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Found 6 results

  1. Celiac.com 12/18/2018 - Prescriptions for gluten-free food will no longer be part of the UK’s vaunted national health care program in all places, due in part to the widespread availability of gluten-free foods at regular markets, and the high costs of maintaining the program. Starting Monday, December 3rd, 2018, gluten-free food will no longer be routinely available on prescription from any GP practice in the "Greater Nottingham" region for patients with celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis: a skin condition linked to celiac disease. Patients with such prescriptions, including children, will be notified by mail of the pending changes, and will receive information, help and support for managing their gluten-free diets. Coming at a time of "severe financial pressures", the decision ostensibly concerns patients in Nottingham, Rushcliffe, Gedling, Broxtowe and Hucknall, where patients were eligible for a mix of bread and flour each month. In the city, patients could get a range of products like bread, pasta, mix and cereal. Explaining the decision, Dr Hugh Porter, chair of the Nottingham City Clinical Commissioning Group, said "The cost to the NHS of a loaf of gluten-free bread is much higher than those bought in a supermarket.” Dr. Porter also adds that the Commissioning Group is planning a detailed evaluation process “to assess the effects of these changes over the coming year."
  2. Celiac.com 06/25/2018 - The latest studies show that celiac disease now affects 1.2% of the population. That’s millions, even tens of millions of people with celiac disease worldwide. The vast majority of these people remain undiagnosed. Many of these people have no clear symptoms. Moreover, even when they do have symptoms, very often those symptoms are atypical, vague, and hard to pin on celiac disease. Here are three ways that you can help your healthcare professionals spot celiac disease, and help to keep celiacs gluten-free: 1) Your regular doctor can help spot celiac disease, even if the symptoms are vague and atypical. Does your doctor know that anemia is one of the most common features of celiac disease? How about neuropathy, another common feature in celiac disease? Do they know that most people diagnosed with celiac disease these days have either no symptoms, or present atypical symptoms that can make diagnosis that much harder? Do they know that a simple blood test or two can provide strong evidence for celiac disease? People who are newly diagnosed with celiac disease are often deficient in calcium, fiber, folate, iron, magnesium, niacin, riboflavin, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and zinc. Deficiencies in copper and vitamin B6 are less common, but still possible. Also, celiac disease is a strong suspect in many patients with unexplained nutritional anemia. Being aware of these vague, confusing symptoms of celiac disease can help people get bette advice, and hopefully speed up a diagnosis. 2) Your dentist can help spot celiac disease Does your dentist realize that dental enamel defects could point to celiac disease? Studies show that dental enamel defects can be a strong indicator of adult celiac disease, even in the absence of physical symptoms. By pointing out dental enamel defects that indicate celiac disease, dentists can play an important role in diagnosing celiac disease. 3) Your pharmacist can help keep you gluten-free Does your pharmacist know which medicines and drugs are gluten-free, and which might contain traces of gluten? Pharmacists can be powerful advocates for patients with celiac disease. They can check ingredients on prescription medications, educate patients to help them make safer choices, and even speak with drug manufacturers on patients’ behalf. Pharmacists can also help with information on the ingredients used to manufacture various vitamins and supplements that might contain wheat. Understanding the many vague, confusing symptoms of celiac disease, and the ways in which various types of health professionals can help, is a powerful tool for helping to diagnose celiac disease, and for managing it in the future. If you are suffering from one or more of these symptoms, and suspect celiac disease, be sure to gather as much information as you can, and to check in with your health professionals as quickly as possible.
  3. Celiac.com 06/11/2018 - Untreated celiac disease causes damage to the small intestine, which can interfere with proper nutrient absorption. Most patients can recover proper nutritional absorption via vitamins and mineral therapy, according to the CDF. Avoiding gluten is key. However, many people with celiac disease may not know that their pharmacist might just be one of their best allies in the fight to avoid gluten. Currently, there are no rules that require drug manufacturers to disclose the source of medication ingredients. Consumers can contact the manufacturer directly with questions, and some drug companies strive for clear, helpful answers, but getting correct information can be challenging. Many times though, an answer won't address possible cross contamination during the manufacturing process. This is where pharmacists can be a strong ally for patients with celiac disease. Here are a few way that pharmacists can help people with celiac disease to avoid hidden gluten in their prescriptions and over-the-counter drugs. The first thing pharmacists can do is to check ingredients on prescription medications these patients are taking. They can also share related information to help educate patients, and to improve their choices, and speak with drug manufacturers on patients’ behalf. In addition to assisting with prescription medicines, pharmacists can offer recommendations on vitamins and supplements. As with prescription drugs, both doctors and patients should do their best to review the ingredients used to manufacture vitamins and supplements, and to share this information with celiac patients. So, if you have celiac disease, definitely consider enlisting your pharmacist in an effort to get complete drug and supplement information. This simple tactic can help you to remain gluten-free during your course of drug treatment, however long that may last? Do you have a story about gluten in prescription drugs or supplements? Do you use your pharmacist to help you better understand your gluten-free drug and supplement options? Share your story with us. Source: medscape.com
  4. So, where to begin... I was officially diagnosed with Celiac Disease about 2.5 years ago and have been trying to fully heal since then. I knew prior that I had celiac disease but didn't know how serious being gluten free needed to be if you have it. My intestines got so damaged that I had no energy (needed about 12 hours of sleep a day when I normally would sleep 8) and could barely function. I ended up having to quit my job because of how much time I had missed (had used all FMLA, vacation, etc) and spent about 5-6 months recovering till I had enough energy to work a 32 hour/week job but even then was calling out because of gluten exposure. The biggest problem for me has been Rx medication. Food has been hardly an issue at all, at least in comparison. I currently take 2 types of prescriptions and have had problems with both over the past 2.5 years; Hypothyroid medication (T3/T4) & SSRI for depression/energy. I used to go between Paxil and Cymbalta. I would be on one for about 9 months, switch to the other, and repeat (because of the immune system's "short term memory"). I've had a lot of trouble with generic brands and more recently have been using only name brands because they are the only ones now that are listed as Gluten Free on glutenfreedrugs.com, but, now I seem to be having problems with them as well. My doctor has told me that I'm very sensitive to gluten (I think she said I've ranged from an 8-12?). I'm not sure what scale she was referring to, but I know I'm very sensitive based on how my body's reacted to the smallest amount of gluten. When I ingest gluten, my body seems to react by my gallbladder producing a lot more bile (this is most noticeable about 8 hours after I consume gluten), which causes me to have severe diarrhea for about a week (it's basically all liquid). I take my Rx medications everyday, so it's non-stop diarrhea, which makes it hard to stay hydrated. The more water I drink, the more I just end up ****ing it out. I've been taking Benadryl at night because I heard it can help with upset stomach for people with celiac disease. Before I started taking the Benadryl at night I was waking up after about 6 hours of sleeping with extreme stomach pain (too much bile in my stomach?) and having to rush to the bathroom, and would be in there for about an hour. I'm very in tune to knowing when I'm getting gluten exposure for 2 reasons: 1) the slightest amount will cause my stool to get softer and I can smell a difference when I go to the bathroom (my guess is it's from the bile, which has a strong odor), and 2) the amount of long acting insulin required for me per day is less depending on how damaged my small intestines are (I have type 1 Diabetes). I started taking Cymbalta 60 mg about 2 weeks ago and notice severe gluten exposure. I was on it for about 5 days and stopped taking it for a day to see if the symptoms lessened and I couldn't see a difference from only a day. I tried to stop taking it for 2 days but the withdrawl symptoms were too severe (intense sadness/hopelessness, strong suicidal thoughts, etc) and I don't even remember if the gluten exposure symptoms lessened because I could barely function mentally. I'm pretty sure that's where the gluten is coming from because it was the biggest change at the time. I had actually switched from a generic Cymbalta (duloxetine by Mylan) slightly early from my 9 month usual switch because I was having gluten symptoms (at the time, glutenfreedrugs.com listed it on their list but soon changed it to "now questionable"). I'm currently trying Zoloft (been on it for about 3 days now) and the gluten symptoms seem to be slightly less but I won't know for at least another few days. Plus, I don't know if it's actually going to work for me (depression wise). I was going between Paxil & Cymbalta for about 15 years and they were working for me very well (as far as depression) up until recently (because of gluten). I know I've tried Celexa, Lexipro, & Wellbutrin in the past and cannot take them because they either make things worse or the negative side effects outweigh the benefits. I may have tried another type or two of SSRI but it's been so long that I can't remember for sure. I'm making this post to try and get some advice, or even just words of encouragement, on any generic Rx versions of Cymbalta (and Paxil as well, but I won't be taking it for a while so it's less relevant at this point) that people have recently had success with. I've searched online & this site but haven't been able to find anything recent about these medications (most of the posts I've found are from many years ago). I'm scared. Scared of all the times I want to kill myself in any given day because of not taking an SSRI to try and reduce the gluten exposure. Scared that things will get as bad as they've gotten before and I will have to quit my job again. Scared to cry because I'll become even more dehydrated and may not be able to keep fluid in me because of my body is currently not being able to absorb water the way I need it to. The past 3 years have been really tough and I don't really know where to turn at this point. Sorry if this post isn't the most organised. I'm currently an emotional wreck while typing this and at least trying to get out all the important info. Here is a list of new things I've been eating in case someone reads this and sees something they've had problems with that might (also?) be causing gluten issues: Schär Gluten Free Artisan Baker Multigrain Bread (to try and soak up some of the bile, but with constant gluten exposure this doesn't help much) Ensure Original Nutrition Shake (says Gluten Free on it) Pedialyte Advanced Care+ Benadryl
  5. Has anyone had a long run of not getting better after a completely gluten free diet and then realized it was because of the small amount of gluten in your prescription? I had been taking sertraline (anti-depressant and generic of zoloft) for about 6 months before being diagnosed with celiac disease. I continued to take my medication until someone brought to my attention that I needed to check my prescriptions for gluten too! Immediately I investigated and learned that my prescription did in deed have gluten in it. After days of trying to get pharmacists to cooperate with helping me find a gluten free version I ended up being told by a compound pharmacy that Greenstone was a gluten free sertraline so I changed prescriptions right away and got on the new medication. Still not feeling well I decided to call that new manufacture and found out that my pharmacist may have no been correct about her findings. They were told me that there was a "questionable" ingredient in their product. Has anyone else had a problem like mine? I am still feeling bad everyday and wonder if it is still the little amount of gluten I could possibly be getting in my medicine. I am going to the doctor tomorrow to talk to her about helping me get yet ANOTHER new prescription because I learned that Lupin carries a gluten free version. I really hope this is my problem of why I am not feeling better since I can fix it and not something else! I am so tired of feeling bad!
  6. Hi All, I am about to start a new prescription, so I just checked with the manufacturer. Online this is their statement: Contains Gluten:Product contains corn starch which contains a small amount of gluten, so it is not gluten free. However, it does not contain gliaden gluten, the type of gluten associated with celiac sprue. I called to talk to someone, which was of no further help. How can something contain gluten that won't affect me? I asked if they tested the product. She said no, but again that the corn starch contains gluten. If corn starch doesn't bother me (which it doesn't) then I should be able to take it. So are there trace amounts of gluten that are below the detectable amount (20ppm) or is there something else in this that really doesn't bother celiac patients??? I find their response absolutely confusing. If any of you can shed some light on this, it would be great! The drug I'm hoping to take is a generic version of a known gluten free drug, so I can easily go back to the pharmacy and exchange it. But, with a partner out of work, I'm hoping to save 25 beans Shellie
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