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Found 7 results

  1. Celiac.com 09/01/2018 - Celiac disease is a common disease triggered by gliadin exposure in genetically sensitive individuals. It has long been known that untreated celiac disease is associated with intestinal malabsorption, but it is also associated with ongoing inflammation. This inflammation may have adverse effects on the uptake of important nutrients. This is probably the underlying reason for the increased risk of osteoporosis demonstrated in patients with celiac disease. Malabsorption and ongoing inflammation in untreated celiac disease could also potentially have a negative effect on fetal development. Several reports have indicated an adverse effect of untreated celiac disease on pregnancy outcome. We set out to use the national registers of Sweden to: Evaluate the association of untreated celiac disease and birth weight, pregnancy duration and intrauterine growth. Evaluate the same association in treated celiac disease. Compare the risk of the above two groups with a reference group of 2.8 million births to mothers who never had a diagnosis of celiac disease. A fourth objective was to evaluate placental weight to see if lower placental weight was more frequent in women with celiac disease. We found that untreated celiac disease (women diagnosed after pregnancy, but most likely having untreated celiac disease at time of pregnancy) was associated with a two-fold risk of low birth weight, pre-term birth, intrauterine growth retardation and cesarean section. The low birth weight and intrauterine growth retardation may have been mediated through malabsorption, since placental weight was lowest in women with untreated celiac disease. This study was published in Gastroenterology Aug 2005. A link to this paper can be found here: gastrojournal.org After that we set out to evaluate the association between adverse pregnancy outcome in males with untreated and treated celiac disease. In a previous paper, we had found an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcome when the father had celiac disease (Ludvigsson et al, Gut, 2001). Now, taking advantage of the large Swedish national registers (all births since 1973 and onwards are recorded), we found no increased risk of low birth weight, pre-term birth or cesarean section in infants to fathers with untreated or treated celiac disease. This study was published in the Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology in Feb 2006.
  2. Hi guys, feeling a bit lost. I've recently been told by GP that I've 99% coeliac. I was screened after ongoing anaemia and failure to get ferritin stores up despite months of supplementation and dietary changes. My bloods were at follows: Deaminated gliadin igg 330cu Tissue transglutamise iga 72cu The diagnosis has caught me off guard as I've never had any GI issues and don't tend to eat a high gluten diet. To complicate things further, I'm 7 months pregnant. My questions are: how abnormal are my bloods and are they very suggestive of coeliac as I read biopsy is only way to truly diagnose.... Is it unrealistic to think I can cut out gluten and get my iron stores up within the month, otherwise I'm looking at a transfusion. And if I cut out gluten would you recommend going back on gluten to get 100% diagnoses once I've had my baby? Or if I'm feeling better and iron comes up just continue as is.... Thanks ?
  3. Celiac.com 08/16/2016 - The short answer, yes! Although some women, due to certain complications are told not to exercise, for the most part exercise is totally fine while pregnant and actually quite a valid implementation to a healthy pregnancy. There used to be this myth that women had to be extremely careful with physical activity while pregnant due to the risk of possible miscarriage. Now we see pregnant women doing CrossFit, running, lifting weights, etc., as well as all sorts of beautiful yoga poses. This doesn't mean that if you haven’t worked out in 5 years and are pregnant you should suddenly start running 12 hours a day. No, not at all. On the other hand, if you have kept up a normal exercise routine it is totally fine to keep it up. Listen to your own body and understand things may feel different so don’t push yourself too much. I worked out plenty before getting pregnant and continued my many normal activities up until around 7 months. At that point I was very round and more tired than usual and going for regular walks, swimming and yoga was plenty enough "exercise" for me. I am celiac and I maintained my gluten-free diet during my pregnancy. I felt it was extremely important for me to be as healthy as I could so my body would feel good and therefore make my pregnancy that much easier. I have read that exercising throughout one's pregnancy can possibly shorten the labor too. Now this is a win-win in my eyes! The benefits of exercising while pregnant also include a lower risk of getting sick, lower risk of gestational diabetes, lower risk of depression and the list goes on. Plus, you can work on that lower core and strengthen your pelvis which will help a lot with back pains and hip issues that are all too familiar to pregnant women. Ask your OB-GYN or midwife for approval and once you get the green light go have some fun. You are more than likely to meet some other wonderful "future" moms, many of which are also looking to connect up and make friends. This is also a perfect opportunity to help other moms who may have some "odd symptoms", and if you are well-versed in the gluten-free diet and the symptoms of gluten sensitivity or intolerance, you can help another woman in need, hence her future baby. Moms uniting and sharing their tested knowledge is a lovely aspect of pregnancy these days. I hope this has inspired you and please feel free to contact me at any time with any questions. I focus on the gluten-free diet as well as the grain free diet, celiac disease, motherhood, and children issues. These are all subjects that I'm very passionate about.
  4. I'm 18 weeks pregnant (19 weeks tomorrow). I've been on a gluten-free diet for nearly 2 years, and last year I found out I was also sensitive to dairy, corn, and several grains (tapioca, teff, millet). I also have Hashimoto's but I'm on medication and my antibodies have gone way down since going off of the foods I'm sensitive to. I'm 5'1" and right now I weigh 103.5 lbs. I weighed 100 before I got pregnant and I gained 3 pounds in the first few weeks of pregnancy, but then had horrible morning sickness for about 3 months straight, causing me to drop down to about 95 lbs. Then I got hit with a stomach virus about a month ago which caused me to drop again down to 92 lbs. So I'm glad I've finally passed 100 again, but I am just not gaining much weight at all--maybe 1 pound every two weeks. The thing is, I have been eating like CRAZY. According to a calculator I used, I need to be eating at least 2500 calories a day to gain a pound a week. I'm eating over 3000, literally stuffing my face all day, and I hardly notice a difference. The baby is healthy and growing quickly, but I'm not! Any advice for me? If anyone's wondering, my typical diet consists mostly of meat, fish, seafood, eggs, quinoa, rice, lots of fruit and veggies, nuts (I have to be careful with nuts because they cause sinus congestion if I eat too many--I've already been tested for nut allergies and have none), seeds, smoothies, and occasional snacky foods like chips and chocolate. I've also been adding powdered gelatin to smoothies and soups for extra protein. My midwife told me I really needed to gain 5 pounds in the next 2 weeks. Help! I've seriously never eaten this much before in my life!
  5. Hello, I'm new and overwhelmed, and would appreciate any advice from you knowledgable folks! My background in brief - I've had a sensitive stomach with on-and-off issues since I was a teen. After my daughter was born two years ago I took up running and started having bad episodes of cramps, diarrhea, feeling faint etc which mostly happened after I ran for half an hour, but would last up to three days. I then became lactose intolerant. After I stopped running (for fear of mid-race accidents!) and cut out lactose I was better but not back to normal, with frequent upset stomachs, joint and bone aches, fatigue etc. I also became depressed and anxious. I'm now 34 weeks pregnant again, and things have got worse and worse this pregnancy. I never feel normal anymore. Everything hurts (much worse than first pregnancy) and my stomach is always unsettled. The only break I get from diarrhea is the occasional week long bout of constipation. I cut out gluten (plus other processed, sugary and greasy foods which always bother me) for two weeks and felt much better. I've since read that I need to be eating it for tests so started again a week ago - hey presto, cramps, fatigue and everything else is back. The doctors are unwilling to do any sort of checks until I'm done being pregnant (and possibly done breastfeeding) because they say it's normal for pregnancy to disrupt digestion and for hormones to cause low mood and anxiety. I'd accept this but I'm worried because I'm concerned that if I AM coeliac, the baby isn't getting the nutrients he needs from me. I'm planning on doing a home blood test in the hope that if it's positive, it will at least give me some leverage (I know I still need the doctor to confirm and I don't expect it to replace a diagnosis). But can I take it now, after my two weeks gluten free or do I have to wait? Is that enough to screw up the results? How hard should I fight for testing now? I know they won't do a biopsy during pregnancy because of the sedative, but surely if the blood tests were positive I'd need to go gluten free right away for the sake of the baby, so a biopsy would be useless. Any suggestions or thoughts? I've been so ill I can barely care for my toddler, I don't know how I'll cope with two children feeling like this. I'm also worried that I'm going to be in hospital barely able to make it to the bathroom (I'm having a planned section, nothing to do with this issue) with diarrhea and am terrified of the humiliation. Thank you so much if you managed to read my essay.
  6. Hi everyone, So i am 4 months pregnant and someone in my family seems to think i have a Gluten intolerance (I feel fine and dont think i have a problem) a few weeks ago i ate gluten infront of them and now they wont talk to me saying that im killing my baby. My question, Is there anyway that Gluten could harm my baby in any way even tho i am not intolerant? Is there any literature online that i can print off to prove that i will be fine and am not going to kill my child. This is getting very frustrating!
  7. Celiac.com 06/12/2013 - Pregnant women with higher levels of issue transglutaminase (anti-tTG), an antibody common in people with celiac disease, at risk for low fetal and birth weight in their babies, according to a new study in Gastroenterology. A number of studies before this one have confirmed an association between celiac disease and poor growth fetus growth, but very little study had been done as to how the level of celiac disease might affect fetal growth, birth weight or birth outcome. In an effort to better understand how the level of celiac disease affects fetal growth, birth weight, and birth outcome, a team of researchers set out to assess the associations between levels of antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG, a celiac disease marker) and fetal growth and birth outcomes for pregnant women. The research team included J.C. Kiefte-de Jong, V.W. Jaddoe, A.G. Uitterlinden, E. A. Steegers, S.P. Willemsen, A. Hofman, H.Hooijkaas, and H.A. Moll of the Generation R Study Group at Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. They conducted a population-based prospective birth cohort study of 7046 pregnant women. Serum samples were collected during the second trimester of pregnancy and analyzed for levels of anti-tTG. Based on these levels, they grouped each woman into groups of negative anti-tTG (≤0.79 U/mL; n = 6702), intermediate anti-tTG (0.8 to ≤6 U/mL; n = 308), or high anti-tTG individuals (over 6 U/mL; n = 36). They then collected data for fetal growth and birth outcomes from ultrasound measurements and medical records. The fetal growth data showed that, on average, fetuses of women in the positive anti-tTG group were 16 g lighter than those of women in the negative anti-tTG group (95% confidence interval [CI], -32 to -1 g) during the second trimester and weighed 74 g less (95% CI, -140 to -8 g) during the third trimester. The birth outcome data revealed that newborns of women in the intermediate and positive anti-tTG groups weighed 53 g (95% CI, -106 to -1 g) and 159 g (95% CI, -316 to -1 g) less at birth, respectively, than those of women in the negative anti-tTG group. Of mothers in the intermediate anti-tTG group, those with HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 had reduced birth weights that were double those of mothers without HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8. This study led the researchers to conclude that levels of anti-tTG in pregnant women are inversely associated with fetal growth. The higher the anti-tTG in women, the lower the birth weights of their babies. So, women with the highest levels of anti-tTG (over 6 U/mL) saw the greatest reduction in birth weight of their babies. Also, women with intermediate levels of anti-tTG (0.8 to ≤6 U/mL) saw lower birth weights that were even further reduced if they carried the HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 gene markers. Source: Gastroenterology. 2013 Apr;144(4):726-735.e2. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2013.01.003.
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