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Found 7 results

  1. Celiac.com 12/20/2007 - The Specific Carbohydrate Diet is an excellent option in dietary intervention for celiac disease and was originally developed for that purpose over fifty years ago by Dr. Sydney Valentine Haas. Dr. Haas treated over 600 cases of celiac disease with his Specific Carbohydrate Diet, maintaining his patients on it for at lease twelve months, and found that the prognosis of celiac disease was excellent. "There is complete recovery with no relapses, no deaths, no crisis, no pulmonary involvement and no stunting of growth." Specific Carbohydrate Diet - A Dietary Intervention for Celiac Disease and AutismA fifty-year-old diet used by adults to combat Celiac Disease and other digestive and bowel problems is also having a remarkable effect on autistic children.The Specific Carbohydrate Diet restricts but does not eliminate or limit carbohydrate intake. It is neither a low carbohydrate diet nor low calorie diet. The Specific Carbohydrate Diet developed from the research and practice of celiac management by a pioneer in the field, Dr. Sydney Valentine Haas and his son, Dr. Merrill B. Haas. Haas discovered that feeding monosaccharides and restricting polysaccahrides is effective in manipulating the food supply of types of bacteria that damage the intestinal lining, flatten microvilli and interfere with nutrient absorption. The late Elaine Gottschall, pursued her study of the effect of food on the functioning of the digestive tract and its effects on behavior for nearly four decades. Gottschall had visited Dr. Haas as a last resort before agreeing to radical surgery for her five year old daughter. The child was cured on Specific Carbohydrate Diet and went on to resume a normal life and diet. Gottschall, sought additional answers and pursued the brain-gut connection after the death of the senior doctor Haas until her own demise at age eighty-four. The diet has enjoyed great success among adults who follow it to heal Celiac Disease, Crohn's Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, and Irritable Bowel Disease. Celiac disease is considered incurable, but this diet can be a very effective treatment for it, especially when it is started very early for children. Recent research shows that more than 50% of children with autism have GI symptoms, food allergies, and mal-digestion or malabsorption issues. The history, an overview of celiac disease and the diet protocols are among topics that appear in in Gottschall's book, "Breaking the Vicious Cycle." The Specific Carbohydrate Diet excludes a category of carbohydrates not easily digested. The Specific Carbohydrate Diet is about the type of carbohydrates that will heal and not hurt. It is not about the quantity of carbohydrates and should not be confused with "low carb diets" or even the Paleo or "Caveman" diets to which it is sometimes compared. Elaine Gottschall was emphatic in stressing that the Specific Carbohydrate Diet is a balanced and wholesome diet. Thinking of the Specific Carbohydrate Diet as a low carb diet is one of the most common mistakes made by those who are not sufficiently informed. Eliminating carbohydrates can lead to a condition called "ketosis," which is why it is essential to include adequate carbohydrates in the daily menu. Carbohydrates contribute energy, essential nutrients, and fiber. People who have validated concerns about yeast may moderate the use of fruit and honey until things improve but should not have to eliminate them. Rest assured! You may include plenty of carbohydrates on Specific Carbohydrate Diet. Former choices of starchy foods like rice and potato are replaced with filling items like squash, bananas, peas, apples (and applesauce), avocados, almond flour muffins and others. These are carbohydrates that are easier to digest and more nutritious. Their nutrients are absorbed directly into the bloodstream without taxing a compromised digestive system. That is why the word "Specific" was chosen to name Specific Carbohydrate Diet. There is a strong brain-gut connection and it appears decreasing bacterial overgrowth is restoring cognitive abilities in many of the children following the special version for Autism, Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and Attention Deficit Hyperacticity Disorder. The autistic community of parents and doctors have favored popular dietary approaches like the gluten-free casein-free diet until recently, but in light of anectdotal reports of 75% success using the Specific Carbohydrate Diet as a dietary intervention, more physicians are recommending it. Parents and teachers of autistic children report changes in attitude, increases in skills and responsiveness, in some cases after only a few weeks on the diet. Although long term properly controlled studies have not been conducted, these numerous first hand reports attest to the potential this diet holds for the autism community, in addition to celiacs which have been helped by it for decades. The diet is more restrictive in some ways than the gluten-free casein-free diet, as most foods must be homemade, but the diet is varied, balanced, nutritional and the food every appetizing. Gluten sensitivity and intolerance to salicylates are symptoms of a damaged digestive system which is overrun with intestinal pathogens. When the health of the gut is restored, these symptoms disappear. It is better to cure the underlying cause than to just try to treat the symptoms. Because Specific Carbohydrate Diet reaches to the root cause of these problems by restoring the health of the digestive system, the Specific Carbohydrate Diet is being viewed as the optimal choice for celiacs and children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. As one mother has said, "When you see them emerge, the true child, with a loving personality, like an iridescent butterfly breaking out of its cocoon, well, that's why we all persevere." For more information about this diet please visit: http://breakingtheviciouscycle.info/ and http://www.pecanbread.com Editor's Note: Celiac.com supports the idea that the Specific Carbohydrate Diet is gluten-free and can be very helpful for many people, depending on their situation. We disagree, however, with the assertion that Elaine Gottschall makes in her book Breaking the Vicious Cycle that people with celiac disease can be cured by the Specific Carbohydrate Diet after being on it for a certain time period.
  2. Gregory M. Glenn is in the USDA-ARS Bioproduct Chemistry and Engineering Research Unit. Celiac.com 09/29/2004 - Those lightweight, polystyrene containers that some restaurants give you for carrying home leftovers or take-out meals are known in the foodservice industry as clamshells. Their hinged-lid construction indeed resembles the architecture nature uses for clams, oysters, and other familiar bivalves. Every year, billions of these clamshells and other foodservice containers made from petroleum-based foams end up in already overstuffed landfills. Slow to decompose, they become yet another environmental burden. But the containers, along with other disposable foodservice items such as plates, bowls, and cups, can also be manufactured with biodegradable ingredients. ARS plant physiologist Gregory M. Glenn is working with EarthShell Corp., the California-based innovators of potato-starch-based foam products such as burger boxes, to create environmentally friendly disposables made with starch from wheat, the worlds most widely planted grain. His wheat-starch-based prototypes are sturdy, attractive, convenient to use, and just as leakproof as their polystyrene counterparts. Glenn is with the Bioproduct Chemistry and Engineering Research Unit at ARSs Western Regional Research Center in Albany, California. Why use wheat starch in packaging? Because it offers manufacturers of foodservice products another choice among starches when theyre buying raw materials. That purchasing flexibility can help keep their prices competitive with the polystyrene products. Another important cost savings: The machinery already used to make EarthShells potato-starch-based containers is suitable for the wheat-starch products as well. That sidesteps the need for costly retooling at manufacturing plants. The machines are presses or molds that work something like giant waffle irons, explains Glenn. First, a wheat-starch batter is poured onto the heated mold, which is then closed and locked. Moisture in the batter generates steam that, in turn, causes the batter to foam, expand, and fill the mold. The steam is vented and, when the baking is finished, the mold is opened, the product is removed, and the cycle starts again. This whole process takes less than a minute. A water-resistant coating, added later, helps the container keep its strength and shape when its filled with a hot, juicy cheeseburger or creamy pasta alfredo leftovers, for example. But once the container hits the backyard compost pile or municipal landfill, it biodegrades in only a few weeks. Perhaps having our ready-to-eat meal packed for us in a guilt-free throwaway container, such as a wheat-starch-based clamshell, will make eating those foods even more enjoyable.—By Marcia Wood, Agricultural Research Service Information Staff. This research is part of Quality and Utilization of Agricultural Products, an ARS National Program (#306) described on the World Wide Web at www.nps.ars.usda.gov. Gregory M. Glenn is in the USDA-ARS Bioproduct Chemistry and Engineering Research Unit, Western Regional Research Center, 800 Buchanan St., Albany, CA 94710; phone (510) 559-5677, fax (510) 559-5818. Wheat—A New Option for Carry-Out Containers was published in the September 2004 issue of Agricultural Research magazine. Additional comments by USDA Plant Physiologist Gregory Glenn on 9/20/2004: Due to a current market shortage of wheat starch, the containers will be made of corn starch. However, you bring up a very valid concern and at some point the containers may be made of wheat starch. We are very sensitive to the concerns that Celiac sufferers have regarding wheat-based products. I spoke with Dr. Bassi of MGP Ingredients. MGP is a major supplier of wheat starch. Dr. Bassi is very aware of the concerns about Celiac disease and serves on an international committee that addresses this concern. Dr. Bassi can be reached at MGP Ingredients at 800-255-0302. Let me summarize our conversation. Wheat allergens are comprised of protein or wheat gluten. The starch component itself is safe and would only be a risk if contaminated by gluten. Dr. Bassi explained that current food regulations specify that gluten levels below 200 ppm can be labeled gluten free and are deemed safe for consumption by the general public. Wheat starch produced by MGP has a protein level of 5 to 30 ppm which is well below the required 200 ppm level. Our wheat starch containers are only about 50% wheat starch and they have a film or coating on the container that provides moisture resistance. It would also act as a barrier between the food product and the wheat starch. Thus, a food product would not come into direct contact with the wheat starch. As I mentioned earlier, the containers are currently being made of corn starch. However, the containers would be safe, even for those with wheat allergens, if the containers were made of wheat starch.
  3. Although associated with important Jewish holidays like Rosh Hashanah (the Jewish New Year), challah is not only a culturally significant bread at these times of year, but also a delicious and impressive bread to serve at your table any time. No matter what your reason for making this delicious bread, celebrate that this quick, easy (yes, I said easy!) and very impressive recipe is at your gluten-free fingertips any time you feel like looking forward to a sweeter day. All of you who have seen me at gluten-free cooking classes or demonstrations making yeast breads already know the dirty little secret about gluten-free bread. Shhhh.... don't tell the gluten-eaters! Seriously! It is super quick and shockingly easy to make homemade gluten-free bread! Impress your friends and shock the neighbors with this recipe too: not only is gluten-free challah delicious and super fast, it's almost too beautiful to eat! Ingredients: 1/3 cup warm water 1 package rapid rise gluten-free yeast 1 tsp. granulated cane sugar 1 cup vanilla dairy or non-dairy (soy or coconut yogurt) at room temperature 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 5 large egg yolks at room temperature (slightly mixed) 1/3 cup canola oil 4 Tbs. honey, agave nectar or molasses 4 cups Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour* 3 Tbs. + 2 tsp. granulated cane sugar 1 ¼ tsp. kosher salt ½ tsp. baking soda 2 tsp. gluten-free baking powder 1 large egg, mixed Poppy seeds, sesame seeds, raisins, or other topping or mix-in (optional) Directions: Preheat your oven to 200 F, then turn it off; if you have a warming drawer, you may set that to low/moist setting instead. Prepare a baking sheet by lining it with parchment paper. Bread Machine Method: Pour all the liquid ingredients into a bread machine set to "Dough" setting. Next add the sugar and honey and then the remaining dry ingredients, save the yeast. Make a well in the top of the dry ingredients and pour the yeast into the center. Close the lid and start the dough cycle. (If you choose to add raisins to the batter, add them during this cycle, after all the other ingredients have been mixed together). Watch to see that the dry ingredients are fully integrated; if they are not completely mixing in, go around the inside of the pan with a rubber spatula to aid in the mixing process. When the mixing portion of the cycle ends, you may remove the dough (don't wait for the gluten “dough” cycle to finish, as it will let the dough sit for 1 or 2 hours after mixing – this is not what you want for this gluten-free dough!). Stand Mixer Method: In a small bowl, mix together the warm water, yeast and 1 teaspoon of sugar to proof the yeast; set aside. In the bowl of your stand mixer, add the remaining wet ingredients and mix until combined. Whisk together the dry ingredients in a separate bowl. After 5 minutes of proofing, stir in the yeast-water mixture into the wet ingredients (note: if your yeast isn't bubbling at this point, throw it out and start again with fresh yeast). Gradually stir in the dry ingredients until fully integrated, then mix 2 minutes more on medium speed. Using either method, once the dough is combined, divide it in half and divide each half into three equally-sized balls. Roll each ball out into a coil or long log on a clean, flat surface dusted lightly with Jules Gluten Free™ All Purpose Flour. Pinch together one end of each coil, wetting them slightly with water to help them join together at the top, then braid them, finishing by connecting them to the top of the other end in order to form a crown, or circular shape. You will then have one round challah loaf. Gently transfer it to the parchment-lined baking sheet. Repeat for the second set of three balls. In the alternative, you can simply divide the dough in half, roll out into a flattened coil, then twist upon itself and join at the ends to form a circular loaf; repeat with the other half of the dough ball. In a small bowl, mix the extra egg together and brush over each loaf well, coating the entire top surface. Sprinkle the seeds or any toppings at this point, then place the tray (covering the loaves with wax paper sprayed with cooking oil) in a warming drawer set to low heat, or into the preheated oven for approximately 20 - 30 minutes. (Don't expect the bread to rise much at this stage). Once risen slightly, place the uncovered tray in an oven preheated to 350 F (static) or 325 F (convection) for 20-25 minutes. Remove to cool on a wire rack and cut after slightly cooled.
  4. Preparation time: 15 minutes. Bake time for muffins: 20 - 24 minutes Bake time for bread: 1 hr - 1 hr 10 minutes Makes 2 dozen muffins or 1 loaf of banana bread Note: When using the same batter for banana bread, the top does get bread brown quite easily; however, it is extremely moist inside. Ingredients: ½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature or 1/2 cup of oil 2/3 cup of granulated sugar 2 large eggs* 1 ½ cup of Silkie flour mix (1/3 cup each of brown rice flour, white rice flour, tapioca flour, ¼ cup each of corn starch, 1/8 cup each of sorghum flour and potato starch) 1 ½ teaspoon of baking soda 1 ½ teaspoon of baking powder ½ teaspoon of kosher salt ½ cup of sour cream 1 teaspoon of gluten-free vanilla extract 1 cup of mashed rip bananas (3 medium size) ½ cup of chopped pecans or walnuts Cinnamon sugar (optional) Directions: Preheat oven to 375, for muffins, apply paper liner or spray oil to the muffins tin; for bread, use butter or oil spray to gease a 9 x 5 x 3 inch loaf pan; set aside. In an electric mixer, cream butter or oil, and sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs one at a time and beat to blend. In a medium bowl, whisk together silkie flour mix, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Add to the butter mixture and mix until the ingredients combined. Add bananas, sour cream, and vanilla; mix to combine. Stir in nuts. For Muffin, fill each muffins tin abut 2/3 full and sprinkle some cinnamon sugar on top of the batter. Bake the muffin until golden brown on top. It should take about 20 - 24 minutes depending on the oven. For bread, pour the batter and fill the prepared loaf pan. Bake the bread for 1 hrs to 1 hr 10 mins until the bread is cooked. Note: the bread does get brown easily, so cover the top with foil after 20 mins of baking. Let the muffins and bread rest for 10 minutes before transferring them to a rack to cool.
  5. Gastroenterology 2005;129:797-806,1111-1113. Celiac.com 10/28/2005 – According to Dutch researchers, it may be possible to produce varieties of wheat that are safe for people with celiac disease. Dr. Spaenij-Dekking of Leiden University Medical Center and colleagues examined public databases that contained data on the many different varieties of wheat gluten proteins which can be found in wheat. Their goal was to identify the wheat varieties that contained the lowest levels of T-cell- stimulatory epitopes. The researchers found that the level of toxicity of the different types of wheat varies greatly, and the more ancient and grass-like the variety the less T-cell- stimulatory epitopes it contained, and conversely, the more modern the variety the greater its level of toxicity for those with celiac disease. They concluded that the use of selective breeding and screening could create a variety of wheat that is safe for those with celiac disease, and one that could prevent disease in those who are at risk.
  6. Ingredients: Gnocchi Ingredients: 1 lb. Russet potatoes (2-3 medium-sized), unpeeled and washed 1 cup Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour* 1 tsp. sea salt 1 Tbs. Extra virgin olive oil 1 large egg, beaten *(My all purpose flour already contains all the ingredients you need for flour in this recipe, including xanthan gum. You can make my flour yourself by following the recipe in my cookbook, Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten-Free Eating, or found in various publications like the Washington Post, linked from my Web site. You can also buy the flour pre-made from my Web site.. If you use another flour, be sure it includes xanthan gum and is not a rice-based flour, or the results will be crumbly and gritty). Sauce Ingredients: 10 oz. fresh mushrooms, chopped 1 ¼ cup peas 2 cups cream or soy creamer 2 Tbs. Extra virgin olive oil 1 Tbs. chopped fresh thyme 1 Tbs. chopped fresh chives sea salt and fresh ground pepper, to taste Directions: To make the gnocchi, boil or microwave the washed potatoes (if microwaving, pierce potatoes with a fork in several places) until tender – approximately 20 minutes for boiling, 8 minutes for microwaving, depending on the power of your microwave. Set aside to cool until you can hold them to peel. Once cooled, place peeled potatoes in a large bowl and mash with a potato masher until there are no remaining lumps. Shake ¼ cup flour over top of the potatoes, along with the salt. Squish together with your hands until incorporated with the potatoes. Repeat by the ¼ cup full, incorporating until the full cup is added. Form the potato mixture into a mound and make a well in the center. Pour the oil and beaten egg into the well and knead together until fully incorporated into the potato/flour mixture. It should no longer be wet, but will hold together if you squeeze a handful together. If it is too wet, add more flour by the tablespoon; if it is too dry, add a touch of milk (dairy or non-dairy). Flour a clean surface or baking mat with Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour. Pat the potato mixture out to approximately ½ inch thickness and cut into strips approximately ½ inch wide. Cut each strip into ½ inch pieces. Take each piece and round the edges with the tines of a fork, to form tubular pieces like miniature barrels. Place each piece of formed gnocchi onto a parchment-lined baking sheet and when finished forming the pasta pieces, cover with a cloth and refrigerate until ready to boil. Bring a 6 quart pot of water to boil in preparation for the gnocchi. In a separate saucepan, heat the oil for the sauce over medium heat. Add the chopped mushrooms and sautée until lightly browned. Add the peas, cream and thyme. Raise the temperature to medium-high and cook while stirring until the cream reduces by half. Season the sauce with salt and pepper, then remove from the heat. Meanwhile, place the gnocchi individually into the boiling water, boiling only enough to cover the bottom of the pot. The gnocchi are done when the float to the surface. Remove with a slotted spoon and serve with the sauce. Garnish with chives. Serves 4.
  7. Perfect for any occasion ... or no occasion! Your will power is no match for these moist cakes!I've provided frosting recipes too, so get started celebrating! Ingredients: 3 cups Jules Gluten- Free All-Purpose Flour 1 Tbs. gluten-free baking powder ¼ cup powdered milk, dairy or non-dairy (I use DariFree Original) ¼ tsp. salt ½ cup butter or non-dairy alternative (I like Earth Balance® Buttery Sticks) 2 cups granulated cane sugar 4 large eggs 2 tsp gluten-free vanilla extract 1 cup milk or non-dairy alternative (vanilla flavor) Directions: Pre-heat oven to 350° F (static) or 325° F (convection). Spray 24 cupcake tins with non-stick cooking spray or line with paper liners.Whisk together the flour, baking powder, powdered milk and salt and set aside. In a large mixing bowl, combine the butter and sugar and beat well with your mixer's paddle attachment, until the mixture is very light and fluffy (approximately 3-4 minutes). Add the eggs next, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Mix in the vanilla with the last egg addition. Slowly add the milk, alternating with the flour mixture and beating in between the additions. Beat until smooth and pour into the prepared pans. Bake for 20 minutes, turning the pans half-way through if using convection setting. Test the cupcakes for doneness by inserting a cake tester or toothpick in the middle of a cupcake and be sure it comes out clean. The cupcakes will also begin to pull away slightly from the sides of the pans. If necessary, add bake time in 5 minute increments until fully baked. When done, turn off the oven and leave the oven door open to let the cupcakes cool slowly there for 10 minutes or so, then remove to a cooling rack. After 15-20 minutes of total cooling time, remove from cupcake pans to finish cooling. Frost only when fully cooled, or wrap the cooled cupcakes with wax paper or plastic wrap and seal inside freezer bags to freeze until ready to use. Gluten-Free White Frosting Ingredients: ½ cup butter or non-dairy alternative, softened (I like Earth Balance® Buttery Sticks) 2 ½ cups confectioner's sugar 1 ½ teaspoon gluten-free vanilla extract ¼ cup dairy or non-dairy milk of choice (up to ¼ cup) Food coloring, optional Directions: Cream the sugar and butter together with an electric mixer. Add the vanilla and 2 tablespoons of milk, beating well to combine, then add the food coloring if using, and milk (if and as necessary) to achieve a spreadable consistency, beating for several minutes at the end until light and fluffy. Gluten-Free Chocolate FrostingUse white frosting base and add ½ cup cocoa powder. Use additional milk until proper consistency is achieved.
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