Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'pasta'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Celiac Disease: Diagnosis, Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Gluten-Free and Celiac Disease Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease - Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Celiac Disease - Post Diagnosis, Recovery/Treatment(s)
    • Celiac Disease - Related Disorders & Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Intolerance and Behavior
  • Celiac Disease Support & Help
    • Celiac Disease - Coping With
    • Celiac Disease - Parents of Kids or Babies With Celiac Disease
    • Gab/Chat Room - To Discuss Anything BUT Celiac Disease / Gluten-Free Diet
    • Celiac Disease - Doctors
    • Celiac Disease - Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Celiac Disease - Pregnancy
    • Celiac Disease - Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Celiac Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease - Sleep
    • Celiac Disease - Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes - Baking & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Gluten-Free Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Celiac Disease - Publications & Publicity
    • Gluten-Free Travel
    • Gluten-Free Diet & Weight Issues
    • Gluten-Free International Room (Outside USA)
    • Gluten-Free Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Other Food Intolerance and Leaky Gut Issues
    • Super Sensitive Celiacs & Gluten Sensitive
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
    • Lists of Diseases and Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Addison's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Anemia and Celiac Disease
    • Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia and Celiac Disease
    • Arthritis and Celiac Disease
    • Asthma and Celiac Disease
    • Ataxia, Nerve Disease, Neuropathy, Brain Damage and Celiac Disease
    • Attention Deficit Disorder and Celiac Disease
    • Autism and Celiac Disease
    • Bacterial Overgrowth and Celiac Disease
    • Cancer, Lymphoma and Celiac Disease
    • Candida Albicans and Celiac Disease
    • Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis) & Celiac Disease
    • Casein / Cows Milk Intolerance and Celiac Disease
    • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Cognitive Impairment and Celiac Disease
    • Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Depression and Celiac Disease
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Condition Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Diabetes and Celiac Disease
    • Down Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Dyspepsia, Acid Reflux and Celiac Disease
    • Epilepsy and Celiac Disease
    • Eye Problems, Cataract and Celiac Disease
    • Fertility, Pregnancy, Miscarriage and Celiac Disease
    • Fibromyalgia and Celiac Disease
    • Flatulence (Gas) and Celiac Disease
    • Gall Bladder Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Celiac Disease
    • Geographic Tongue (Glossitis) and Celiac Disease
    • Growth Hormone Deficiency and Celiac Disease
    • Heart Failure and Celiac Disease
    • Infertility, Impotency and Celiac Disease
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Intestinal Permeability and Celiac Disease
    • Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Kidney Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Liver Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Lupus and Celiac Disease
    • Malnutrition, Body Mass Index and Celiac Disease
    • Migraine Headaches and Celiac Disease
    • Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease
    • Myasthenia Gravis Celiac Disease
    • Obesity, Overweight & Celiac Disease
    • Osteoporosis, Osteomalacia, Bone Density and Celiac Disease
    • Psoriasis and Celiac Disease
    • Refractory Celiac Disease & Collagenous Sprue
    • Sarcoidosis and Celiac Disease
    • Scleroderma and Celiac Disease
    • Schizophrenia / Mental Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sepsis and Celiac Disease
    • Sjogrens Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Skin Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sleep Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Celiac Disease
    • Thyroid & Pancreatic Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Tuberculosis and Celiac Disease
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2011 Issue
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
    • United States of America: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Organizations
    • Outside the USA: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Contacts
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com
    • History of Celiac.com Updates Through October 2007
    • Your E-mail in Support of Celiac.com 1996 to 2006

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 39 results

  1. A cousin who was diagnosed with Celiac was visiting her family in Greece. In her case she can get either VERY uncomfortable to pretty sick when she has gluten. She had not visited Greece since the diagnosis. Family uses locally grown semolinaorganic, non GMO grain for their pasta. A small bite then, more then a meal and she was shocked that she did not have a reaction to it. I don’t pretend that everyone could do this since gluten is involved, but this is someone I know, and I think there is more to all of this then we think. The more I hear about staying organic and non GMO (generally) the more I think I need to stay that way as much as possible, in everything I eat.
  2. Hi, I am a grandmother whose grandson was just diagnosed with Celiac Disease at almost 14 years of age. I homeschool him, so I am in charge of feeding him breakfast and lunch during the week. He loves my spaghetti and goulash and was wondering if there are brands of gluten free pasta that are better than others. I am willing to make him spaghetti squash (which is healthier) but would like to have the option when all my grandkids are here for him to eat like they are, but with gluten free noodles. I bought Bob's Red Mill all purpose flour and made him pancakes today with my recipe except the flour difference and he was pretty thrilled with that. He was relieved that his favorite syrup was gluten free and that didn't have to change. This was my first day feeding him after his endoscopy and diagnosis. Last night was the first day for him to be gluten free after his scope. We are all researching pinterest, your website (which is extremely helpful) and reading labels. This is all new to us. Any tips, recommendations for brands on breads, pasta, pizza crust etc? I am very willing to make, bake or cook and to help him learn the processes for himself as well. Thank you for any advice in advance.
  3. I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease back in October 2009. I seem to be OK as long as i stick to a strict gluten free regiment which can be challenging at times. It is difficult to know if a product is truly gluten free when its labeled as such. I only buy gluten free labeled products and i'm still having problems with my stomach, specifically pasta. In the past year i switched from Tinkyada brand pasta to Barilla. I had heard and read that the taste and consistency of the Barilla gluten free product was not much different from traditional pasta. Being Italian, we typically have pasta every Sunday so this was great for me. In the past few months my body has been rejecting the Barilla gluten free pasta and i'm not sure if its due to a cross contamination issue. I'm tired of feeling sick and being in pain and would like to get to the bottom of this ongoing problem. Has anyone else had any problem with the Barilla gluten free brand?
  4. Hi, maybe someone out there has a brilliant idea. I used to enjoy making fresh pasta at home. In the meantime, byebye gluten. I would like to dust off my pasta maker and get back on it with a gluten-free version. The question is.... how do I clean it? It is not possible to use water since it rusts. Maybe run pieces of gluten-free dough through it a million times until it picks up all the traces left? The machine is already pretty clean, looks like new. Any thoughts out there? Also.. a recipe for gluten-free pasta dough would be appreciated.
  5. Celiac.com 12/26/2017 - Because gluten is vital to the texture, structure and stretch of pasta, replicating pasta without gluten is especially difficult. It's even harder for fresh pastas, and harder still for filled pastas, like ravioli and tortellini. In the case of pasta, the trick is to get the pasta to stretch around the filling. In traditional fresh pastas, the stretch comes from gluten in the wheat flour. General Mills thinks it has found an answer in a cold extrusion process of pasta dough made with a special blend of flours and gums. The company's process allows the successful manufacture of a variety of free-from, fresh pastas including ravioli, tortellini and agnolotti; products that were previously hard to make without gluten. The company is looking to patent its new method for manufacturing gluten-free filled pastas, such as ravioli, without any breaking or tearing during production. For this patent, the company chose a blend of rice flour and cornstarch had been chosen for a bland flavor profile, and relies on 2-3% xanthan gum for structure and flexibility. The process works best by including at least 10% fresh egg by by mass. The process General Mills hopes to patent delivers an improved process for a commercially manufacturable gluten-free or reduced-gluten pasta. Other parts of the General Mills process include: cold extruding the mixture into sheets of around 1-1.2mm thickness at 34 C or less; adding the filling; and shaping the pasta around it prior to cooling and packing. Early trials showed 32 C was best for plain pasta and 25.7 C for filled pasta. In all cases, the extruder pressure had to be 75 Bar or more. General Mills said its invention would help address the increased demand for variety in fresh, gluten-free and reduced-gluten products. Source: foodnavigator-usa.com
  6. Celiac.com 10/06/2016 - If you've bought pasta in a box, or if you've even strolled your boxed pasta aisle at the supermarket, you've likely come across Barilla, and their famous blue box. Well, it turns out that the world's largest pasta-maker might have been ripping off customers by routinely under filling their boxes. In fact, Barilla is being sued for 'substantially' under-filling boxes and, as a result, cheating customers out of as much as a quarter of their noodles. Plaintiffs Alessandro Berni, Domenico Salvata, Mossimo Simioli, and Giuseppe Santochirico, have filed a class-action lawsuit alleging that Barilla deceptively packages certain pastas in order to deceive consumers. They claim extra-protein, whole-grain, and gluten-free pastas are placed in the standard-size boxes used for plain old penne or farfalle — only these specialty boxes are "substantially under-filled." According to the plaintiffs' math, a box of Protein Plus contains 9.4 percent less pasta, the whole-grain variety is under-filled by 17.4 percent, and the gluten-free shorts buyers a full 25 percent. At the heart of the dispute is a practice commonly known as "slack-fill," the practice of leaving empty space at the top of packaged goods. Now, many consumers complaint about the practice, but if the contents are measured by weight, and the weight on the label matches the weight of the contents in the box, then there's no problem with slack-filling the package. Often it's done to prevent breakage. However, the plaintiffs argue that Barilla manipulated consumer familiarity with the size and look of the box, familiarity built by decades of marketing, to mislead consumers into thinking they were receiving the same quantity of pasta, even though that quantity, sold in that same familiar blue box, was up to 25% less than usual. The plaintiffs admit that the boxes do include a vague reference to a "new reduced net weight," but it was placed so that most customers would never notice it. Customers were otherwise uninformed that any change has been made to the amount of pasts in the box. Previously, Barilla has found themselves in hot water for funding a health study that "found" people didn't get fat eating pasta, which might have proven true had the study relied on under-filled boxes of Barilla. Oh, and then there was that time Barilla publicly suggested that people who are gay should "eat pasta from another manufacturer." So, will Barilla be forced to change its ways? Stay tuned to learn how this and related cases resolve. Read more at: Grubstreet.com
  7. Kst318

    Italian pasta

    My wife and I are traveling to Italy in October and will be eating authentic food over there obviously. I'm extremely sensitive to gluten and extremely celiac. I have heard rumors that people that are celiac don't have the reaction to the wheat pasta in Italy due to the processing of the wheat is different than that of the states. I am curious how much truth to this there is and if anyone has had any experience with this issue or recommendations as to what to avoid. I've never been outside the states and am fearful that I won't be able to eat over there haha
  8. Jovial Foods offers organic gluten-free pasta, cookies and ancient grain flours. Finding healthy gluten-free foods shouldn't be a struggle. Jovial takes simple ingredients and turns them into healthy, wholesome foods you feel great eating and serving to your family. Jovial is introducing a completely new way to bake gluten free. Jovial Gluten Free Flours are made with real flour, and no added starches. Did you know that most gluten free flours contain up to 40% added starch, even though gluten free grains have as much starch as wheat? We challenged the notion that added starch is needed in gluten free flours and discovered that these unhealthy ingredients actually create the off-flavors and strange textures that are so common in gluten free bread. Our flour is made with an abundance of protein and fiber-rich ancient grains, for bread & pastries with true texture and flavor. Now offering Gluten Free Bread Flour & Whole Grain Bread Flour, Pastry Flour & Whole Grain Pastry Flour. Here's to a new and healthier future of delicious gluten free bread. Made with ancient grains Truer flavors and textures, your breads & pastries will stay fresh longer. 3g of protein and 1g of fiber per 30g serving of flour. Made in a facility completely free of all major allergens. Jovial also carries a complete gluten-free pasta, cookies, glass-packed tomatoes and extra virgin olive oil that are all certified gluten-free! As parents whose child struggled with gluten sensitivities, Carla and Rodolfo, the founders of Jovial Foods, only create products that they feel safe giving to their daughters, which is why so much thought is put into the making of these products starting from the seed. To encourage gluten-free cooking and baking, jovial also hosts Culinary Getaways in Italy, where Carla herself teaches a number of hands-on classes to the guests. It's a great opportunity to cook authentic Italian food- without the gluten, but with all the flavor! For more info visit our site
  9. Celiac.com 12/31/2015 - Detroit-based gluten-free pasta maker Banza has been on a roll lately. Recently, Banza won the $500,000 grand prize in the annual Accelerate Michigan contest that supports entrepreneurial startup firms in the state. This win comes after an appearance on the Shark Tank-like reality show "Restaurant Startup" pulling down a $75,000 investment, and an initial crowd-funding campaign that netted about $30,000. You can find the company's products on the shelves of well over 1,000 stores, including giant chains like Meijer, along with tony specialty stores like New York City's Eataly. Check out the company website at eatbanza.com.
  10. Ingredients: 1 package of gluten-free rotelli pasta 1 package grape tomatoes, halved 4 ounces feta cheese, crumbled ¼ pound of deli salami, cubed Chopped Fresh Basil ½ chopped red pepper 2 chopped green onions Dressing: 1/3 cup olive oil 3 tablespoons lemon juice 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 ½ teaspoons dried oregano ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon pepper Directions: Wisk together dressing ingredients, then pour over salad and pasta. You can add black olives and artichoke hearts if desired.
  11. Destiny Stone

    Pasta Sauce (Gluten-Free)

    Traditional pasta sauce is naturally gluten-free. Although finding a safe gluten-free pasta sauce is work, and finding a sugar-free, gluten-free pasta sauce is virtually impossible. That is why the following recipe is so great. Not only is this homemadepasta sauce recipe easy and quick, it is also healthy and gluten-free. Please remember to use all gluten-free spices and ingredients and to check with the manufacturer if you aren't sure. Pasta Sauce (Gluten-Free) Preparation: 5-10 minutes Cooking Time: 10-15 minutes Ingredients: ½ cup of water ¼ teaspoon black pepper 1 stalk of chopped celery 1 chopped onion ½ teaspoon basil 2 tablespoon chopped parsley ½ chopped green bell pepper 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 (6) ounce can tomato paste 1 (8) ounce can tomato sauce 1/2 teaspoon thyme 1 teaspoon oregano ½ teaspoon himalayan salt, or to taste dash cayenne red pepper Note: The canned tomato paste and sauce can be substituted for the equivalent amount of homemade paste or sauce. Also, as always if certain ingredients don't agree with you, leave them out or substitute them for things you like. I know many people like bell peppers so I kept them in the recipe, however I substitute bell peppers for sauteed mushrooms; and I am not big on onions, so I use half an onion to taste. Directions: Combine the garlic, onion, green pepper & celery in a large skillet. Add the 1 tablespoon olive oil and saute' until soft. Once the ingredients become soft, add any ingredients that are left. Stir well. After covering, simmer for up to 7 minutes. Stir again and simmer another 2-3 minutes. Serve with your favorite gluten-free pasta and have yourself a healthy, gluten-free pasta dish. Top with feta, basil, or toppings of your choice and enjoy!
  12. For lunch today, I had gluten-free spaghetti pasta topped with Dave's Gourmet Hearty Marinara Gluten-Free & Organic Pasta Sauce—and the sauce was definitely hearty! I immediately noticed the large chunks of fresh tasting tomatoes and garlic in the sauce which was balanced perfectly with organic basil and onions. I love that this sauce uses only organic ingredients and real extra virgin olive oil as some pasta sauces use less expensive versions like canola oil. As you can probably guess, Dave's also doesn't use any artificial ingredients, colors, or flavorings. Another plus is that this marinara sauce doesn't taste too salty which is my pet peeve with many pasta sauces (if I want salt I'll add it or use Parmesan, thank you). In fact, this sauce has just the right amount of saltiness which means that the taste of the tomatoes, garlic and basil really come through in every bite. Overall, Dave's Hearty Marinara sauce is an authentic, full bodied, and very rich-flavored marinara sauce that is not only healthy, but tastes great. I would recommend it to anyone—and not just those who are on a gluten-free diet. For more info visit: davesgourmet.com. Review written by Scott Adams.
  13. Celiac.com 04/03/2015 - Want to make one of the easiest, cheapest, tastiest dinners in the world? Try this brilliant pesto sauce. The high price of pine nuts sent me scrambling for a pesto recipe that wouldn’t break the bank. This recipe delivers an easy, rustic, yet delicious take on an Italian classic. Ingredients: ½ pound gluten-free pasta of choice (I use Schar) assorted fresh vegetables, sliced and steamed 1½ cups fresh basil leaves 6 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1 cup extra virgin olive oil sea salt and black pepper to taste ½ tablespoon butter, as desired 4 ounces grated Romano cheese, as desired Directions: Roughly chop basil, and put into a small bowl. Add garlic and stir in olive oil with a fork. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Allow pesto to sit at room temperature for 20 minutes or so. Basically, I let it sit until the pasta and any vegetables are cooked and ready. Clean, cut and steam vegetables, as desired. Cook gluten-free pasta as per instructions until al dente. When done, strain, but do not rinse. Stir in butter, as desired. Drizzle pesto over pasta and vegetables. Top with grated Romano cheese. Traditional pestos mix the cheese into the sauce, but I find that for this version, it works better to add the cheese afterward. Also, feel free to get creative with how you eat the pesto. You can drizzle it on some fresh chopped tomatoes and use top toasted gluten-free bread for a nice bruschetta.
  14. Hi there, Firstly, thank you for reading my plight. I have been struggling with this digestive issue for a while now, and I figured a good way to figure out what I may be going through would be to ask a bunch of other people who could potentially be suffering from the same or similar issues. I believed I had a problem with gluten. If I eat wheat bread, I get bloated. I feel sick. Sometimes I have problems with going to the bathroom (but I've largely remedied that just by taking fiber supplements). Here's the thing, though. I can eat white bread all day. But I can't eat white pasta. If it's a wheat or whole grain product, it will make me gassy and bloated. Any type of pasta does the same--but white bread is totally fine. I feel just fine after eating it. I've been taking probiotics and my fiber supplements. It's definitely helped, but it just seems to unpredictable. Does anyone else have this issue? White bread is fine, but no pastas or wheat/whole grain bread. Thanks so much in advance for any insight!
  15. Whoever thought of combining bacon and eggs with macaroni and cheese has earned a well-deserved place in my annals of culinary greatness. This Italian classic is a staple in my kitchen, and I try to make it at least once a month. It's quick, easy, tasty, and hugely satisfying. It's also easy to scale for larger or smaller groups. I typically use Schar pasta for this dish, but use what you like. Ingredients: ½ pound bacon, chopped 1 tablespoon chopped garlic Freshly ground black pepper 1 pound gluten-free fettucini or spaghetti, cooked al dente 4 large eggs, beaten 1 cup grated Peccorino Romano cheese ¼ cup butter, soft ¼ cup Italian parsley, chopped Salt Directions: Cook bacon in large saute pan on medium heat until crispy. Remove the bacon and drain on paper towels. Cook pasta al dente, according to package directions. When done, remove from heat, stir in a bit of butter to prevent sticking and cover. In medium bowl beat eggs lightly until creamy and season with salt. Pour off all except for 3 tablespoons of bacon fat from saute pan. Add the garlic to pan. Season with black pepper. Saute for 30 seconds. Add cooked pasta to pan with garlic. Add butter and toss until butter melts. Remove the pan from the heat and add the eggs and the bacon, and whisk quickly until the eggs thicken, but do not scramble. Add the cheese and re-season with salt and pepper. Spoon into serving bowls and garnish with parsley. Serves: 4
  16. I'm the mom of a newly diagnosed celiac 16 yr old daughter. She was diagnosed about a month ago, and since the "shock" has worn off, we are getting pretty good at the gluten-free diet. (We= me and her, I've gone gluten-free with her) We are doing pretty good finding gluten-free foods, but are struggling with pasta and burger/hot dog buns! Udi's are good, but seem more like a chibatti (?) roll. When we ate at Red Robin, I literally asked where they got the burger buns from (Cisco, by the way) Pasta-wise we have tried one brand (sorry can't remember the name) and it was not pleasant. Any recommendations? Oh, and tricks on how to make bread/buns "less dry"? Thanks!!
  17. Jefferson Adams

    Pasta Primavera (Gluten-Free)

    Spring is here, and the veggies are flowing. When that happens, it's time to put them to work. Pasta Primavera is another of my many, many favorite dishes. Give me my favorite Schar pasta and whatever fresh veggies might be on hand, grab a splash of wine and throw in a dash of simple preparation and, violá, a smashing meal. I like this particular recipe because it is easy to make, and practically guarantees smiling guests. Ingredients: 1 pound of gluten-free pasta (I like Schar) ¼ pound sugar snap peas, ¼ pound of broccoli florets 1 cup zucchini, cut lengthwise and sliced 2 carrots, sliced 1 red bell pepper, cut into bite-size strips 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling 4 cloves garlic, thinly sliced 8 to 10 cherry tomatoes ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes ½ cup roughly chopped Italian parsley ½ cup grated Parmesan or Romano cheese Kosher salt fresh ground pepper, to taste Directions: Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the pasta and cook until al dente. Add the peas, broccoli, carrots and bell pepper to the boiling water during the last 2 minutes of cooking. Reserve 1/2 cup cooking water, then drain the pasta and vegetables and return to the pot. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook until just golden, about 30 seconds. Add the tomatoes, red pepper flakes and 1 teaspoon salt; cook until the tomatoes begin to wilt, about 2 minutes. Stir in ¼ cup of the reserved cooking water. Add the tomato mixture to the vegetables. Season with salt and set aside. Add butter to the pan and heat to medium high. Add pasta and sauté for 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the vegetables, parsley, Parmesan and toss to combine. Serve pasta in bowls with additional grated cheese and pepper to taste.
  18. This is the perfect dish to bring to a potluck lunch or dinner...everyone loves potato and pasta salad, and this one has a nice twist! Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 lbs. large purple sweet potatoes 1 container GO Veggie! Vegan Plain Cream Cheese, room temperature 1 1/2 cups cooked gluten-free pasta 1/3 cup red onion, finely chopped 2 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice 2 Tbsp. finely chopped parsley 2 Tbsp. finely chopped fresh basil 1/4 tsp. sea salt 1/4 tsp. freshly ground pepper 3 scallions, finely chopped 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil 3 Tbsp. GO Veggie! Vegan Parmesan Cheese, plus more for serving Directions: 1. Place potatoes into a large saucepan filled with cold salted water; bring to a simmer. Cook potatoes for 15 minutes or until tender; drain. 2. In a large bowl, mash potatoes using a fork. Add remaining ingredients; mix well to combine. Serve.
  19. If you're looking to make a delicious, romantic pass dish that your loved one won't soon forget, look no further. This easy recipe marries shrimp, pasta, butter, garlic and a few other simple ingredients to create a rich, tasty scampi dish that will have diners calling out for more. Ingredients: 8 ounces gluten-free pasta (I use Schar spaghetti) 12 large shrimp - peeled, deveined, and tails removed 1 tablespoon butter, divided 1 tablespoon olive oil, divided ½ cup chopped red bell pepper 2 cloves garlic, sliced ¼ cup dry white wine (such as Chardonnay) ¼ cup fresh heavy cream 1 teaspoon lemon juice 2 tablespoons clam juice 1 ½ tablespoons chopped fresh parsley 1 teaspoon sea salt Directions: Fill a large pot with lightly salted water, cook pasta until al dente, or slightly tender to the bite. Reserve ⅓ cup of the pasta cooking water, and drain pasta well in a colander set in the sink. Melt ½ tablespoon of butter and 1 tablespoon of olive oil together in a large skillet over medium heat, and cook and stir the red pepper and garlic until the peppers have softened, about 5-7 minutes. Stir in the shrimp, and cook and stir until the shrimp are opaque and orange, about 5 minutes. Remove the shrimp to a bowl and set aside, leaving the peppers and garlic in the skillet. Stir the wine, lemon juice, and clam juice into the skillet, and bring to a boil over medium heat. Mix in 1 more tablespoon of butter and 1 tablespoon of olive oil, and return the shrimp to the skillet. Stir in reserved pasta cooking water, cream, parsley, and sea salt. Add the cooked linguine, and shrimp and toss together with sauce. Simmer the mixture over medium-low heat for 3-4 minutes to let the pasta absorb some of the sauce, and serve hot.
  20. WARNING. Archer Farms gluten free Fusili (target brand) says on the back of the bag: processed in a facility that uses wheat. I got pretty sick. My own fault for not reading more carefully. Please learn from my mistake -don't get sick too! Am in the process of writing to Archer Farms b/c I am PISSED. Can anyone recommend another italian gluten free pasta? Thanks.
  21. Celiac.com 06/20/2013 - A restaurant owned by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver has been fined over $12,000 after a customer with celiac disease was sickened by eating regular pasta, instead of gluten-free pasta she was supposed to receive. The fine resolves a complaint brought by 38-year-old Kristy Richardson, who dined in 2011 at Jamie's Italian in Porstmouth, U.K. Richardson suffers from celiac disease. According to reports in the Telegraph, Richardson asked three different staff members to make sure she received gluten-free pasta, but she somehow received regular pasta. As a result, she became "violently ill," with nausea and vomiting that lasted for days and which left her weak for months, according to news reports. This in itself might be bad enough for most people, but, at the time, Richardson was on a waiting list for a heart and lung transplant. According to reports in the Sun, her gluten-triggered illness was so severe that her doctors temporarily removed her from that list; potentially depriving her of a transplant opportunity. Richardson complained, authorities became involved, charges were filed, and the restaurant eventually pleaded guilty to "selling food not of the nature, substance or quality demanded by a purchaser," according to the Telegraph. The fine is in addition to the nearly $4,000 previously awarded to Richardson in a civil case over the matter. What do you think? Should restaurants be fined if their gluten-free food contains gluten. Does it matter whether it makes people sick?
  22. I tried Boston Pizza's GlutenWise pasta last night and it was awful. It was plain terrible corn pasta with a very tiny amount of awful tomato sauce and a ratty piece of dried chicken breast and the price was 20 bucks which was ridiculous. The pizza is not very good either The crust isn't bad but it is only 8 inches and they really cheap out on toppings and cheese, which they don't do for regular customers. I would not recommend Boston Pizza to any celiac.
  23. Hello folks, I am looking for gluten-free pasta that is available in bulk package and is reasonably priced (including shipping). From my signature, you will notice that I have a ton of restrictions in eating. I am rather new to gluten-free lifestyle (in addition to other food-free) and at the moment, its hard to give up regular comfort food like pasta. I checked many store in the neighborhood and the variety is not that great. Plus, majority of the gluten-free pasta are rice pastas. Due to my medications, I am borderline on blood sugar so my gastroenterologist wants me to avoid carbs. Googling gave me only Ancient Harvest selling 10lb Quinoa pasta but the shipping is outrageous. I wonder how folks do it. If there is any grocery chain that sells gluten-free pasta in bulk. If it matters, I am close to NYC. Thanks in advance. (P.S. - DS, age 4.5, has autism. The plan is get him gluten-free too. So such comfort food will come handy)
  24. This recipe is perfect for those who like trying new types of pastas. It has a Thai-style flair that you just can't find in your average Italian recipes. Gluten-Free and Vegan Ingredients: 1 lb. gluten-free pasta 1 tsp. extra-virgin olive oil 1 can Thai Kitchen Coconut Milk 1 tsp. curry powder 1 large orange bell pepper, diced 1 lb. red grapes 2 scallions, thinly slice 1 Tbsp. unsweetened coconut flakes 1 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes 1/4 tsp. sea salt 1/4 tsp. freshly ground pepper 1 tsp. fresh lemon zest, plus more for garnish Instructions: Cook pasta according to package directions. Drain; set aside. Meanwhile, combine olive oil, coconut milk and curry powder in a large pan over medium-low heat; cook for 10 minutes, stirring often. Add cooked pasta and cook for another 2 minutes. Remove from heat; transfer to a large serving bowl. Add remaining ingredients; gently toss to combine. Serve warm. Garnish with additional lemon zest.
  25. This excellent tasting pasta recipe is very easy to make and it will please even the most picky pasta fans! Gluten-Free and Dairy-Free Ingredients: 1 cup Heartland Gluten-Free Penne Pasta 1 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil 1 head Swiss chard, cut into 1/2 inch pieces 1/2 cup kalamata olives 1/4 cup fresh cilantro 2 scallions, thinly sliced 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 1 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. fresh lemon zest 1/4 tsp. smoked paprika 1/4 tsp. sea salt 1/4 tsp. freshly ground pepper Instructions: Cook penne according to package directions. Remove from heat; drain and set aside. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, cook Swiss chard in olive oil over medium heat until wilted, approximately 4 minutes. Remove from heat; transfer to a large serving bowl. Add cooked penne, olives, cilantro, scallions, vinegar, lemon juice, lemon zest, smoked paprika, sea salt and pepper; gently toss to combine. Serve warm.