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Found 22 results

  1. Hello! I had my second baby 7 months ago and have not fell well since, which has led me here. Last year, I got very sick several times (once right before I got pregnant and the other 2-3x were during my 3rd trimester...otherwise I had no morning sickness and an easy 1st trimester). I am in my early 30's and had not thrown-up since I was a little kid, so it was highly unusual for this to happen to me, especially given that my illness was in no-way related to pregnancy hormones, as I breezed through my first trimester. In each occurrence, my sickness involved awful vomiting and/or severe diarrhea and subsided after about a day. I did recall that twice I had eaten something with vital wheat gluten prior to falling ill (Field Roast Veggie Sausage, so yeah, lots of gluten). I had an impossible time gaining weight and baby was diagnosed with IUGR, or growth restriction, in my 2nd trimester after my anatomy scan showed him in the 6th percentile. Because I had gestational diabetes with my previous child, I was tested at 12 weeks and did not have it, but did develop it again in my 2nd trimester. I controlled it with diet and exercise and had no issues, so I do not believe the IUGR was anyway related to the GD diagnosis. Baby was born at 38 weeks at 4 lb. 7oz. My first child, not IUGR, was 6 lb 1 ounce at term, so it's possible that I do have smaller babies due to my genetics, but I have no explanation for the IUGR that I had for this last baby. No issue was ever found with my placenta, cord flow, etc. I am just now seeing that Celiac is often an IUGR cause, so I'm wondering why I wasn't tested for this to rule it out then. The main Celiac or gluten-sensitivity issues I have had are bloating, stomach pains, gas and loose/dark/sticky stools. I'm thin naturally and I am breastfeeding, but still I find myself down over 10 lb. from my pre-pregnancy weight, which was already low. Of course I am tired and struggle to focus, but I also have two children. I initially thought maybe that the almond milk I put in my morning coffee and oatmeal was the culprit as some are sensitive to the thickeners in it, but using dairy instead did not solve the problem. Since I ruled out almond milk, I came to the realization that the reason that I often feel most uncomfortable in the morning is because I have the most gluten then, usually toast or non-gluten-free oats. The rest of the day, save for snacks, I consume mostly veggies/fruits/nuts and thus limited gluten. I have switched to gluten-free oats in the morning and cut out all other gluten for the last 4 or 5 days. So far, my GI issues have improved but it's too early to say if it's a fluke or not. The last time I consumed gluten was two pieces of sprouted grain bread for breakfast and I had to go to the bathroom urgently afterwards and my stomach felt like it was burning/irritated all day. Should I get tested for Celiac? What tests do I order? Or does it sound like something else? No idea. I just would like to regain some weight and heal my body so I can be healthy for my family.
  2. My husband and I are wanting to grow our family soon . He has celiac. He was diagnosed very young and has been gluten-free ever since. We keep a gluten-free house for simplicity sake but since i don't have it i'm not completely gluten-free, just mostly. He carries both genes which to my understanding means our kids will have celiac (please! correct me if I'm wrong on that). My questions are: Do i need to be completely gluten-free during pregnancy? Do i need to be completely gluten-free while breastfeeding? I've read that celiac can cause difficulty getting pregnant and play into miscarriages but does that only apply if the mother is the one with celiac? Thanks in advance for any help! I've already been learning so much just reading around
  3. I've had coeliac disease for 5 years now. I'm 100% gluten free apart from the occasional accidental poisioning I sometimes get at restuarants. I've had two chemical pregnancies so far, 1 unplanned in 2014 and one planned this past month. My husband and I are trying to conceive. I can get pregnant anytime I try, but within 1-2 weeks they disappear. I'm seeing a specialist next week who reckons the auto-immune disease is forcing my body to kill of anything new that enters it... hence the recurrent failed pregnancies. I'm getting tests to confirm his suspicions, but he said there s treatment like a concoction of aspirin/heparin and IVGi's etc etc. I already take prescribed folic and prenatal vitamins etc. My question is... has anybody experienced this and have gone on to have successful pregnancies with or without the help of this medication? As I've only started trying for real, I'm very anxious that this journey is going to be one of heartache, so please share any success stories if you can! thank you in advanced Louise xx
  4. This article originally appeared in the Autumn 2002 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free newsletter. At the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Program, women with celiac disease who have recently become pregnant often contact us. Remarkably, the questions we receive from these women seldom stray from one issue, that is, whether or not to maintain a gluten-free diet while pregnant. Most women mistakenly believe that the gluten-free diet will deprive their developing fetus with the nutrients it needs, and hurt the growing baby. In fact, for a pregnant woman with celiac disease, remaining ON the gluten-free diet is the best and only option for the health of mother and child. The gluten-free diet provides pregnant women and their babies with all of the nutrients they need to grow and be healthy. Fortunately, for all concerned, there have been excellent research studies on fertility, pregnancy and celiac disease conducted by top-notch investigators around the world. While this important research has mainly focused on women, it is important to note that researchers have established (since the 1950s) that men also suffer from infertility due to undiagnosed celiac disease. Celiac Disease and Fertility In research studies to date, the incidence of celiac disease in women with unexplained infertility has been estimated at four to eight percent. While a number of studies have demonstrated that unexplained infertility can be successfully treated with the gluten-free diet, others have shown that there are factors other than malabsorption of nutrients that result in infertility, delayed menarche (the start of the menstrual cycle) and early menopause. In two large case control studies, researchers examined the incidence of delayed menarche, amenorrhea (cessation of the menstrual cycle for short periods of time), and early menopause. Both studies enrolled women with celiac disease who were following the gluten-free diet or eating a gluten-containing diet. They found that women who were not on the gluten-free diet started their menstrual cycle up to a year and a half later than women with celiac disease who were following the diet. In addition, researchers found that up to 39% of women not on the diet experienced periods of amenorrhea, compared to only nine percent of women who were on the gluten-free diet. As you would expect, women with celiac disease who were not on the gluten-free diet were found to enter menopause four to five years earlier than women with celiac disease who were on the diet. Researchers who have studied women with infertility have found that they test positive for celiac disease-related antibodies at a rate that is ten-fold higher than the normal population. They have also demonstrated that women with infertility who are diagnosed with celiac disease do not always exhibit iron, B-12, or folate deficiencies, which points to other celiac disease-related explanations for the development of their infertility. Celiac Disease and Pregnancy Researchers have also studied the effect of the gluten-free diet in pregnant women with celiac disease, in order to determine any impact on the developing fetus and the pregnancy outcome. In a study of 25 patients and 60 pregnancies researchers found that 21% of women who were not on the gluten-free diet experienced pregnancy loss, and 16% of women experienced fetal growth restriction. Researchers also remarked, however, that successful pregnancies occurred before and after diagnoses for many women in the study. In a large Danish study with 211 infants and 127 mothers with celiac disease, researchers found that the mean birth weight of children born to mothers on a gluten-containing diet was significantly lower than babies born to mothers without celiac disease. Interestingly, this same study determined that women on the gluten-free diet gave birth to children weighing more than those born to mothers without celiac disease! In a case-control study that looked at the effect of the gluten-free diet on pregnancy and lactation, investigators learned that women with celiac disease who were not on the gluten-free diet experienced pregnancy loss at a rate of 17.8%, compared to 2.4% of women with celiac disease who were on the gluten-free diet. These researchers found that there was no difference in the occurrence of pregnancy and fertility problems in women with sub-clinical (positive blood test, negative biopsy) or clinical disease (positive blood test, positive biopsy). Finally, in a group of women with celiac disease who had been pregnant more than once, researchers looked at the effect of the gluten-free diet on their future pregnancies. They concluded that the institution of the gluten-free diet upon diagnosis caused a relative 35.6% drop in pregnancy loss, 29.4% drop in low-birth weight babies and an increase of two and a half months of breastfeeding. While the malabsorption of nutrients is not the only cause of fertility and pregnancy-related problems for women with celiac disease, the gluten-free diet is essential to improving the health of women and their babies.
  5. I'm getting married soon (8 days) so we've been thinking about future and children and such. Is there anything I can do to prevent my child from getting celiac? I have it and I'm very sensitive. I was diagnosed at 9 after my dad was. Is there any way for me to keep my children from going through that?
  6. Celiac.com 05/02/2017 - Do women who use dietary supplements during pregnancy face higher rates of celiac disease in their offspring? To answer this question a team examined the maternal use of vitamin D, n-3 fatty acids (FA) and Fe supplements during pregnancy and looked for any corresponding risk for celiac disease autoimmunity, or celiac disease, in their children. The study, known as The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young, or "TEDDY," prospectively followed from birth children with increased genetic risk. The team defines celiac disease autoimmunity as the presence of persistently positive tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA). The TEDDY research team includes Jimin Yang, Roy N. Tamura, Carin A. Aronsson, Ulla M. Uusitalo, Åke Lernmark, Marian Rewers, William A. Hagopian, Jin-Xiong She, Jorma Toppari, Anette G. Ziegler, Beena Akolkar, Jeffrey P. Krischer, Jill M. Norris, Suvi M. Virtanen, and Daniel Agardh. For their study, the team enrolled 6,627 children with confirmed celiac disease. They confirmed celiac diagnosis either with biopsy results, and also included those with likely celiac, if they had persistently elevated levels of tTGA>100 AU. Of the 6,627 children originally enrolled, 1,136 developed celiac disease autoimmunity at a median 3·1 years of age (range 0·9–10) and 409 developed celiac disease at a median 3·9 years of age (range 1·2–11). The data showed that 66% of mothers used supplements containing vitamin D, 17% containing n-3 FA, and 94% containing iron, at 3–4 months postpartum. Over the entire pregnancy, mothers consumed an average total intake of 2,014 μg vitamin D (sd 2045 μg), 111 g n-3 FA (sd 303 g) and 8,806 mg Fe (sd 7,017 mg). After adjusting for country of residence, child's human leucocyte antigen genotype, sex, family history of celiac disease, any breast-feeding duration and household crowding, Cox's proportional hazard ratios showed no statistically significant association between the intake of vitamin D, n-3 FA or Fe, and risk for celiac disease autoimmunity or celiac disease. The use of dietary supplements during pregnancy may improve nutrition, but it is not likely to have any effect upon the risk for celiac disease in the offspring. Source: Cambridge.org The researchers in this study are variously associated with the Health Informatics Institute, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, The Diabetes and Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, 20502 Malmö, Sweden, Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Institute, Seattle, WA 98122, USA, the Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, the Department of Physiology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Finland, the Department of Pediatrics, Turku University Hospital, 20520 Turku, Finland, the Institute of Diabetes Research, Helmholtz Zentrum München and Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, and Forschergruppe Diabetes e.V., 80804 Neuherberg, Germany, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MA, the Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, the Unit of Nutrition, National Institute for Health and Welfare, 00300 Helsinki, Finland, the Health Sciences Center, Center for Child Health Research, University of Tampere, Tampere University Hospital, 33521 Tampere, Finland, and the The Science Center, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, 33521 Tampere, Finland.
  7. The last post related to this was from a few years ago, I hope it is ok that I started a new one. HELP! I am 8 weeks and am so incredibly nauseous on and off all day which I know is a totally normal thing. I would give anything to have ritz, vanilla wafers and saltine crackers. I have tried the gluten-free versions but nothing seems to be working. Any ideas or recommendations of specific things/brands to eat? I know I can speak to the nutritionist at the obgyn but was hoping for some assistance from all you gluten-free ladies. 1 month to go in my first trimester, I'm hoping my stomach will settle down after that. Thanks in advance! Also on a side note, I'm super grateful that I found out I have celiac before getting pregs, at least my iron is now on the upswing!
  8. Hi! I was hoping some of you might be able to tell me if my symptoms seem like good reason to be tested for celiac disease... I actually asked my doctor to test me (years ago) and she told me she would not test me because the test is expensive... However, I am now desperate to figure out how to manage my health issues and am willing to find a doctor that WILL test me if my symptoms seem to point to celiac...Here they are: I have been diagnosed with all of the following over the last 12 years (I am 22 years old, and have always been a healthy weight/slightly underweight, and quite active): Irritable Bowel Syndrome Fibromyalgia Anorexia (started when I was 10, I have been mostly recovered since I was 14) Depression Anxiety Panic Attacks Horrible mood swings (from suicidal to totally fine in a matter of minutes) Chronic constipation and bloating Acne HOWEVER, no one in my family has been diagnosed with celiac....am I wrong to think I have it??
  9. Hi there, Hoping to get some thoughts from others out there who are familiar with the range of symptoms and issues associated with celiac disease (or gluten intolerance). My story is sad and complicated, but basically starts with the fact that I'm 26 and have had 5 early miscarriages in the past year. Testing was inconclusive, until finally my RE found that I have an autoimmune thyroid condition (anti-thyroid antibodies/hashimotos). He started me on a low dose of synthroid to boost me up (even though my current TSH is considered "normal". Anyways, in reading more about autoimmune thyroid conditions, I found out that they are highly related to celiac disease and that they can also respond to a gluten-free diet. So I decided to go gluten-free because, well, at this point I'm willing to try anything to be able to have a healthy baby. After doing all this reading, I've done done more reflecting and an convinced I have done kind of gluten intolerance issue. I did blood testing a couple of days after first deciding to try gluten-free, and the clinic said that should still be Ok for identifying the antibodies/tissue transglutaminase). I'll find out in January. Anyway, my symptoms include: - recurrent pregnancy loss (infertility) - thyroid autoimmunity - skin rashes (Not DH), possibly eczema or chronic hives - dairy intolerance developed in the last few years (this has *completely* improved since going gluten-free 2 weeks ago) - stomach gurgling, gas and bloating (also stopped on going gluten-free) - chronically loose, smelly stool (sorry TMI! But, my BMs have been completely normal on going gluten-free!) - grandmother recently told me my uncle "was celiac as a child but grew out if it" (right. ) It seems fairly compelling to ne, especially given my digestive improvements. I'm even thinking that if the blood test comes back negative, I might just stay gluten-free to see how it goes (with pregnancy, thyroid condition, digestive health, etc). What do you think? Thoughts, insights, or advice greatly appreciated! Thanks
  10. Celiac.com 04/27/2015 - We know that women with infertility have higher rates of celiac disease than women who are not infertile. There's been some evidence to suggest that celiac disease might have impact women's reproductive health. However, the quest for more solid answers continues. A team of researchers recently set out to assess fertility and outcomes of pregnancy among women with celiac disease. The research team included Stephanie M. Moleski, Christina C. Lindenmeyer, J. Jon Veloski, Robin S. Miller, Cynthia L. Miller, David Kastenberg, and Anthony J. DiMarino. The team crafted a retrospective cohort study in which they analyzed information gathered from patients at a tertiary care celiac center, along with information gathered from members of two national celiac disease awareness organizations. A group of women without celiac disease served as control subjects. Both groups answered an anonymous online survey of 43 questions about menstrual history, fertility, and pregnancy outcomes. The group included 329 women with small bowel biopsy-confirmed celiac disease and 641 control subjects. Of the 970 women included in the study, 733 (75.6%) reported that they had been pregnant at some point. In terms of pregnancy, there was no significant difference between women with celiac disease (n=245/329, 74.5%) and controls (488/641, 76.1%; P=0.57). However, fewer women with celiac disease than controls (79.6% vs. 84.8%) reported giving birth following 1 or more pregnancies (P=0.03). Women with celiac disease had higher rates of spontaneous abortion than did control subjects (50.6% vs. 40.6%; P=0.01). Women with celiac disease also had higher rates of premature delivery, at 23.6% compared to 15.9% among controls (P=0.02). The average age at menarche was a bit higher in the celiac disease group, at 12.7 years, than in the control group, which came in at 12.4 years (P=0.01). This retrospective cohort analysis examining reproductive features of women with celiac disease, found that celiac disease was associated with significant increases in spontaneous abortion, premature delivery, and later age of menarche. Source: Ann Gastroenterol 2015; 28 (2): 236-240
  11. Celiac.com 12/03/2014 - It is important for pregnant women seeking medical consultation to get good, evidence-based information. This is especially true for pregnant women with celiac disease, who might wonder whether they face an increased risk of adverse birth outcomes and pregnancy complications as a result of their disease. So, does celiac disease increase a woman’s risk for pregnancy complications and adverse birth outcomes? Until now, there hasn’t been much good, solid data to give women a clear answer. With that in mind, a research team in England recently conducted a population-based study on pregnancy outcomes and adverse birth conditions in women with celiac disease. The research team included Alyshah Abdul Sultan PhD, Laila J Tata PhD, Kate M. Fleming PhD, Colin J. Crooks PhD, Jonas F. Ludvigsson PhD, Nafeesa N. Dhalwani PhD, Lu Ban PhD, and Joe West PhD. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, City Hospital Campus at the University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden; and with the Department of Paediatrics at Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden. The team used linked primary care data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink and secondary care Hospital Episode Statistics data to assess all singleton pregnancies between 1997 and 2012. They used logistic/multinomial regression to compare pregnancies of women with and without celiac disease for risks of pregnancy complications (antepartum and postpartum hemorrhage, pre-eclampsia, and mode of delivery), and for adverse birth outcomes (preterm birth, stillbirth, and low birth weight). They stratified risk levels based on whether women were diagnosed or undiagnosed before delivery. They found 363,930 pregnancies resulting in a live birth or stillbirth, 892 (0.25%) of which were among women with celiac disease. Women with diagnosed celiac disease showed no increased risk of pregnancy complications or adverse birth outcomes compared with women without celiac disease. However, pregnant women with diagnosed celiac disease did show a higher risk of postpartum hemorrhage and assisted delivery, with an adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of 1.34. Importantly, the team found no increased risk of any pregnancy complication among those with undiagnosed celiac disease. In all, they found just a 1% absolute excess risk of preterm birth and low birth weight among mothers with undiagnosed celiac disease, which corresponds to aOR=1.24 (95% confidence interval (CI)=0.82–1.87) and aOR=1.36 (95% CI=0.83–2.24), respectively. Overall, the results of this study offer some good news to pregnant women with celiac disease. Whether diagnosed or undiagnosed during pregnancy, celiac disease is not associated with a significantly higher risk of pregnancy complications and adverse birth outcomes. Source: Am J Gastroenterol. 2014;109:1653-1661.
  12. Celiac.com 08/27/2014 - Can antibiotic exposure in pregnancy increase the risk of celiac disease in children? Some researchers suspect that infant microbiota play a pathogenic role in celiac disease. The idea that antibiotic treatment in pregnancy could significantly impact the infant microbiota, and thus influence the development of celiac disease, has led many to ponder the possible connection. To get a clearer picture, a research team recently set out to study the effects on offspring of antibiotic exposure in pregnancy. The team included Karl Mårild, Johnny Ludvigsson, Yolanda Sanz, and Jonas F. Ludvigsson. They are variously affiliated with the Deptartment of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, the Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital at Karolinska University Hospital in Solna, Sweden, the Division of Paediatrics in the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine at Linköping University, Östergötland County Council in Linköping, Sweden, the Department of Paediatrics of Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden, and the Microbial Ecology and Nutrition Research Group at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology of the National Research Council (IATA-CSIC) in Valencia, Spain. The team started by reviewing existing data on antibiotic exposure in pregnancy in 8,729 children recorded in the All Babies in Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort study. Through December 2006, 46 of the 8,729 had developed celiac disease. The team then used Cox regression to estimate celiac disease hazard ratios (HRs) in children whose mothers received antibiotics during pregnancy. The ratios were adjusted based on parent-reported diary data on breastfeeding, age at gluten introduction, and the number of infections in the child's first year of life. Of the 1,836 children exposed to antibiotics during pregnancy, 12 (0.7%) children developed celiac disease as compared with 34/6893 (0.5%) unexposed children (HR = 1.33; 95% CI = 0.69–2.56). Risk estimates remained unchanged after adjustment for breastfeeding, age at gluten introduction and infection load in the child's first year of life (HR = 1.28; 95% CI = 0.66–2.48). When all the data were factored, the team found no statistically significant connection between antibiotic exposure during pregnancy and celiac disease in offspring. The team suggests that this data may present an accurate picture, or it may be that they simply lack the statistical power to make a clear connection. Further studies are likely needed before researchers can confidently conclude that there is no connection between antibiotic exposure in pregnancy and celiac disease in offspring. Source: BMC Gastroenterol. 2014;14(75)
  13. I had an endoscopy 12/2013 and was diagnosed as a Celiac. I guess I was a "classic case". I actually felt better on month 4 of gluten-free but have been having some issues again. So I am due for my follow up endoscopy. I feel like it's a test I am not ready for and could fail. What are they really looking for at this point? If I don't have a perfectly healed gut, what does that mean? No more babies? Also, I am trying to read through the site, but anyone up for telling me how long it took for the dry skin and leg bruising to stop? Maybe if you had hair loss, when did you get it back? (Biopsy diagnosed with T.E. 2010.) How about itchy skin? Did you heal your acid reflux? (Doc says I have two diseases, Acid Reflux and Celiac but how can Acid Reflux be a disease??? I thought it was a symptom.) Did you get pregnant? Healthy Babies? Thanks for your stories and any advice you have. (gluten-free, DF, SF, no oats since Jan 2014. No Gluten in body care except the occasional makeup. Not sure on cross contamination. Mixed household. Still learning.)
  14. I had my first prenatal with my OB (others have been with my reg. doc) and my doctor was a wee bit concerned with my weight gain. I've only gained 1 lb (in total and I was wearing my boots etc. so I don't know if I have even gained that). I explained how my thyroid has been regulated recently, I've cut out gluten and that I eat the same if not more than my husband on a daily basis (who was there for a visual) - he's 6'1 and about 220). I also said that my regular doctor said my pre-pregnancy weight was likely higher than it should've been naturally and that is why I haven't gained much as my body was sorting itself out. He said it's all well and good but that I should be gaining a pound a week going forward. I feel like other than having a food funnel that I can't physically eat more than I do currently! Has anyone else experienced this and have suggestions about what to add to my diet? Here's my norm foods: Quinoa, rice, rice pasta, avacado, nuts, yogurt, meat, eggs ,fruit, and veggies with a side of ice cream/cheese. I am sensitive to dairy so I can only have one serving or so a day.
  15. I've been a diagnosed Celiac for 4 years now. I'm gluten free and have been very healthy for those four years. I'm 13 weeks pregnant and my gynecologist told me yesterday that most Celiacs have recurring symptoms when pregnant. Has anyone else experienced this? Nausea, constipation, diarrhea. This is the same way I felt while eating gluten. My diet has changed a bit. I am eating more in general and trying to get more calcium and protein which means more eggs, yogurt, cottage cheese which I usually don't eat. Any suggestions. thanks!
  16. Hello. I am hoping to find (if nothing else!) some peace of mind here. I am a 33yo female with a history of hypothyroidism (x 10 years now.) Ever since my thyroid went bad, I've had some weird on and off chronic symptoms (mostly joint and muscle pain, indigestion and thinning hair) that have not been able to be explained, but also have only slightly improved since going on thyroid medication. Luckily, I have a great PCP and I am a nurse myself so I am confident Im on the right thyroid medication and its working for me. However over the past year, some other lovely symptoms have developed. The most irritating symptom is skin rashes- a mix between excema and possibly some dermatitis herpetaformis. Problem is, the dermatitis lesions are usually in my scalp, and of course NEVER around when I go see my doc or the derm, so I am self diagnosing. But although the break outs are infrequent, Im pretty sure they are DH and nothing else! The excema is constant, it never goes away now. The muscle pain, which had improved some a few years ago, is now back, and I have random swelling of my lymph nodes in my neck. The worst symptom which had recently developed was horrible diarrhea- ONLY at night (middle of the night, usually) with horrible stomach pain. The diarrhea was watery, sometimes oily, and only at night. After lots of trial and error (and googling!) I thought hey- Maybe this is a gluten issue. So I went to my doctor. My TTG/EMA were negative, however my IgA was low. Not horribly low- just about 10 points below normal. So my smart doctor reccomended a scope (colonoscopy or endo- not sure.) So I went to a GI guy. He was - well not great. I had randomly had a cat scan of my abdomen maybe 3 months before my visit, so he said, if my cat scan is negative, chances are nothing is wrong with my gut. Im probably just horribly constipated and thats why I get diarrhea at night!!?? He put me on massive amounts of fiber (um, hello, ask me about my diet- I eat tons of greens and fruit daily!) and then wanted me to do a big clean out (A FIVE DAY PREP) for a colonocopy. It never happened, because the meds he gave me for the prep had fake sweetners in them- I have been allergic to nutra sweet for as long as I can remember. (I told him that, too.) So, the scope was never done, and I've never gone back to that GI. I tried an elimination diet and was pretty sure it was the darn gluten. (sniff, tear, no more pasta for this italian girl.) I've been gluten free for about 4 months now. NO diarrhea at all. No belly pain at all. Joint pain is better. Havent had a DH lesion in awhile, though my excema is the same. So I am due to return to my primary doc this monday and I want to get tested again. However ,Im gluten free now, and the thought of eating gluten for WEEKS or MONTHS sounds so painful to me! I know- if you know your intolerant, why get tested? Just eat gluten free! Well, as a nurse I know that the immune response that comes with Celiac disease can be very dangerous. So, I would like to know how careful I need to be. I rarely go out to eat ,but when I do, I have not been asking about sauces/dressings. (I dont eat pasta or bread or breaded stuff, of course.) So - do I need to be that careful? Also, this May, I am getting married! We have talked about starting a family soon. For pregnancy- is it dangerous to not know your diagnosis? Can it make morning sickness/nausea/constipation while pregnant worse? Because Im concerned about all of that- I have family members with a history of hyperemsis- or not keeping anything down while pregnant. Would genetic testing be enough (so I can stay on my diet) and if so, how can I get that done? Of course, Im going to ask my doctor all these questions- but I thought I'd find some help (or peace of mind) in the experience others have had. I am new to this site, but it seems as though there is a wealth of information. Thanks everyone, and havea great weekend. RNRN
  17. Hi all, I am new to this forum and would like to ask for some advice from anyone that might have experienced the same. My husband is celiac and has been on a gluten free diet for the last 8 years. I am now 2 months pregnant on our first baby and have been worrying about whether I should be following a gluten-free diet during pregnancy and breast-feeding. I have heard that to minimise the chances of a baby developing celiac disease it is best to not introduce gluten into the baby's diet before 2 years old. So based on this i fear if me eating gluten during pregnancy might trigger the intolerancy into the baby. If anyone knows more on this please help... Thanks a lot! Zoi
  18. 10/05/2009 - Pregnant women with celiac disease suffer early pregnancy loss more often than women without celiac disease. A team of Italian researchers recently set out to look at a possible role of genetic pro-thrombotic variants in early pregnancy loss in women with celiac disease. The research team was made up of C. Ciacci, R. Tortora, O. Scudiero, R. Di Fiore, F. Salvatore, and G. Castaldo. The team looked at 39 women with celiac disease, who had experienced at least two early pregnancy losses within the first 3 months of pregnancy, a control group of 72 celiac women with a history of one or more normal pregnancies with no pregnancy loss. Each of the women were enrolled in the study immediately upon diagnosis for celiac disease, whereupon, the researchers obtained a clinical history obtained from each woman. The researchers then screened leukocyte DNA for factor V Leiden (mutation G1691A), factor V R2 (H1299R), factor II (G20210A), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) (C677T and A1298C), beta-fibrinogen (−455 G>A), PAI-1 alleles 4G/5G, factor XIII (V34L), and HPA-1 (L33P). Women with pregnancy losses were notably older (p = 0.002) among the celiacs than in controls. Of the gene variants examined, the allelic frequency of 4G variant of PAI-1, and the frequency of mutant genotypes were significantly more frequent in the group of celiac women with early pregnancy loss (p = 0.00003 and 0.028, respectively). Interestingly, the beta-fibrinogen −455 G>A genotype distribution differs substantially between the two groups, though frequency of the variant allele remains the same. The control group showed more frequent variant genotypes (p = 0.009). Based on these data, the research team believes the 4G variant of the PAI-I gene may predispose some celiac women who carry the gene to early pregnancy loss, though they note that their data should be confirmed on larger populations. Digestive and Liver DiseaseVolume 41, Issue 10, October 2009, Pages 717-720
  19. Hi! I'm very new to this world (two weeks new, to be precise) and was wondering if I might be able to get some advice. A couple weeks ago I found out that I was pregnant (I'm at seven weeks now), and a few days later I got a positive result on a TTG-IGA (I think that's what it was called... the requisition form says "anti-transglutaminase IgA") test that my doctor ordered for me. I am on synthroid after a partial thyroidectomy and my doctor ordered the celiac testing just as a routine thing due to the correlation between the two things. Surprise! My results came back at 110, which my doctor tells me is quite high. I didn't *think* that I had any symptoms, though in hindsight I realize that maybe bloating and gassiness after having a slice of bread isn't normal the way that I thought it was, and I wonder if I can ascribe the migraines I've long suffered and maybe even my thyroid troubles to this. Because I'm pregnant, I've chosen to go gluten-free immediately and not do the biopsy until I've delivered my baby because I don't want to do anything that involves sedatives, etc. that's not totally, totally necessary while I'm pregant. I know that I'm going to have to do a gluten challenge at the end of all this in order to get accurate results. I think it's probably just the hormones, but I'm feeling really, really anxious about all this and the baby and everything. Is there anything that I should be doing to make sure I'm helping my body get all the nutrients it needs to support the baby? Is the TTG test fairly reliable? Given that a positive result is anything over 10.0 U/mL, my doctor says I can pretty safely assume I've got celiac. I'm okay with this and actually a little excited about possibly resolving a whole whack of health problems with only ONE diagnosis, but it bothers me for some reason not to KNOW that I need to be gluten-free, even though obviously I'm not going to take any chances during pregnancy. Am I crazy? Is this result as high as my doctor is telling me?
  20. I am due to take my glucose test for my pregnancy. I am still new to learning what to look for other than wheat barley rye and flour. I had done some searching and read some people still got sick even when told that it is gluten-free so makes me nervous....being the bottle itself doesnt actually say Gluten Free. These are the ingredients listed on the bottle just looking for help to see if they are safe... Thank you in advance Active ingredient 5.0 g glucose per fl. oz(29.6ml) Contains: water, dextrose (d-glucose;source:corn), acacia, glycerol ester of wood rosin, FD&C red#40, citric acid, natural and artificial flavors, brominated soybean oil, sodium hexametaphosphate, BHA and .10% sodium benzoate as a preservative .
  21. Celiac.com 11/05/2012 - Over the last 40 years, studies have shown higher rates of menstrual abnormalities and pregnancy complications among women with celiac disease. However, the data from these studies have been inconsistent, and inconclusive regarding the actual effects of celiac disease on female fertility. To get a better picture of the relationship between celiac disease and female fertility and pregnancy, researchers recently conducted a more comprehensive study. The research team was led by Stephanie M. Moleski, MD, of Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals in Philadelphia. Dr. Moleski presented an abstract of the study data at the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting 2012. In the abstract, she points out that women with biopsy-proven celiac disease had significantly higher rates of fertility and pregnancy complications and gave birth to less children than those without the disease. Because it is an abstract, the study data and conclusions should be regarded as preliminary until they appear in a peer-reviewed journal, where they can be given a fuller context and be more widely scrutinized. For their study, Dr. Moleski and her colleagues recruited patients treated for celiac disease at Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, as well as members of the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness and the Gluten Intolerance Group, to respond in an anonymous Internet-based survey about fertility and pregnancy. Women without celiac disease also completed the survey and served as a control group. The survey included questions about celiac diagnosis and history, menstrual history, fertility, spontaneous abortions, and pregnancy outcomes. Approximately 1,000 women who completed the survey. Of those, 473 had physician-diagnosed celiac disease, while 298 women had the been confirmed for celiac via small-bowel biopsy. The researchers used the group with biopsy-proven disease to compare against 560 women without celiac disease. The data showed that 41.2% of women with celiac disease had increased difficulty conceiving compared with 36.5% of control subjects (P=0.03). Women with celiac disease also had more consultations with fertility specialists and higher rates of spontaneous abortion, preterm delivery, and cesarean section, compared with control subjects. Additionally, women with celiac disease were shown to have a shorter duration of fertility, to have a later onset of menarche and be younger when they experienced menopause, said Dr. Moleski. The data also revealed important differences between women with and without celiac disease. In all, 22.4% of women with celiac disease had consulted with fertility specialists, compared with 19% of those without (P=0.04). Also, 43.3% of celiacs had a history of spontaneous abortion, compared with 36.6% of non-celiacs (P=0.02). Compared with the control group of non-celiacs, women with celiac disease also had higher rates of cesarean delivery, 26.4% versus 23.8% of non-celiac women. Lastly, rates of preterm delivery were 23.2% for celiac women, and 14% for those without celiac disease (P=0.007), while the group with celiac disease was was also slightly older at the onset of their first period (12.7 versus 12.4 years, P=0.01). Among women reporting a history of spontaneous abortion, more than 80% of miscarriages occurred prior to diagnosis of celiac disease, said Dr. Moleski. She concluded that the retrospective analysis done by her team shows a clear relationship between celiac disease, fertility, and pregnancy outcomes, and suggests that the results demonstrate "a need for increased awareness of this association among patients and physicians." Sources: Medpagetoday.com American College of Gastroenterology, 2012; Moleski SM, et al "Infertility and pregnancy outcomes in celiac disease" ACG 2012; Abstract 15.
  22. Gut 2000;46:332-335 (Celiac.com 03/17/2000) In the latest issue of Gut, Italian researchers propose that celiac disease is more common than previously thought, and that pregnant women should be screened for celiac disease. They conclude that a screening could help women to avoid negative outcomes and miscarriages. Dr. L. Greco and his colleagues from the University of Naples Federico II screened blood samples from 845 pregnant women in an effort to determine the prevalence of celiac disease. They looked for elevated levels of endomysial antibodies against tissue transglutaminase to determine how many of them had celiac disease. Out of the 845, women 12 had celiac disease (1.4%), and only three of the 12 had been previously diagnosed and were not following a gluten-free diet. The other nine women underwent a small intestinal biopsy to confirm their diagnosis. Out of the 12 diagnosed women, seven had either a pre-term delivery, or their babies were smaller than normal. Out of the remaining five women, four had had at least one miscarriage. Three of the babies died. When following up with 11 of the women, eight had another pregnancy and seven of them had reached term at the time of publication. Out of the eight women, five followed a gluten-free diet, and six of their babies turned out healthy. According to the researchers: Coeliac disease is considerably more common than most of the diseases for which pregnant women are routinely screened. The authors conclude: Consideration should be given to screening for coeliac disease in pregnancy, because of the high incidence of avoidable outcomes and the chance of reversibility through consumption of a gluten-free diet.