination that are simply not explored, or may not even be known by a dining establishment. Unless a typical restaurant or bakery staff is well-versed and knowledgeable in what to look for, the questions to ask, and the proper procedures that will ensure a safe dining experience for gluten-free guests, and until all of the sources of cross contamination are explored and eliminated, it is highly doubtful that a gluten-free dish is truly gluten-free at all. With the FDA's recent updates to the gluten-free standard, restaurants, bakeries and dining establishments need to start following suit. Anyone offering a gluten-free meal should be aware that not only are their customers expecting adherence to the 20ppm of gluten (or less) standard that has been accepted as the standard for certifying something is gluten-free, but that the FDA expects their dining establishment to live up to that standard. As with any product that comes to market with a claim, restaurant menus are subject to abide by the same guidelines. For instance, if you claim something is "reduced fat", then it better, by all means, be reduced fat from the original version of the same dish. The same principal applies to gluten-free dishes with the standards taking full affect in the summer months of 2014. If your restaurant claims it is gluten-free, then it better be gluten-free, and not just "assumed" gluten-free. Living in blissful ignorance can not be an option for restaurants or for any establishment offering gluten-free products. As with any other food allergy or intolerance (FAI) there can be dire consequences for not adhering to procedures for safe preparation and service of food. Not to mention the damage that can be done to an establishment's reputation should the word get out that their integrity or food knowledge is questionable. Personally, I believe restaurants have a lot to gain in terms of offering gluten-free meals, or menu options in their establishment. I believe that restaurants who establish—and enforce- gluten-free procedures to eliminate cross contamination, accidental exposure, and provide training to their staff can benefit greatly in terms of business growth and satisfied repeat guests and their referrals from gluten-free diners to both gluten-free dieters and "traditional" diners alike. Gluten-free diners, just like all diners, place a great deal of faith and trust in people who prepare their meals at restaurants, diners, bakeries and cafes. With this great measure of trust being established at the first encounter with a restaurant guest, it pays to educate everyone from host/hostess to head chef on the proper way to handle gluten-free meals, and for that matter, all FAI's. That is why I recommend that until you are completely certain that your food is gluten-free, and that your staff is in complete compliance with your establishment's gluten-free policy, it is probably better that your establishment NOT offer gluten-free menu options. Those with gluten intolerance and celiac disease would appreciate your honesty and your integrity in doing so. The good news is that we'll be willing to become your dinner guests when you can honestly say that your kitchen staff, servers, management team, and even your host or hostess are educated, trained, and 100% on-board with providing a safe gluten-free experience for all of us. Trust and integrity go a long, long way for those of us with special dietary needs.
  3. Celiac.com 03/09/2012 - Subway stores in Oregon are in the process of rolling out gluten-free sandwich buns and gluten-free brownies as regular menu items statewide, according to Subway spokesperson Cathie Ericson. For millions of Americans who avoid gluten, due to celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, eating out can be a constant challenge. Having easy access to a safe, tasty, low-cost gluten-free sandwich is like the Holy Grail for some of those folks. For many, being able to grab a gluten-free Subway sandwich would be a major step toward vanquishing the challenges of eating gluten-free. Subway understands that being gluten-free "…really cuts down on fast-casual dining options, particularly sandwiches,” said Michele Shelley, Subway board member and owner. Many people were excited to read about Subway's early testing of gluten-free products in selected areas. Many were equally excited to hear about Subway's commitment to getting their gluten-free sandwich offerings right, from start to finish. For example, Subway’s wheat-free sandwich rolls and brownies are produced in a dedicated gluten-free facility and are individually packaged. Subway staffers are trained to prevent cross-contamination during the sandwich-making process. Moreover, a single employee will prepare a gluten-free sandwich order from start to finish. Other features to Subway's gluten-free process include single-use knives and eliminating contact between traditional sandwich rolls and other ingredients including meat, cheese and vegetables. Oregon is one of a handful of states where Subway first tested gluten-free products in selected areas. The current statewide roll out in Oregon comes after a successful test in Bend and Portland, Subway restaurants, and seems to signal Subway's desire to offer gluten-free menus to diners. “Subway is known for being a leader in healthy fare, and we are excited to embrace these gluten-free menu items for those who can benefit from them,” Shelley told reporters. Source: http://community.statesmanjournal.com/blogs/menumatters/2012/01/27/oregon-subways-add-gluten-free-menu-options/
  4. Celiac.com 11/06/2014 - The results of restaurant supply-chain co-op SpenDifference’s menu price survey indicate that more than half of all restaurant chains plan to offer gluten-free menu items in 2014. The third menu price survey said nine percent of surveyed restaurants are already offering organic products, 36 percent use local products, 53 percent offer light- and low-calorie options, and 55 percent have gluten-free items. The report echoes earlier reports that the strong and steady uptick in the demand for gluten-free foods, and is reinforced by SpenDifference president and chief executive officer Maryanne Rose, who says that the growing demand for low-calorie and gluten-free menu items will “be with us for a long time. Many specialty restaurants, now offers gluten-free menus. To get an idea of your gluten-free options, Gluten-free Guide HQ offers a good list of 75 Essential Gluten Free Restaurant Menus from a number of major food purveyors that runs the gamut from fast food and casual to more upscale.
  5. Celiac.com 05/24/2012 - The old, cafeteria-style dining campus hall is fast becoming a thing of the past. Today’s students are bringing their more sophisticated palates and health-related concerns to campuses and schools are stepping up to accommodate them. Driven by these new consumer demands, and more creative management, more and more campus dining halls are beginning to resemble restaurants, featuring selections that reflect world cuisine and emerging food trends. Students are "becoming more sophisticated customers," says Joe Wojtowicz, general manager of Sodexo, Inc.'s Crossroads dining room at Concordia University Chicago in River Forest. These days, it's common for students to press staff about food options, especially questions about celiac disease, gluten-intolerance, food allergies and vegetarian preferences. More and more are moving to accommodate dietary restrictions like vegetarian, Kosher or halal, or putting gluten-free or lactose-free choices on their menus. From higher quality ingredients, such as free-range eggs, humanely raised meats, and fresh, locally produced produce, dining halls are increasingly offering more exotic options like Cuban, Chinese, or Thai dishes. “It’s not just spaghetti for Italian and tacos for Mexican,” said Rachel Warner, marketing director for the National Association of College and University Food Services. Many colleges are hiring restaurant chefs, dieticians and nutritionists to oversee the dining hall operations and some are even customizing meals to meet individual student needs or preferences. “I think that the shift in dining is really driven by the consumers. They come in with higher expectations and are increasingly savvy about the world around them and the different kinds of food,” says Warner. More and more, this higher level of student awareness and expectation is driving camp offerings. At DePaul University, students were asked to vote on whether a particular brand of hummus was suitable at their school. At Northwestern University, students recently enjoyed a “cruise night” offering food of the tropics. At Loyola University Chicago, students drink hormone-free milk. Students at Northewestern University can choose from numerous kosher options. One university in Texas offers a vegan dining hall and a Colorado school has a station dedicated to Persian cuisine. According to Warner, “Students are coming in and they do want to have a little bit more say and more options.” These dining hall improvements are yielding benefits not just to students, but to their communities. In 2011, Wheaton College was ranked by the Princeton Review as having the best campus food in America. The dining services are run by Bon Appetit management company. Raul Delgado, general manager of Wheaton College’s dining services, says “When you look at this, the farthest thing from your mind is a cafeteria…This is a restaurant. And like any restaurant, it’s open to the general public. Esther Howerzyl, 68, who biked to Wheaton from St. Charles with a group of friends, says the food is "very organic health food and I like all the seeds, the variety of seeds.” Do you have experience with these evolving campus dining trends, especially as they relate to gluten-free options? If so, please comment below. Also read a related article: Schools Offering Better Food Options for Students with Celiac Disease, Other Food Concerns.
  6. Celiac.com 03/26/2012 - People with thyroiditis and untreated celiac disease may suffer from reduced thyroid-stimulating hormone levels, a new study has found. Those people may require supplemental doses of thyroxine to normalize their thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. That study, which appears in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, also indicates that following a gluten-free diet seems to require less thyroxine to push thyroid hormone back toward normal levels. More and more, people diagnosed with celiac disease, show atypical symptoms, many without the classic gastrointestinal complaints that traditionally characterized celiac disease. The study team notes that the need for higher thyroxine doses may offer a clue to such atypical celiac disease. Leader of the study, endocrinologist Dr. Marco Centanni, of Sapienza University of Rome, in Italy, encourages doctors to consider the "possibility of the presence of other occult autoimmune disorders…every time they see a patient with autoimmune thyroiditis." Dr. Centanni adds that doctors should consider malabsorption, and possible celiac disease, whenever standard thyroxine doses fail to reduce thyroid-stimulating hormone levels to under 2.5mU/L. For Dr. Centanni, an individually-tailored dose of thyroxine that fails to hit the therapeutic target is a powerful "tool to unveil occult gastrointestinal disorders." Dr. Centanni and his team analyzed replacement T4 doses in 35 hypothyroid patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and atypical celiac disease. They also looked at 68 patients with Hashimoto's alone. After an about five months of thyroxine doses averaging 1.31 mcg/kg/day, the 68 patients without celiac disease reached target serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels of a median of 1.02 mU/L. After receiving similar thyroxine doses over a similar span of time, the 35 patients with celiac disease showed much higher hormone levels, averaging 4.20 mU/l, and just a single patient had reached the target level. The team then encouraged patients with celiac disease to adopt a gluten-free diet, and found 21 willing patients. When they measured those 21 patients again after an average of 11 months, they found that the patients had returned to target serum hormone levels on a average thyroxine dose of 1.32 mcg/kg/day, which is similar to the dose originally used in the non-celiacs. To get normal target serum hormone levels in the 14 celiac patients who did not comply with the gluten-free diet, the team had to increase the dosage substantially. From these results, the researchers conclude that malabsorption of thyroxine may offer an as yet undiscovered way detect celiac disease in certain cases. Source: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 2012
  7. Celiac.com 06/12/2006 - Starting with the May 2006 school lunch menu, the Mendon Upton Regional School District will be serving gluten free meals. Mr. Paul Daigle, Superintendent of Schools commented: “Food allergies have become an increasingly important area of concern in our public schools. The district is committed to provide all students with a safe and healthy school lunch experience.” Anne Crisafulli, the district’s Food Service Coordinator, put her can-do attitude to work to identify and provide for gluten free meals to be available for the children in the district who have celiac disease and/or are gluten sensitive. Some of the gluten free offerings that will be available in May include, bagel lunches, pizza, taco bar, brunch, pasta, grilled cheese, peanut butter & jelly sandwich, turkey wraps and hot dogs. Most of these items traditionally contain gluten, which is a protein found in oats, wheat, barley and rye. After much research, Ms. Crisafulli made specific product purchases to be used in the gluten free meal preparation and hopes to expand it’s gluten free options in the future. Gluten Intolerance and Sensitivity is becoming more prevalent among our nation’s children and our small community is no exception. Gluten intolerance or sensitivity results in adverse reactions after consuming the protein gluten. Consumption of gluten, for those who are intolerant or sensitive to the protein, results in intestinal damage that can lead to a multitude of complications due to malabsorption of nutrients. Both disorders involve varying symptoms that can include headaches, joint & muscle pain, mood swings, skin conditions, abdominal pain, constipation and diarrhea. Treatment involves a strict lifelong adherence to a gluten free diet. The support offered by the Mendon Upton Regional School District to children is a paramount success to those with gluten intolerance. It is estimated that 1 in every 133 people in our country has celiac disease, and many are yet to be properly diagnosed. This new initiative will allow children with dietary restrictions the opportunity to identify menu items that are safe for their very strict diets. This will help them to prepare for the real life choices they will need to make now, as they grow and as they become adults and go out into the world. A new parent group will be formed to identify and address gluten and other common food issues that are of concern in the Mendon Upton public school system. The kickoff meeting is scheduled for May 18, 2006 at 7:00 in the Miscoe Hill School Auditorium. For more information please contact one of the chairpersons: Diane Mercier (508) 529-4433, Shirley Warren (508) 529-3552 or Daniele West (508) 634-3936.
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