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Found 6 results

  1. Celiac.com 12/28/2018 - Beyond a few teaser studies, we don’t know enough about whether the individual micro-biome might play a role in the development of celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Top celiac researcher Alessio Fasano, together with colleague G. Serena, recently presented an overview of current knowledge regarding the contribution of the individual micro-biome to celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Their discussion includes a particular focus on how probiotics may be used as potential preventive therapy for CIDs. They are both affiliated with the Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center and Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children - Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. As part of their presentation, they write that, globally, cases of chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs) are undergoing a steep rise. This rise, together with limited effective strategies for slowing these disease explosions demands deeper knowledge of their physical mechanisms in order to reduce the adverse effects of the diseases on children. Several cross-sectional studies have shown a connection between intestinal microbial imbalance and active disease. Unfortunately, they note, these studies do not demonstrate any connection between changes in microflora as a factor in disease development, and so do not suggest any promising directions to explore for possible treatments. Fasano and Serena say that additional studies are needed to show conclusively whether intestinal dysbiosis plays a part in triggering CIDs. Furthermore, given the complexity of the microflora interaction with the host, it is necessary to design a systems-level model of interactions between the host and the development of disease by integrating micro-biome, metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, and metabolomics with either clinical or environmental data. In their overview, Fasano and Serena discuss the current knowledge regarding the contribution of the individual microbiome to celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Their discussion includes a particular focus on how probiotics may be used as potential preventive therapy for CIDs. The article includes a paywall, but you may find it at: Adv Exp Med Biol. 2018 Dec 20. doi: 10.1007/5584_2018_317
  2. Dr. Vikki Petersen D.C, C.C.N

    Keeping Your Infant Healthy Could Prevent Celiac Disease

    Celiac.com 05/25/2017 - No parent likes to see their child ill. This is most especially true of a newborn. The baby feels sick, perhaps has a fever, and often all they do is cry, look miserable and no one gets any sleep. So while we can all agree that it's no fun, could keeping your baby healthy actually prevent a lifetime of celiac disease? The answer is quite possibly 'yes' based on a recent study published in BioMed Central Pediatrics. The title of the study is: "Early infections are associated with increased risk for celiac disease: an incident case-referent study". [A case referent study is simply one where people with the disease to be studied are identified and compared to people in a control group who do not have that disease but are similar in other respects.] Specifically, the authors concentrated on the 'epidemic' of celiac disease present in Swedish children under two. Their goal was to discover any potential risk or protectant factors that could influence the expression of celiac disease. Nine hundred and forty five children participated in this study, 373 of whom had celiac disease, with the remainder making up the control group. All of those with the disease were diagnosed with it prior to their second birthday. The scientists discovered that if a child had 3 or more infections, regardless of type, during the first 6 months of life, their risk for contracting celiac disease was significantly increased. This risk remained stable after adjusting for variances in infants' feeding and socioeconomic status. Additionally, the risk of celiac disease was further increased if, in addition to the infections, the infants were introduced to gluten in large amounts, compared to small or medium amounts, after breastfeeding was discontinued. The authors concluded that there was actually a synergistic effect between early infections and daily gluten intake. That effect was more pronounced when the infants who were ingesting gluten, did so after breastfeeding was discontinued. So what is our take-away from this study? As a parent of a newborn, one certainly can control whether the infant is breastfed, and the benefits of doing so compared to any available formula seem irrefutable. Therefore, even if a mother is having some trouble nursing or with her milk production, it is well worth the effort to overcome whatever obstacles are present so her infant receives the benefits of nursing for at least 6 months. Personally I encourage a year, but 6 months would be the absolute minimum. Controlling whether or not your child becomes ill is certainly more difficult than ensuring he or she is breastfed, but I would like to share an interesting correlation that we see here at the clinic. Breastfed babies seem, on the whole, to be much healthier than formula fed babies. There is certainly considerable support in the research to support our clinical experience. You may have more control than you would imagine, simply by ensuring that your infant is nursed for as long as possible. The only further dietary recommendation I would suggest is that the infant's mother get checked for gluten intolerance during pregnancy or as soon as possible, and if she has any genetic markers for either celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, she should avoid all gluten (and dairy products) during the nursing months – both have been shown to lower the immune system. Finally, from a lifestyle viewpoint, it would perhaps be prudent to make the first 6 months or so of life as stress-free as possible. I know that some infants gain a passport and international travel experience well before their first birthday due to relatives in foreign lands or from out of state. While all families are excited to greet a new infant into the family, consider having the infant stay at home while others make the journey to meet him or her. This might very well prove to have long-term benefits for the child's health. I hope that you found this helpful. Unfortunately, celiac disease, much like so many other autoimmune diseases we are trying to avoid, continues to increase in frequency. Anything we can do to reduce the numbers of people suffering is well worth it. If you have any questions, comments, or would like to improve your health. Please contact me – call 408-733-0400. We are here to help! Reference: BioMed Central Pediatrics. 2012 Dec 19;12(1):194. Early infections are associated with increased risk for celiac disease: an incident case-referent study. Myléus A, et al.
  3. Celiac.com 11/20/2015 - A Canadian researcher has discovered what might be a big step toward preventing celiac disease. Dr. Elena Verdú, an associate professor at the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, has found that bacteria in the gut may contribute to the body's response to gluten. If her discovery pans out, it may be possible to treat, or even prevent, celiac disease by changing the the type of bacteria in the gut. "By changing the type of bacteria in the gut, we could change the inflammatory response to gluten," says Verdú. So far, researchers have been unable to explain why 30 per cent of people have genes that can cause celiac disease, but only 2 to 5 per cent actually develop it. Also a mystery is why the disease develops at any age. Higher rates of celiac disease are being driven not just be better testing and awareness, but also by external triggers. According to Dr. Decker Butzner, a Calgary-based pediatric gastroenterologist, there are another triggering factor which we've never understood…[t]here is an environmental trigger." Researchers have known for some time that people with celiac disease have different types of gut bacteria than those without celiac disease, but they didn't whether the changes in gut bacteria were caused by celiac disease, or the other way around. Verdú's study, which found that the inflammatory response to gluten was impacted by gut microbiota, is the first study to show that it is the gut microbes are likely triggering celiac disease. The study appears in the American Journal of Pathology. Read more at TheSpec.com.
  4. Celiac.com 06/24/2010 - I have previously suggested vitamin D deficiency and the makeup of gut bacteria during pregnancy and infancy, while breast-feeding and prior to and during the introduction of gluten, may be factors leading to the onset of celiac disease. The question of how much vitamin D should be given to infants remains open. The current recommendation, by the American Academy of Pediatrics, is that children of all ages should receive 400 IU of vitamin D each day. A recent limited study of 74 diabetic children, however, suggests that this recommended dose may still be insufficient for most children. The children were given daily vitamin D doses ranging from 400 IU to 2000 IU over a 12-month period and their vitamin D status was monitored. Most of the children remained vitamin D insufficient or deficient at the end of the study. The study concluded that all children younger than 5 years should probably receive at least 1000 IU of vitamin D daily. Further study is needed, especially with specific emphasis on the onset and prevention of celiac disease during infancy. Source: Medscape Medical News - June 22, 2010: More Evidence That Current Pediatric Vitamin D Recommendation is Often Inadequate http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/723993
  5. Celiac.com 08/04/2014 - Can excluding gluten, the protein complex present in many cereals, help to prevent diseases other than celiac disease? Seeking to gain insight into the effects of gluten-free diets on obesity, and its mechanisms of action, a research team set out to assess whether gluten exclusion can prevent the development and expansion of adipose tissue. Specifically, they wanted to determine if a gluten-free diet reduces adiposity, inflammation and insulin resistance associated with the induction of PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma expression. The researchers included F.L. Soares, R. de Oliveira Matoso, L.G. Teixeira, Z. Menezes, S.S. Pereira, A.C. Alves, N.V. Batista, A.M. de Faria, D.C. Cara, A.V. Ferreira, and J.I. Alvarez-Leite. The are affiliated with the Departamento de Alimentos, Faculdade de Farmácia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. For their study, they fed a high-fat diet containing 4.5% gluten to a control group of C57BL/6 mice, and a gluten-free diet to another group of C57BL/6 mice. The team measured body weight and adiposity gains, leukocyte rolling and adhesion, macrophage infiltration and cytokine production in adipose tissue. They also measured blood lipid profiles, glycaemia, insulin resistance and adipokines, and determined expression of the PPAR-α and γ, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), carnitine palmitoyl acyltransferase-1 (CPT-1), insulin receptor, GLUT-4 and adipokines in epidydimal fat. The gluten-free mice had less body weight gain and adiposity, with no changes in food intake or lipid excretion. These results are associated with up-regulation of PPAR-α, LPL, HSL and CPT-1, which are related to lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation. Gluten-free mice also showed improved glucose homeostasis and pro-inflammatory profile-related over-expression of PPAR-γ. Moreover, intravital microscopy showed a lower number of adhered cells in the adipose tissue microvasculature. The overexpression of PPAR-γ is related to the increase of adiponectin and GLUT-4. The study data support the beneficial effects of gluten-free diets in reducing adiposity gain, inflammation and insulin resistance. The data suggests that a gluten-free diet should be tested as a new dietary approach to preventing obesity and metabolic disorders. Source: J Nutr Biochem. 2013 Jun;24(6):1105-11. doi: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2012.08.009.
  6. Am J Clin Nutr 2002;75:914-921. Celiac.com 06/06/2002 - Results of a recent study conducted by Anneli Ivarsson and colleagues at Umea University in Sweden suggest that continuing to breast-feed infants while they are being introduced to new foods may reduce their risk of getting celiac disease. Dr. Ivarssons study suggests that the cause of celiac disease may include environmental factors, and not just be limited to genetic factors. Their study evaluated the breast-feeding habits of 627 children with celiac disease and 1,254 healthy children, and specifically looked at their responses to newly introduced foods. The results, published in the May issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, indicate that dietary patterns of infants may have a strong influence on the bodys immune responses, and certain dietary patterns could lead to lifelong food intolerances. Children under 2 years of age who were still being breast-fed when they were introduced to dietary gluten had a 40% lower incidence of celiac disease. Another important factor was the overall amount of gluten in an infants diet, and a direct correlation was found between increased gluten consumption and an increased incidence of celiac disease. According to the researchers, the protective effect of breast feeding was even more pronounced in infants who were breast-fed beyond the introduction of gluten. Ultimately the teams findings indicate that breast feeding infants through the period of gluten introduction can significantly lower their risk of getting celiac disease. More research needs to be done to determine if this protective effect will extend over a lifetime.
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