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Found 4 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/04/2017 - Once upon a time, maintaining a gluten-free diet was a challenge, especially for college kids. In many ways, it still is, as college students face numerous challenges that others do not. However, things are changing, and much of that change is being driven by colleges and universities seeking to better serve their students with food sensitivities and allergies. More and more, colleges in America are doing more to step up their food services for their students with food allergies and sensitivities. Cornell University has quietly worked to phase gluten out of its main dining hall. For the last several years, students and others have been enjoying various gluten-free meals at Risley Dining Room without fanfare. From rice noodles at stir-fry station, to gluten-free flour in the brownies and biscuits. A recent gluten-free facility certification from Kitchens with Confidence, allowed Cornell to re-introduce Risley Dining as a 100% gluten-free, tree-nut-free, and peanut-free kitchen. In 2016, Kent State University became the first university in the country to feature an entirely gluten-free dining hall on campus. The move to convert Kent State's Prentice Café to gluten-free facility has helped the university emerge as a leader in gluten-free campus food services. Meanwhile, out west, Mills College is working hard to make sure the meals are good to eat and good for the planet. Their dining facility serves local and organic ingredients as much as possible, and prepare food from scratch in small batches to keep dishes fresh and healthy. Mills' website describes their food as "fresh, locally sourced, and delicious." Food and drink website the Daily Meal regularly lists Mills in its 75 Best Colleges for Food in America, while the Princeton Review consistently names Mills as one of the greenest colleges in the nation. Other colleges and universities that earn high gluten-free food marks are Baylor University, Tennessee University, Georgetown University, Oregon State, Bard College, University of Wisconsin Madison, Southern Methodist University, University of Arizona, Ithaca College,Texas A&M, University of Notre Dame, University of New Hampshire, SUNY Potsdam, and Tufts University. Source: thecampanil.com
  2. Celiac.com 01/25/2013 - Faced with calls to accommodate rising numbers of gluten-free parishioners, more Christian churches and are increasingly offering a gluten-free option for those rising numbers of gluten-free members who seek to take communion. A number of churches in the US and the UK have already taken measures to accommodate gluten-free members with gluten-free and low-gluten offerings. And while there is still a bit of wrangling in the Catholic church in the US about the acceptable gluten-content of communion wafers, it looks like more traditional Catholic and Anglican churches in Australia are now joining ranks in offering a gluten-free communion option for their parishioners. According to Mike Grieger, whose Australian Church Resources organization sells gluten-free and low-gluten altar bread to more than 2000 churches of different denominations, the trend is changing the way churches practice communion. Generally, for Protestants, offering gluten-free bread for communion seems to pose little, if any, religious difficulty, as the bread and the wine are regarded as mere symbols of the body and blood of Christ. Because Roman Catholics believe that the bread and wine, with the priest's blessing, actually become transformed into the savior's body and blood, the adoption of completely gluten-free offerings has caused issues. That is because church doctrine requires bread made from unleavened wheat, as they believe Jesus used at the Last Supper. To address the issue, nuns at the Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration in Clyde, Missouri have created an extremely low-gluten wafer that is now being offered by numerous Catholic churches. It appears that official policy in the Catholic church can differ across geographic regions. For example, the Catholic Diocese of Columbus recently said that gluten-free wafers don’t meet Vatican standards because they don’t contain wheat, but that parishioners can still receive full communion by taking the wine. However, in Australia, Father Ken Howell, Catholic Dean of St. Stephen's Cathedral in Brisbane, says that gluten-sensitive parishioners could now bring their own gluten-free wafers. Meanwhile, more Protestant churches are moving to accommodate not just gluten-sensitivity, but other dietary sensitivities as well. One example is Ashgrove West Uniting Church in Brisbane, which began to offer their congregation bread that gluten-free, nut-free, dairy-free and vegan friendly about a year and a half ago, according to church secretary Julie Hultgren. What to you think? Should churches accommodate their gluten-sensitive members with gluten-free communion options? Share your comments below. Meantime, stay tuned to hear the latest in gluten-free trends in communion.
  3. Celiac.com 06/11/2012 - For many religious individuals, eating sacramental bread at the altar to commemorate the Last Supper of Jesus Christ is a cornerstone of religious practice. Until very recently, nearly every church version of the Eucharist, the holy consumption of bread and wine to honor the body and blood of Christ, featured standard bread or communion wafers that contained gluten. The problem for many with gluten intolerance or celiac disease, is that the only known treatment is to avoid foods containing gluten. That includes bread, pasta, cakes, pizza dough, lunch meat, beer, as well as the bread for the Eucharist. However, with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance on the rise, and with awareness of both of these condition also on the rise, many churches are moving to make accommodations for these people. Led by a few churches at the vanguard, more and more churches are making moves to accommodate the growing numbers of people with gluten-intolerance by offering gluten-free variations on the traditional loaf of bread or communion wafer. "It's another way we can welcome people to the table," said Glenn Catley, senior pastor of Asbury United Methodist Church in Salisbury, UK. The church's annual meeting has offered a gluten-free bread for years, he said. But it wasn't until about a year ago that the church began doing the same during its Communion. In addition to the wheat or pita bread available at most of the serving stations, parishioners may also opt for rice cakes. Dietary accommodation is something of a tradition in the Methodist church, Catley noted. Among Protestants, offering gluten-free bread for communion seems to pose little, if any, religious consternation, the bread and the wine merely represent the body and blood of Christ. To Roman Catholics, however, who believe that the bread and wine, with the priest's blessing, are actually transformed into the savior's body and blood, the adoption of completely gluten-free offerings has caused issues. That is because church doctrine requires bread made from unleavened wheat, as they believe Jesus used at the Last Supper. Even though church advocates downplay any controversy, and note that parishioners may still receive the full sacrament by drinking the wine, efforts are being made to provide a full sacrament to those with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance. To that end, nuns at the Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration in Clyde, Missouri have created an extremely low-gluten wafer that is now being offered by numerous Catholic churches. Source: http://www.delmarvanow.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20120331/LIFESTYLE/203310341/Area-churches-adopt-gluten-free-options-altar?odyssey=nav%7Chead
  4. Celiac.com 01/25/2012 - Perhaps due to a combination of public information efforts and higher diagnosis rates, but awareness of celiac disease, gluten-free and other food sensitivities is slowly spreading to schools across the nation. This reality, coupled with general student interest in a greater variety of healthier food options is driving a change in both vocabulary and offerings at campuses around the country. Go to many schools today, and you may hear terms like 'gluten-free,' 'celiac-friendly,' or 'allergen-free' thrown around liberally with more common standbys like 'kosher,' 'organic,' 'vegetarian,' and 'vegan.' Students are "becoming more sophisticated customers," says Joe Wojtowicz, general manager of Sodexo, Inc.'s Crossroads dining room at Concordia University Chicago in River Forest. These days, it's common for staff to field questions about food options before students even arrive on campus, especially questions about celiac disease, gluten-intolerance, food allergies and vegetarian preferences. For these students, access to accurate nutritional information is all the more important given their need to avoid foods that trigger allergies, Wojtowicz says. "All our menus are on the Web, and they click through an item to learn the nutritional content," he adds. "And we make sure we label our offerings if they contain nuts." These benefits extend to students with celiac disease and gluten intolerance, as well. Overall, more students are requesting foods that are more nutritious and healthful than in the past, says Travis Orman, senior director of dining services with Chartwells Educational Dining Services at Elmhurst College in Elmhurst, which serves up to 3,200 meals a day. Students are also demanding more options. That means a change in even the most basic offerings. For example, many colleges are finding that students enjoy ethnic specialities. Orman says authentic Mexican is a favorite on his campus. "We honed in on the authentic cuisine and developed 8 to 10 options where the flavors just burst in your mouth. We launched Serranos Mexican Grill in September, and it's been very well received." Offerings include a burrito bowl taco, taco salad and barbacoa, a beef slow braised in garlic, lime, chiles and spices, then shredded, Orman says. Many college students prefer meat-free options, says Wojtowicz, so Crossroads always offers at least two to four vegetarian menu options, including cheese pizzas, grilled cheese sandwiches and cheese quesadillas. Other items, such as grilled Provencal vegetable sandwich or black bean and cheese quesadilla also appear. At CUC, Wojtowicz has responded to a growing interest in Mediterranean dishes with items like paella, spanakopita, Spanish tapas and other regional favorites. Some schools are taking food offerings to the next level by serving vegetables grown in local community gardens. North Central College in Naperville is among schools that has turned to harvesting a community garden to supply a portion of the produce for its dining operation. The North Central College Community Garden is now in its second year, and benefits from the efforts of nearby residents, who tend their own plots of land. Because of that support, those gardens "produce some of the fresh vegetables and fruits used in the college's salad bar and deli bar," says director of residence life Kevin McCarthy. The school then labels those items at the dining hall so that students know they are choosing sustainable options grown at the Community Garden. Source: http://www.chicagotribune.com/special/educationtoday/chi-edtoday-dining-110311,0,7648384.story
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