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Found 15 results

  1. Hi I am wondering if anyone was tested being negative for blood and or gene tests and later tested positive for Celiac. I was tested quite a few times but was already on a gluten free or very limited gluten diet. I also did the gene test which was negative and my previous GI Dr swore I could never have Celiac, but today my new nutritionist just told me that is absolutely false that is it still possible to have it. Because I have other autoimmune, HLA-B27, gastroparesis, IBS, acne (and cystic acne), eczema, and a bunch of other issues until he knows for sure he is treating me as if I have it. Help would be appreciated. Thanks
  2. I'm not exactly sure what to do at this point if what I am reading is correct. I don't want to go into too much detail right off the bat but I can tell you more if needed. I had an allergy test done, they messed up the first time and did a small panel, but my Whey Allergin, IgG came back as 32.20. Ref range: 0-88.60 mcg/mL In the notes it says "values less than 2.00 mcg/mL represent absent or undetectable levels of allergen-specific IgG anitibody. Values 2.00 mcg/mL and above indicate progressive increases in the relative concentration of allergen-specific IgG." This is where my doctor sent back for a full 96 allergy test, but he was concerned about any cross-reactivity due to the Whey results so he requested a Celiac panel as well. Everything on the food allergies came back as negative, besides some environmental allergies that were already tested previously and noted before. Could you please tell me your thoughts on the results? I think they might be negative. But if so, what do I do now? Should I request some other testing? Let it go? I would love to get some relief though and find out what is wrong with me. I fell like I have many of the symptoms that have been attached with Celiac disease. Not that I'm saying I would like to be diagnosed with something but if I were diagnosed it would make my medical history make much more sense. If you would like more detail on symptoms I can outline them. For Gluten Allergen, IgG, Casein Allergen, IgG and Whey Allergen, IgG (The Whey was the one on the first set of tests though) it says "Request Credited -- ORDINC; Test ordered incorrectly" Here are the results for Celiac Disease Panel: IgA - Result - Sufficient Gliadin IgA Ab - Result - 10.3 -- Ref Range - 0.0-14.9 Tis.Transglut.Ab IgA - Result - <0.5 -- Ref Range - 0.0-14.9 the notes section is not helpful at all. And I guess they didn't do the IgG so should I be asking them to do that? The doctor has to send it to a different lab than the one they use due to insurance. Thank you all in advance!
  3. Hi Everyone, I am sure that this question has been asked multiple times but I am new to this forum as well as the Celiac world. I haven't been feeling like myself health-wise for a couple years now, with my stomach always being bloated, crampy, irritated, and just plain old not feeling well. I am a 20 year old nursing student so I had not had the time to focus on what the issue may be but I finally decided that I wanted to figure it out. I love pasta, but every time I ate it my stomach would expand to the size of a 5 month old pregnant woman and become rock solid I got tested for gluten sensitivity and the test came back as having high allergen gluten IgG levels. It says that the normal amount is less than 2.0 mcg/mL and my results read 6.4 mcg/mL. The doctor at my school said the only way to determine if this is Celiac is to get a biopsy and see a GI doctor. It's not easy for me to do that as I am a busy student, out of state. I was wondering if anyone knew if this was a good indication of Celiac or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. I know it is hard to determine from that one test but I'm looking for all the help I can get. Thank you! - Naomi Moore
  4. Hello everyone I am new to the site but suspect I have something going on due to all my symptoms and so purchased a biocard home testing kit. I read the result before 10 minutes and it was negative. Before I went to bed I had an urge to look again and sure enough there was a red line showing positive. This was however after the 10 minute limit. My question is has anyone done a similar thing and gone on to receive a positive result from the dr? Many thanks for any help and advice.
  5. Celiac.com 06/29/2012 - A group of researchers recently set out to study cases of positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies with negative endomysial antibodies to determine whether or not such cases amount to celiac disease. The team included Thomas Hornung; Pavel Gordins; Clare Parker; and Nicholas Thompson. They are variously affiliated with the departments of Gastroenterology, and Immunology at the Northern Deanery of Newcastle upon Tyne, and with the department of Gastroenterology at Freeman Hospital in Newcastle upon Tyne in the UK. The most sensitive and specific blood tests for diagnosing celiac disease are those that detect immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies against human tissue transglutaminase (tTGA) enzyme, and those that measure aspects of connective tissue covering individual smooth muscle fibers, endomysial antibodies (EMA). Because of the high sensitivity (up to 98%) and high specificity (around 96%) reported for the tTGA assay, detection of tTGA is currently the primary blood test used in screening for celiac disease. The tTGA test also has a high negative predictive value approaching 100%, which makes it an excellent test for excluding celiac disease in both high and low risk groups. In contrast, positive predictive value of the tTGA test is rather poor with values between 28.6% and 60.2% being reported in several studies. EMA, on the other hand, has extremely high specificity values close to 100% and positive predictive value values approaching 80%.[5 10] However, compared with tTGA, EMA has lower sensitivity, usually under 90%. This being the case, the present standard celiac disease screening strategy is to first use tTGA, and then confirm positive results using EMA. However, doing it this way, doctors often end up with a group of patients who show divergent test results. For their study, the researchers wanted to gauge the percentage of patients with positive tTGA and negative EMA, but who were confirmed with celiac disease upon biopsy, and to identify factors in these patients that may help to increase diagnostic accuracy in such patients. The research team identified 125 consecutive patients with positive tTGA and negative EMA, who subsequently underwent endoscopy with at least two biopsies from the second part of the duodenum. The team charted any tTGA result over 15 U/ml as positive. They excluded any patients with known celiac disease at the time of testing. They then reviewed patient notes to assess indications for celiac disease serological screening, including the presence of iron deficiency anaemia, and symptoms such as diarrhea or weight loss, and family history of celiac disease. They defined diarrhea as a bowel frequency of more than three times a day. They then assessed histological evidence of celiac disease based on subsequent duodenal biopsies, plus Marsh grading. In cases where patient histology was unclear, they relied on the clinical assessment of a consulting gastroenterologist. Unclear histology included minimal/mild increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes of not more than 30 per 100 enterocytes and without villous atrophy, plus mild villous blunting with no increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes. They then categorized patients as either celiac disease negative, or celiac disease positive. Patients with no histological evidence of celiac disease on duodenal biopsies or equivocal histology plus overall clinical impression of celiac disease absence were categorized as celiac disease negative. Patients with histological evidence of celiac disease on duodenal biopsies or equivocal histology plus overall clinical impression of celiac disease presence were categorized as celiac disease positive. To measure IgA anti-tTGA antibody the team used a commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay called Aeskulisa, manufactured by Aesku Diagnostics GmbH in Wendelsheim, Germany. To detect IgA anti-EMA with the standard immunofluorescent method, they used commercial slides of monkey oesophagus sections (Euroimmun, Euroimmun AG, Lübeck, Germany). They used conjugated sheep antihuman IgA as a secondary antibody, relying on a test manufactured by Instrumentation Laboratory UK Ltd., in Warrington, UK. Overall, the team categorized 113 patients (90.4%) as celiac disease negative. Of these, 102 patients had no histological features of celiac disease, while 11 patients had unclear histology plus an overall clinical impression of not having celiac disease. They categorized twelve patients (9.6%) as celiac disease positive. Of these, 10 patients had positive histology, and two patients had unclear histology plus an overall clinical impression of having celiac disease. Of those with positive histology, 17% were Marsh grade I, 8% were Marsh grade II, 33% were Marsh grade IIIa, 17% were Marsh grade IIIb and 25% were Marsh grade IIIc. Those with celiac disease were more likely to be older and to have a higher tTGA level. The groups showed no difference in any clinical parameter. Source: Frontline Gastroenterol. 2012;3(2):81-83.
  6. I got a test from boots because I pretty much have all the symptoms of a celiac and also my mother has celiac. I'm 17 male. I have added the image of my test ....... What do you think? It's kinda faint
  7. Hello all, Thank you for providing a space to chat and gain support. I am hoping to learn more before my endoscopy which is this coming Wednesday. I just received my bloodwork results. I do not have them in hand, but the gastro doctor called to inform me they were positive. He stated my celiac panel number was "163", he said he's seen higher and anything over 15 was a positive for him. Which number is this, the tTg? I would be relieved to finally get a firm diagnosis and start towards feeling better. I've always been health conscious and the diet does not worry me. I just want to feel better someday! I also deal with severe anxiety and am in CBT. My CBT therapist has been so helpful! So that anxiety has me jumping down rabbit holes that they will find something even worse. Thanks again and hello.
  8. IMPORTANT: I trust my doctor, I am willing to answer questions, but I want you all to know that where I am in the process of getting a diagnosis requires me to have an endoscopy- a positive blood test in my situation does NOT give me all of the information the doctors need. With that being said, here's my story... This past Friday was the end of my eight week gluten challenge, a blood test, and another day in the land of waiting around for a specific diagnosis. I am here to tell you that I am sick and tired of feeling sick and tired, but only one biopsy was taken at my endoscopy in the summer, so I get to repeat the process of another endoscopy on February 19th, 2015. However, there are a couple pieces of GOOD NEWS that I want to share with all of you. 1. I got my blood test results today and there is no question about it- I tested positive just like before. Why is this good news, might you ask? I was told that if the test wasn't positive "enough", I'd have to keep eating gluten until I returned to being positive so that I could have my endoscopy. Before, I had been five months gluten free, so the last eight weeks were awful physically, emotionally, mentally, and even socially. So I'm so happy to be headed towards an actual label of a diagnosis that I can DO something with to feel better. 2. I did NOT end up in the Emergency Room YAYYY . ( There were several panic attacks, many bouts of stomach pain/problems, and my depression/anxiety skyrocketed during the eight weeks, fatigue was over the top, and this will continue to be the way it is until after the endoscopy because I MUST eat gluten to get an accurate biopsy/sample, but I'm just SOOO happy to have made it this far! ) 3. I am my own advocate for my health. It was April of 2013 that things first went haywire, but I will not give in or give up until I feel better and get a diagnosis! Thank you for reading. Feel free to comment here or instant message me if you do not feel comfortable with posting to the public forum. I invite anyone and everyone to ask questions, partially because I enthusiastic about helping others in any way I can, but also because I need to pass the time until my endoscopy Good luck to everyone on their own individual journeys~ Val
  9. Celiac.com 11/22/2009 - Celiac disease has been associated with numerous other auto-immune disorders. Recently, there appeared the case of a 40-yr-old competitive strongman with celiac disease, who responded to a gluten-free diet, but developed profound and generalized motor weakness with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis, a disorder reported to occur in about 1 in 5000 people. A team of researchers set out to further explore this possible relationship between myasthenia gravis and celiac disease via serological study. The research team was made up of Hugh J Freeman, Helen R Gillett, Peter M Gillett, Joel Oger of the Department of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Neurology) at Canada's University of British Columbia. The researchers performed celiac disease screens on frozen stored serum samples from 23 acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis patients with no intestinal symptoms. They examined both endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies. One in 23 samples (or, about 4.3%) tested positive for both IgA-endomysial and IgA tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Subsequent endoscopic study showed duodenal mucosal scalloping, while biopsies confirmed the histopathological changes of celiac disease. From this, they concluded that celiac disease and myasthenia gravis may occur together more often than is currently understood. Muscle weakness in celiac disease may be a sign of possible occult myasthenia gravis, even in the absence of intestinal symptoms. Source: World J Gastroenterol 2009 October 14; 15(38): 4741-4744
  10. Hello, I have been reading numerous posts prior to posting, and I know I am not the only one to go through this but I guess I am looking for people who actually have done it. I live in Ontario and I am a 23 years old female (even though that does not change anything it sets in with the rest of the story). Here is my story : After puberty, I started having fainting spells constantly... We did numerous tests, and all of them came back negative, expect for an iron deficiency which was unexplained. At that time I was 14-15 years old. The years went on, other issues came up, at 17 I was diagnosed with unexplained infertility, my iron level was still very low. I had very long cycles (3 to 7 months), which often had to be triggered with medication. After a 4 months treatment on Clomid, I became pregnant at the age of 19. Knowing that my chances to have a child were very low I decided to keep my son (nothing to do with the story either but I just wanted to point it out for the rest of the story as well). I had a fairly easy pregnancy. But after having my son, I had an unexplained hemorrhage. Anyways, after having my son things started going down, I was going through a really rough time, started losing a lot of weight (I was only 125lbs before I had my son, 115lbs a month after I had him). Anyways after I had my son, I started noticing that I was dizzy very often, my vision was getting worse, I was always constipated (unless I drank beer). I started consulting different doctors (mainly walk in clinics because I did not have a family doctor for myself). One doctor told me that my dizziness was due to the fact that I stood up too fast probably (??????) Another doctor told me that it was probably just the way I held my head (????????) I kind of gave up at that point. After consulting another doctor for getting the flu back to back without a couple of months. The doctor finally decided to do some blood work, Celiac wasn't tested then, but my vitamin levels were. It came up that my iron was extremely low. I was put on 3 pills of iron a day for 3 months. 3 months later I finally had a family doctor. I got tested and my iron level was still low, but since the iron pills were making me sick (so I thought) I was told that my body could probably regulate itself since it was almost at normal levels. About 6 months later, I went back to the doctor's for unrelated problems (so I thought), my doctor told me that my issues were more than likely due to stress. We tested for my iron again and it was very low again, I was put on another 3 months treatment. I never ended up going back to get tested because I was tired of doctor's excuses. Then my boyfriend noticed that I was losing my hair, I had a bald spot the size of a tennis ball... I was FREAKING out. I assumed it was due to a lack of vitamins, so I started taking vitamin supplements on top of the iron pills that I had been taking for about 5 months now. By that time, the dizziness has gotten worse; I would faint after moving the bed, or taking 2 shovels full of snow, or even going up the stairs. My hair had gown an inch in 3 years, and I kept having unexplained bladder issues. My mind was always foggy, my vision had gotten worse, I had changed prescription twice within a year. My stomach was always feeling upside down, but I blame that on the iron pills or my cycles. I would go to the bathroom only twice a week, something even less (but I was used to that so i thought that was normal). The least I would go was every 2 days. I went to the doctor's after 2 months of being of vitamin supplement and my hair not growing back. She said it was Alopecia and that it was probably due to stress (AGAIN). But she said that it was time to test her iron levels... as she was saying that, it is like lighting struck her, and she told me that perhaps I should take the blood test for Celiac decease. The only downfall was that the test was $60. I get to the lab, and the test was in fact $125 for a full test. I needed to know.... I was supposed to have the results within 24 hours. A week later, I still had not received a call from my doctor's, I assumed it was good news. But I figured I would call to make sure that my iron level were okay and that I would be ok to come off of the iron pills. When I call the receptionist tells me "Oh you were next on my list", instantly I think "oh noooo, what is wrong?", she says " The doctor would like to see you, Your blood work is positive for Celiac, but she says it is not urgent so I will book you for our next available appointment in 2 weeks." I started researching Celiac a little more deeply and EVERYTHING just made so much sense. My grandmother had died of small intestine cancer, even though she always ate healthy. I decided to not wait for my doctor and try out the gluten free diet. Within a week my vision was clear as water (still with glasses on of course), my brain was not foggy and I cleaned my car for an hour and a half without fainting. I was excited, FINALLY, finally I knew what was going on, and finally I knew that I was not just crazy. After 2 weeks I started having normal stools, even though I still only went to the bathroom every other day, I did not have to go 5 times to the bathroom in order to get anything out. On the day of my appointment, the doctor told me that my iron level was still very low, my Vitamin D level was extremely low, along with my B12. She had not tested for any other vitamin levels but she assumed that my other vitamin levels were low also... Now it explained why I had had to slap myself in the face in order to stay awake when driving. 2 out of the 3 tests came up positive (TtG and EMA). However the doctor said that she wanted to make sure that it was not a false positive. She said she would sent me for an endoscopy, HOWEVER I would have to eat really bad (gluten) again until the appointment. I prayed that the appointment would be scheduled soon... I've dealt with issues all of my life, I had no issues going through another couple of weeks of that. Though I got the call yesterday and my appointment is at the end of august (in over 3 months). After the appointment I started eating gluten again. My vision started getting blurry after the second day, I started falling asleep at the wheel within 12 hours, my stomach cramps, acid reflux was back within 12 hours. I refuse to go through this for another 3 1/2 months.... But I feel like I would be a woos if I just gave up and did not go. Plus, let's admit it, Gluten free food is expensive, being a home owner, mother of 2 and having a boyfriend who eats very well, financially we just get by. The extra expense isn't easy to deal with. In order to get a tax refund for gluten free food, I need a note from my doctor... Has anyone done it? Waited 3 months+ after a positive blood test??? Please re assure me, I felt so sick last night that I started crying and told my boyfriend that I could NEVER do it.
  11. Celiac.com 07/26/2010 - There is very little information currently available regarding the effects of follow up strategies for those celiac patients that follow a gluten-free diet. Therefore, it was the aim of of researchers in Italy to determine the t-transglutaminase antibodies (t-TG) in celiac disease patients while they were enrolled in a community based follow-up program over a 5-year period. Most patients that are diagnosed with celiac disease are told they need to adhere to a gluten-free diet for the remainder of their lives, and then they are usually left to figure it out on their own. However, it is recommended that celiac patients have regularly scheduled follow-ups after diagnosis for early detection of celiac related complications, and to reinforce the importance of adhering strictly to a gluten-free diet. In the year 2000, a community based “celiac disease-Watch” follow-up program was designed by the Local Health Authority of the Brescia Province in Northern Italy. The hope for the celiac disease-Watch program was to increase awareness of celiac disease and to standardize diagnostic criteria for celiac disease among health care professionals. Beginning in January 2003, all celiac patients that reside in the Province of Brescia have been enrolled in an ongoing celiac disease-Watch follow-up program. To encourage celiac patients to enroll in the follow-up program, the Italian government gives patients a bonus to subsidize their gluten-free diets, and all patients are required to contact the Local Health Authority every year to renew their bonuses. Furthermore, the celiac disease-Watch program requires all patients to have their serum tested once a year for detection of t-TG antibodies. Testing for the antibodies begins 12-16 months after a celiac diagnosis. The testing is free of charge to the patients and they can choose any laboratory they like. Results from the t-TG testing is reported to the Local Health Authority, and it is a requirement to continue to receive subsidization, although patients continue to receive subsidization regardless of their t-TG results. Those that test positive for t-TG antibodies during their annual follow up, are referred back to the clinic where they were initially diagnosed. At the clinic they receive a clinical evaluation, and dietary counseling. While those that have a clean bill of health are scheduled for follow up appointments every 3 years. Through this study, researchers found that as a result of the celiac disease-watch program, celiac patients with negative t-TG antibodies advanced from 83% to 93%. Respectively, using mathematical modelling to t-TG conversion rates observed in the study, the projected population of t-TG negative patients increased in population from 90% to 95% over the 5 year period. From this study, researchers were able to determine with confidence that without a follow-up strategy in place, patients with celiac disease will be inconsistent with adhering to a gluten-free diet. It is therefore strongly emphasized that regular serological and clinical follow-ups are a sustainable strategy to promote dedicated compliance to a gluten-free diet. Source: Digestive and Liver Disease doi:10.1016/j.dld.2010.05.009
  12. Celiac.com 06/04/2010 - A team of researchers recently set out to assess the positive predictive value of blood test screening for possible cases of celiac disease. The team included Peter Toftedal, Christian Nielsen, Jonas Trolle Madsen, Kjell Titlestad, Steffen Husby, and Søren Thue Lillevang. They are affiliated with the Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, and the Department of Clinical Immunology of Odense University Hospital in Denmark. P. Toftedal and Ch. Nielsen made contributions to the final published article. In deciding which possible celiac disease cases might require duodenal biopsy, doctors rely mainly on tests for celiac disease antibodies, such as immunoglobulin A (IgA) anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG), IgA endomysium antibody (EMA), IgA and IgG anti-gliadin antibodies (IgA and IgG AGA). For their study, the research team wanted to assess the diagnostic quality of blood testing for possible cases of celiac disease. They did this by performing celiac disease blood tests (IgA and IgG AGA, anti-tTG and EMA) on 11,915 subjects. They then combined the serological data with clinical data and duodenal biopsy results using a unique Danish personal identification number. They found that positive predictive value (PPV) fluctuated in accordance with various combinations of positive celiac disease antibodies. They found the highest predictive value (97.6%) when results for IgA and IgG AGA, anti-tTG and EMA antibodies were all positive. The team used a logistic regression model at initial blood screening to predict the probability of later biopsy-proven celiac disease in relation to concentrations of IgA AGA and anti-tTG. They found that anti-tTG concentrations correlated strongly with EMA positivity, number of additional positive antibodies, and higher PPV. The anti-tTG concentration upon first blood screening for celiac disease was highly informative in relation to EMA positivity, number of additional celiac disease specific antibodies and PPV. Lastly, results for the high-risk patient group showed that anti-tTG and IgA AGA concentrations at initial serological screening accurately predicted probability of future biopsy-proven celiac disease. Source: Clin Chem Lab Med 2010;48:685–91. DOI: 10.1515/CCLM.2010.136
  13. Vijay Kumar, M.D., Research Associate Professor at the University of Buffalo and President and Director of IMMCO Diagnostics: The three serological tests that are used for diagnosing celiac disease are: Anti-endomysial antibody (EMA) Anti-reticulin antibody (ARA) Anti-gliadin antibody (AGA) Each of these three tests provide a certain degree of reliability for diagnosing celiac disease. Of these, endomysial antibody is the most specific test. The following table is taken from our studies (Lerner, Kumar, Iancu, Immunological diagnosis of childhood coeliac disease: comparison between antigliadin, antireticulin and antiendomysial antibodies). % of Sensitivity % of Specificity Predictive Value % Pos Predictive Value % Neg EMA 97% 98% 97% 98% ARA 65% 100% 100% 72% IgG AGA 88% 92% 88% 92% IgA AGA 52% 94% 87% 74% The following definitions related to sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values may help: Sensitivity is the probability of a positive test result in a patient with disease. Specificity is the probability of negative test result in a patient without disease. Positive predictive value is the probability of disease in a patient with positive test result. Negative predictive value is the probability of no disease in a patient with negative test result. Karoly Horvath, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Director, Peds GI & Nutrition Laboratory; University of Maryland at Baltimore: The summary below shows the results of the main serological tests based on several publications including 388 patients with celiac disease, and 771 healthy subjects. SENSITIVITY- the proportion of subjects with the disease who have a positive test. It indicates how good a test is at identifying the diseased: Percentage of - IgA AGA Percentage of - IgG AGA Percentage of - IgA EMA Average 78% 79% 97% Range 46-100% 57-94% 89-100% SPECIFICITY- the proportion of subjects without the disease who have a negative test. It indicates how good a test is at identifying the non-diseased: Percentage of - IgA AGA Percentage of - IgG AGA Percentage of - IgA EMA Average 92% 84% 98.5% Range 84-100% 52-98% 97-100% POSITIVE PREDICTIVE VALUE- the probability that a person with positive results actually has the disease: Percentage of - IgA AGA Percentage of - IgG AGA Percentage of - IgA EMA Average 72% 57% 92% Range 45-100% 42-76% 91-94% NEGATIVE PREDICTIVE VALUE- the probability that a person with negative results does not have the disease: Percentage of - IgA AGA Percentage of - IgG AGA Percentage of - IgA EMA Average 94% 94% 100% Range 89-100% 83-99% 100% References: McMillan SA, Haughton DJ, Biggart JD, Edgar JD, Porter KG, McNeill TA. Predictive value for coeliac disease of antibodies to gliadin, endomysium, and jejunum in patients attending for jejunal biopsy. Brit Med J 1991;303:1163-1165 Ferreira M, Lloyd Davies S, Butler M, Scott D, Clark M, Kumar P. Endomysial antibody: is it the best screening test for coeliac disease? Gut 1992;33:1633-1637. Khoshoo V, Bhan MK, Puri S, Jain R, Jayashree S, Bhatnagar S, Kumar R, Stintzing G. Serum antigliadin antibody profile in childhood protracted diarrhea due to coeliac disease and other causes in a developing country. Scand J Gastroenterol 1989;24:1212-1216. Chan KN, Phillips AD, Mirakian R, Walker-Smith JA. Endomysial antibody screening in children. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 1994;18:316-320. Bode S, Weile B, Krasilnikoff PA, Gdmand-Hyer E. The diagnostic value of the gliadin antibody testing celiac disease in children: a prospective study. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 1993;17:260-264. Calabuig M, Torregosa R, Polo P, Tom s C, Alvarez V, Garcia-Vila A, Brines J, Vilar P, Farr C, Varea V. Serological markers and celiac disease: a new diagnostic approach ? J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 1990;10:435-442.
  14. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2006;18:503-506. Celiac.com 08/14/2006 – A team of German researchers led by Dr. Martin W. Laass of the Childrens Hospital in Dresden have determined that antigliadin antibody (AGA) positivity disappears in over 50% of cases, and is therefore a poor marker for celiac disease. The researchers did follow up AGA testing on 69 adults and 47 children who participated in a much larger study conducted four years ago and found that only 26 of the adults and 21 of the children still had detectable levels of AGA in their blood samples, and none of them were positive for IgA-class anti-endomysial antibodies. Additionally no correlation was found in the subjects between their serum and fecal AGA. The researchers conclude that the appearance of AGA should be interpreted as a non-specific “immunomodulation phenomenon” that has low specificity as a diagnostic marker for celiac disease. The researchers emphasize that it is still unknown why the AGA markers are transient, but various conditions might account for it, including a change in the sensitivity of the test that was used in the original study conducted four years ago versus the one used in this study.
  15. Celiac.com 03/14/2006 - Alba Therapeutics Corporation announced today successful completion of Phase Ib proof-of-concept studies for its lead compound, AT1001. In a 21-patient cohort of celiac disease sufferers, the oral administration of AT1001 versus placebo control induced a significantly positive result in the trials primary target endpoint. "We anticipated a strong signal, however, the magnitude of the response surpassed our expectations," stated Blake Paterson, M.D., President and CEO of Alba. "We are particularly excited, as to the best of our knowledge this is the first demonstration of a desired and systemic immunological effect resulting from a physiological event at a mucosal surface." AT1001 is an antagonist to the zonulin system -- a signaling pathway discovered by Alessio Fasano, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Medicine and Physiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and the basis of Albas extensive intellectual property portfolio. About Zonulin Zonulin is a signaling protein that transiently and reversibly opens the tight junctions ("tj") between the cells of epithelial and endothelial tissues such as the intestinal mucosa, blood brain barrier and pulmonary epithelia. Zonulin appears to be involved in many diseases in which leakage occurs via paracellular transport across epithelial and endothelial tight junctions (tj), and thus may play an important potential role in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. About Celiac Disease Celiac disease (celiac disease) is a T-cell mediated auto-immune disease that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals and is characterized by small intestinal inflammation, injury and intolerance to gluten. According to the National Institutes of Health, celiac disease affects approximately 3 million Americans, although the diagnosis is rarely made. The only current treatment for celiac disease is complete elimination of gluten from the diet, which results in remission for some patients. About Alba Alba Therapeutics Corporation is a privately held biopharmaceutical company based in Baltimore, Maryland. Alba is dedicated to commercializing disease-modifying therapeutics and drug delivery adjuvants based on the zonulin pathway. Albas lead molecule, AT-1001, is targeted towards the treatment of celiac disease and other auto-immune illnesses. Contact: Heather Bakalyar, 410-522-8708 x1106
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