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Found 11 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/09/2017 - More and more people are avoiding gluten these days, even folks who do not have a medical reason to do so. Perhaps looking to take advantage of the popularity of gluten-free dieting, or perhaps hoping their targets are easily fooled, one cheeky police department in California is offer to run a gluten check on people's meth. The Newark Police Department posted the offer on their Facebook page. The offer reads: "Is your meth laced with deadly gluten? Not sure? Bring your meth down…and we will test it for you for free!" Of course, however bad may be, and meth is plenty bad, it likely contains no gluten. Also, gluten aside, anyone who takes the police up on the offer will likely be arrested, which seems to be the point. The post appeared on Thursday, and by Saturday, had been shared over 80,000 times, and received more than 14,000 'likes.' According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, over 12.3 million Americans age 12 and older have tried meth at least once. So far, no word from the Newark PD about whether their plan has actually found any gluten in meth, or led to any arrests. Read more at HuffingtonPost.uk.
  2. Celiac.com 01/08/2015 - The Israeli Defense Forces has announced plans to provide gluten-free meals for its troops with celiac disease. The IDF will soon provide its soldiers with gluten-free battle rations, which means that combat service will be an option for Israelis who suffer from celiac disease. Until last September, Israelis with celiac disease were exempted from army service, but permitted to volunteer in non-combat roles. That all changed in June, when Defense Minister Yaalon announced changes to the rules, which now permit soldiers with celiac disease to receive a 97 profile ranking, the highest possible, allowing them to join combat units. Currently, Israeli draft centers get about 250-300 people each year with celiac disease. So, while the overall numbers are small, the news is big to those affected, who can now get the gluten-free support they need to pursue full military careers, as they choose. Source: Jewish Press
  3. Celiac.com 12/24/2014 - Market research firm RNRMarketReseach has announced the release of its EpiCast Report: Celiac Disease - Epidemiology Forecast to 2023. Written and developed by Masters and PhD-level epidemiologists, the EpiCast Report uses literature review and primary research results, consistent definitions and methodology to offer in-depth, high quality, transparent and market-driven analysis of celiac disease trends in the six major markets (6MM) of the US, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and UK through 2023. The report provides an overview of the risk factors, comorbidities, and the global and historical trends for celiac disease in these markets. The report also includes a 10-year epidemiological forecast for the total prevalent cases of celiac disease segmented by sex and age (0-19 years, 20-29 years, 30-39 years, 40-49 years, 50-59 years, 60-69 years, and over 70 years), along with a 10-year epidemiological forecast for the diagnosed prevalent cases of celiac disease in the 6MM. The report includes forecast data on the number of total prevalent cases of celiac disease in the 6MM, which it projects to grow at a rate of 3.92% per year, to a total of more than 8 million cases, through 2023. The report also projects the number of diagnosed prevalent cases in the 6MM to increase by 4.61% over the next decade to 1.11 million cases in 2023. Anyone interested in the details may purchase a copy at EpiCast Report: Celiac Disease – Epidemiology Forecast to 2023.
  4. Celiac.com 10/14/2014 - A new drug designed to prevent gluten uptake in the gut is showing some promise for the treatment of celiac disease. The drug, larazotide acetate, significantly reduced symptoms in a large double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The drug prevents gluten uptake by closing tight junctions in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The drug is intended to supplement, rather than replace, the gluten-free diet that makes up the standard celiac disease treatment. Specifically, the drug is designed to help patients who continue to experience symptoms despite efforts to avoid gluten, and will not allow celiac patients to eat gluten with impunity. Some experts are cautioning celiac disease patients against high expectations. Joseph A. Murray, MD, of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minnesota, said that, even if the drug is approved, it would not be a cure for celiac disease, but just another way to control symptoms for those already on a gluten-free diet. Daniel Leffler, MD, director of research at the Celiac Center of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, in Boston, called the news “exciting.” Dr. Leffler predicted that, if approved, the drug would be a useful addition to standard celiac disease treatment. Source: Gastroenterology and Endoscopy News. SEPTEMBER 2014 | VOLUME: 65:9
  5. Celiac.com 10/24/2012 - Doctors can face challenges when attempting to diagnose celiac disease in patients who have already begun a gluten-free diet, and/or when the results of tests are inconsistent. To better understand this problem, a group of researchers set out to assess the benefits of an in vitro gliadin challenge. The research team included Raffaella Tortora, MD, Ilaria Russo, PhD, Giovanni D. De Palma, MD, Alessandro Luciani, PhD, Antonio Rispo, MD, Fabiana Zingone, MD, Paola Iovino, MD, Pietro Capone, MD and Carolina Ciacci, MD. The study cohort included 57 patients without celiac disease, 166 patients with untreated celiac disease, 55 patients with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet, and 59 patients with challenging diagnosis. The team provided all patients with endoscopy for collection of duodenal samples, which served for the diagnosis of celiac disease and for the in vitro evaluation of the gliadin-induced mucosal expression of seven inflammatory markers: PY99, ICAM-1 (intercellular cell adhesion molecule), HLA-DR, CD3, CD25, CD69, and transglutaminase 2 IgA. Diagnostic work-up for celiac disease included the search of specific serum antibodies. Researchers asked patients in the challenging diagnosis group to stop gluten-free diet to facilitate the search for these antibodies under untreated conditions. They used the area under the receptor-operated curve (ROC) for statistical analyses on accuracy. For patients with and without celiac disease (not including those on a gluten-free diet) HLA-DR offered the best accuracy for diagnosing celiac disease (area under ROC = 0.99). Combining the data from the HLA-DR with data of other markers did not increase test accuracy. The team found similar results in the 39 patients of the difficult diagnosis group undergoing the search celiac disease-speciï¬c antibodies under untreated conditions. In vitro testing of mucosal HLA-DR to gliadin is an accurate tool for the diagnosing celiac disease, and also works in patients who are hard to diagnose. Source: Am J Gastroenterol 2012; 107:111–117; doi:10.1038/ajg.2011.311; published online 27 September 2011
  6. Celiac.com 12/05/2012 - Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are play a pivotal role in helping our bodies tolerate self-antigens and dietary proteins. Interleukin (IL)-15 is a cytokine that is overly present in the intestines of patients with celiac disease. Studies have shown that Interleukin (IL)-15 does not interfere with the generation of functional Tregs, but causes human T cells to resist Treg suppression. To better understand how control of effector T cells by regulatory T cells is inhibited, a team of researchers compared Treg numbers and responses of intestinal and peripheral T lymphocytes to suppression by Tregs in celiac disease patients and in a control group. The research team included N.B. Hmida, M. Ben Ahmed, A. Moussa, M.B. Rejeb, Y. Said, N. Kourda, B. Meresse, M. Abdeladhim, H. Louzir, and N. Cerf-Bensussan. They are affiliated with the Department of Clinical Immunology and the Institut Pasteur de Tunis in Tunis, Tunisia. For their study, the team isolated intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs) from duodenal biopsy specimens of patients with celiac disease and in a control group. The team then purified CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes (Tregs) from blood. By analyzing anti-CD3-induced proliferation and interferon (IFN)-γ production in the presence or absence of peripheral Tregs, they were able to test responses of IELs, of LPLs, and peripheral lymphocytes (PBLs) to suppression by Tregs. The team used flow cytometry to measure lamina propria and peripheral CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ T cells. They found that, although patients with active celiac disease showed significantly increased percentages of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ LPLs, they also showed less inhibited proliferation and IFN-γ production of intestinal T lymphocytes by autologous or heterologous Tregs (P < 0.01). IEL for subjects with celiac disease showed no response to Tregs. Also, the team noted resistance of LPLs and PBLs to Treg suppression in patients with villous atrophy who had substantially higher blood levels of IL-15 compared with patients without villous atrophy and controls. From their results, the research team concludes that effector T lymphocytes in people with active celiac disease become resistant to suppression by Tregs. This resistance may result in loss of tolerance to gluten, and to self-antigens. Source: Am J Gastroenterol. 2012 Apr;107(4):604-11. doi: 10.1038/ajg.2011.397. Epub 2011 Nov 22.
  7. Celiac.com 09/12/2012 - A team of researchers recently evaluated tioguanine as a treatment for refractory celiac disease type I. The very small study indicates that tioguanine, a thiopurine derivative, offers easy, efficient treatment for refractory celiac disease, compared with current treatment regimens. The research team included G. J. Tack; D. P. van Asseldonk; R. L. J. van Wanrooij; A. A. van Bodegraven; and C. J. Mulder. Refractory celiac disease type I is a form of celiac disease in which patients show resistance to a gluten-free diet, and suffer persistent or recurring intestinal villous atrophy, along with symptoms of malabsorption. Currently, the most common treatment for refractory celiac disease type I relies on corticosteroids, though azathioprine is also sometimes used. However, this small recent study shows that tioguanine might be better tolerated and more effective, in part because of its simpler metabolism towards bio-activation. For their study, the research team set out to assess how well patients with refractory celiac disease type I tolerate tioguanine, and how effective it is in relieving symptoms. The team studied a group of twelve patients with refractory celiac disease type I, who were treated with tioguanine between June 2001 and November 2010, including a follow-up period of at least 1 year. The team assessed and recorded adverse events, laboratory values, 6-thioguanine nucleotide concentrations and rates of both clinical and histological response at baseline and during follow-up. They noted that the average tioguanine treatment lasted 14 months. Ten patients tolerated long-term tioguanine treatment, while two patients discontinued treatment due to adverse reactions. The team found no nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver. Follow-up showed clinical and histological response in 83% and 78% of patients, respectively. Overall, patients decreased corticosteroid reliance by 50%. Because of its higher histological and similar clinical response rates compared with current treatments, tioguanine seems to be a good drug for treating refractory celiac disease type I. Source: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. 2012;36(3):274-281.
  8. Celiac.com 08/13/2012 - Research has indicated that giving small amounts of wheat-rich food to people with celiac disease, who are on a gluten-free diet, will trigger interferon (IFN)-γ-secreting T cells in the bloodstream. These T cells react to gluten, and can be easily detected. However, very little is known about how this procedure might be reproduced in the same patient groups that underwent two, or more, gluten challenges. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the reproducability of this short wheat challenge method for detecting immune an response to gluten. The research team included A. Camarca, G. Radano, R. Di Mase, G. Terrone, F. Maurano, S. Auricchio, R. Troncone, L. Greco, C. Gianfrani. They are affiliated with the Institute of Food Sciences-CNR, Avellino Department of Paediatrics and European Laboratory for the Investigation of Food-Induced Diseases, University of Naples, Naples, Italy. They evaluated fourteen celiac patients in remission who consumed wheat bread for 3 days, along with thirteen patients who underwent a second gluten challenge after 3-10 months on a strict gluten-free diet. The team then analyzed the immune reactivity to gluten in peripheral blood by detecting IFN-γ both before and 6 days after patients began a a gluten-inclusive diet. They found that gliadin-specific IFN-γ-secreting CD4(+) T cells increased significantly by day 6 of the first challenge. These cells arose as prevalently human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ restricted and with a phenotype of gut homing, as suggested by the expression of β7-integrin. They also saw a reaction to gliadin after the second wheat consumption, although the responses varied by individual at each challenge. The study showed that a short wheat challenge offers a non-invasive approach to investigate the gluten-related immune response in peripheral blood of people who are sensitive to gluten. Moreover, the study showed that the procedure can be reproduced in the same subjects after a gluten wash-out of at least 3 months. The results of this study mean that we can likely expect this procedure to find its way into clinical practice in the future. Source: Clinical and Experimental Immunology. 2012 Aug;169(2):129-36. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2249.2012.04597.x.
  9. I have a big issue with what I believe to be a misleading headline in a recent joint press release by Domino's Pizza and the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA)...here is the headline: "Domino’s Pizza Becomes First National Pizza Delivery Chain to Offer Gluten Free Crust" When you read the release further, starting at the 5th paragraph, which many people will never get to, it says: "While Domino’s new Gluten Free Crust is appropriate for those with mild gluten sensitivity, Domino’s and the NFCA do not recommend it for those with celiac disease. Domino’s and the NFCA found that while the crust is certified as gluten free, current store operations at Domino’s cannot guarantee that each handcrafted pizza will be completely free from gluten." So my question is this: How can the NFCA, a national organization dedicated to supporting celiacs, actually get behind this? Domino's is obviously a big corporation that has decided it wants to cash in and profit on the new gluten-free gold rush, but they cleary don't want to spend the money that it would take to make their pizzas truely gluten-free, and safe for celiacs. The Designations area of the NFCA's web site begins with: "Restaurants that complete GREAT Kitchens earn a designation based on their ability to meet gluten-free needs and avoid cross-contamination with gluten." Just below this it describes their "Green Designation" and its "Amber Designation," and describes its Amber Designation as follows: "This level requires ingredient verification and basic training of wait staff and managers. Kitchen practices may vary with this designation, level one of the tier system, meaning those with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity should ask questions and exercise judgment when dining at an establishment with an Amber Designation. Domino's has earned this designation." So how has Domino's met "gluten-free needs and avoid cross-contamination with gluten"? Also, I think any celiac who watches the video Domino's made for this release will find it a bit scary...the same ovens, pizza scoopers, topping areas, etc., as where they make their regular gluten pizzas. I would exclude Domino's as an advertiser on Celiac.com based on this release. Some might think that the NFCA has sold out here. I invite them to respond using the comment field below, and I invite you to respond. Also, there is a lively discussion going on in our forum on this topic. Here is the original press release: ANN ARBOR, Mich., May 7, 2012 – Domino's Pizza is responding to the needs of choice consumers, today launching a Gluten Free Crust available in all of its nearly 5,000 U.S. stores and becoming the first national pizza delivery chain to offer such a product. Domino’s Pizza (NYSE: DPZ) consulted with the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) to ensure its products and team member training meet the standards of the foundation’s GREAT Kitchens Amber Designation. NFCA’s GREAT Kitchens is an official credentialing program that has expanded to include restaurants offering gluten free products with varying kitchen practices, therefore suitable for those with gluten sensitivity under the Amber Designation. Domino’s new Gluten Free Crust provides a great-tasting option for consumers who previously could not enjoy pizza from the recognized world leader in pizza delivery because of sensitivity to gluten – a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. “Many of our customers have asked for a gluten free crust, and Domino’s is excited to offer a product to customers with mild gluten sensitivity – as well as partner with the NFCA, which has been instrumental to our learning more about how to take this step,” said J. Patrick Doyle, Domino’s Pizza president and CEO. “The prevalence of gluten sensitivity has become a real issue with significant impact on consumer choice, and we want to be a part of the solution. Now, the whole group can enjoy Domino’s with the addition of our new Gluten Free Crust.” While Domino’s new Gluten Free Crust is appropriate for those with mild gluten sensitivity, Domino’s and the NFCA do not recommend it for those with celiac disease. Domino’s and the NFCA found that while the crust is certified as gluten free, current store operations at Domino’s cannot guarantee that each handcrafted pizza will be completely free from gluten. “The NFCA is thrilled that Domino’s Pizza has developed a product that will improve the quality of life for many of the estimated 18 million Americans who are gluten sensitive,” said Alice Bast, NFCA founder and president. “Not only is Domino’s Gluten Free Crust a huge win for much of the gluten free community who can now get pizza delivered to their door, it’s also delicious. Customers aren’t going to believe they’re eating a pizza made on a gluten free crust when they try it. And the variety of fresh toppings that are available is a giant leap ahead.” In an effort to remain open and informative about Domino’s Gluten Free Crust, Domino’s has created a video on YouTube that allows customers to decide whether this product is suitable for their diet, found here: www.youtube.com/user/dominosvids. “Offering Domino’s Gluten Free Crust is a big step for us, and we wanted to make sure we were doing it right,” said Doyle. “Domino’s is doing that by partnering with experts at the NFCA and by empowering the gluten sensitive community with the information they need.” Domino’s new Gluten Free Crust is available in stores across the U.S. in a small, 10-inch size only, and prices vary by store. Domino’s pizza made with a Gluten Free Crust is prepared in a common kitchen with the risk of gluten exposure. The National Foundation for Celiac Awareness supports the availability of Domino’s Gluten Free Crust, but cannot recommend the pizza for customers with celiac disease. Customers with gluten sensitivities should exercise judgment in consuming this pizza. About Domino’s Pizza® Founded in 1960, Domino's Pizza is the recognized world leader in pizza delivery. Domino’s is listed on the NYSE under the symbol “DPZ.” As of the first quarter of 2012, through its global footprint primarily made up of locally-owned and operated franchises, Domino’s operated a network of 9,810 franchised and Company-owned stores in the United States and over 70 international markets. During the first quarter of 2012, Domino’s had global retail sales of nearly $1.7 billion, comprised of over $830 million domestically and nearly $855 million internationally. Domino's Pizza had global retail sales of over $6.9 billion in 2011, comprised of over $3.4 billion domestically and over $3.5 billion internationally. In May 2011, Pizza Today named Domino’s its “Chain of the Year” for the second straight year – making the company a three-time overall winner, and the first pizza delivery company to receive the honor in back-to-back years. In 2011, Domino’s was ranked #1 in Forbes Magazine’s “Top 20 Franchises for the Money” list.
  10. Celiac.com 11/03/2008 - Blood testing for radioimmunoassay (RIA) tissue transglutaminase auto-antibodies (tTG-Abs) has proven to be a sensitive test for celiac disease follow-up. Recent studies have shown that RIA can accurately detect tTG-Abs in human saliva. However, not much is known about reliability of this method for monitoring the progress of celiac disease over time in patients who are attempting to follow a gluten-free diet. A team of researchers recently set out to assess salivary RIA tTG-Abs in celiac children on gluten-free diet. The research team included doctors M. Bonamico, R. Nenna, R.P.L. Luparia, C. Perricone, M. Montuori, F. Lucantoni, A. Castronovo, S. Mura; A. Turchetti, P. Strappini, and C. Tiberti. The team evaluated blood and saliva samples taken from 109 children at the time of their diagnosis for celiac disease. The first group included 71 females, with an average age of 9.4 years. A second group included 58 people who were following a gluten-free diet. The second group was broken into two subgroups: group 2a with 36 patients assessed at 3-6 months; and group 2b with 34 patients at 9 months or more (group 2b). The research team also included two control groups matched for age and sex. Group 3 included 89 gastroenterological patients, while group 4 included 49 healthy subjects. The team used RIA to detect tTG-Abs in saliva and blood, and compared the results against two other established tests: serum tTG-Abs ELISA and IgA anti-endomysium antibodies (EMA). The team detected salivary RIA tTG-Abs in 94.5% of patients from group 1, 66.7% of celiac patients from group 2a, and 50.0% from 2b. They detected blood RIA tTG-Abs in 98.2% of patients from group 1, 72.2% of celiac patients from group 2a, and 50.0% from 2b. The longer patients were on a gluten-free diet, the more the tTG-Abs decreased. The research team also found a correlation between saliva and serum levels (r = 0.75, P = 0.0001). A celiac disease follow-up showed comparable salivary and serum RIA sensitivities, and higher levels for EMA and ELISA methods. The research team concluded that it is possible to measure salivary tTG-Abs with a high level of accuracy; both at initial diagnosis for celiac disease, and also while patients are following a gluten-free diet. This discovery means that doctors treating people with celiac disease might soon be able to use a simple saliva test to monitor the progress of their patients’ gluten-free diets. Such a development might take remove much of the guesswork for celiacs who are trying to follow a gluten-free diet, and would be particularly useful for patients who might be asymptomatic, or who are at risk for celiac-associated conditions. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2008; 28(3): 364-370.
  11. Celiac.com 06/26/2007 - The results of a study recently published in the online science journal Nature Genetics have revealed a previously unknown genetic risk factor for celiac disease. An international team of researchers set out to study the genetic causes of intestinal inflammatory disorders. When the study began, it was well known that individuals with celiac disease have specific tissue types that identify wheat proteins. Why healthy individuals with the same tissue type failed to develop celiac symptoms or celiac disease remained unknown, and was a key question the team set out to answer. The team was led David van Heel, Professor of Gastrointestinal Genetics at Queen Mary, University of London. The Human Genome Project and the Hap Map Project played key support roles in the study. The results show that a protective DNA sequence in a specific gene segment, generally found in healthy individuals are missing in people with celiac disease. The research team evaluated genome data of 778 individuals with celiac disease and 1,422 controls non-celiacs within the British, Irish and Dutch populations. Key DNA Sequence Missing in Celiacs Researchers discovered that, compared to people with celiac disease, healthy people more commonly have a DNA sequence in the interleukin-2 and interleukin-21 gene region that protects against celiac disease. Interleukin-2 and interleukin-21 are cytokine proteins that are secreted by white blood cells, and which control inflammation. In people with celiac disease, the protective DNA sequence most likely leads to lesser amounts of these cytokines being produced, which weakens the defense against intestinal inflammation. Breakthrough in Better Understanding Risk Factors for Development of Celiac Disease About 1 in 133 people develop the disease, but, so far, predicting those at risk to develop the disease has been haphazard at best. Present methods of genetic testing can only narrow down the search to about 30% of the general population. These results give doctors a means to discover what further genetic risk factors leave people vulnerable to developing celiac disease. Queen Mary, University of London Press Release - Public release date: 10-Jun-2007 health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.
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