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Found 16 results

  1. This small study suggests that taking probiotics may contribute to brain fogginess and bloating. While it may be good to keep the large intestine (colon) populated with healthy bacteria, taking probiotics in patients with impaired gastrointestinal mobility (e.g. diabetes, celiac disease) may contribute to issues like SIBO where the bacteria may populate in the small intestine instead. https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-08-probiotic-link-brain-fogginess-severe.html Talk to your doctor about taking a probiotic. Consider modifying your diet to include foods that can help populate the large intestine (e.g. fermented foods), instead of taking a supplement.
  2. Celiac.com 07/12/2018 - Previous research has shown that the oral administration of Bifidobacterium infantis Natren Life Start super strain (NLS-SS) reduces of gastro-intestinal symptoms in untreated celiac disease patients. The reduction of symptoms was not connected with changes in intestinal permeability or serum levels of cytokines, chemokines, or growth factors. Therefore, researchers suspected that the reduction of symptoms might be related to the modulation of innate immunity. To test that hypothesis, a team of researchers set out to assess the potential mechanisms of a probiotic B.infantis Natren Life Start super strain on the mucosal expression of innate immune markers in adult patients with active untreated celiac disease compared with those treated with B. infantis 6 weeks and after 1 year of gluten-free diet. The research team included Maria I. Pinto-Sanchez, MD, Edgardo C. Smecuol, MD, Maria P. Temprano,RD, Emilia Sugai, BSBC, Andrea Gonzalez, RD, PhD, Maria L. Moreno,MD, Xianxi Huang, MD, PhD, Premysl Bercik, MD, Ana Cabanne, MD, Horacio Vazquez, MD, Sonia Niveloni, MD, Roberto Mazure, MD, Eduardo Mauriño, MD, Elena F. Verdú, MD, PhD, and Julio C. Bai, MD. They are affiliated with the Medicine Department, Farcombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; the Small Intestinal Section, Department of Medicine and the Department of Alimentation at Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo, Gastroenterology Hospital and Research Institute at the Universidad del Salvador in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The team determined the numbers of macrophages and Paneth cells, along with the expression of a-defensin-5 expression via immunohistochemistry in duodenal biopsies. Their results showed that a gluten-free diet lowers duodenal macrophage counts in celiac disease patients more effectively than B. infantis, while B. infantis lowers Paneth cell counts and reduces expression of a-defensin-5. This study documents the differential innate immune effects of treatment with B. infantis compared with 1 year of gluten-free diet. The team calls for further study to better understand the synergistic effects of gluten-free diet and B. infantis supplementation in celiac disease. Source: J Clin Gastroenterol
  3. I got test results back from a leaky gut/gut immunity and candida stool and saliva test. Here are the results: I have very low slgA (gut immunity) and a very high yeast colonization in my mouth. The gut immunity is the main one i'm concerned about and have always suspected. I met with nutritionist yesterday and she put me on a food plan and gave me a supplement with the mixture of prebiotics, probiotics and digestive enzymes in them and also an iron supplement. I've been on it since yesterday and actually feel a bit worse today so i'm getting worried already. I really want this to work. She seemed confident i could heal my gut in no time though. Is there anyone who's gone through a similar situation that i can talk to or just anyone with some knowledge on this sort of thing?
  4. I have a few things I would like to talk about. The following are excellent. AL-90 Digestive Enzymes by Allegany Nutrition. Gut-pro by Corganic. Both are Gluten and Corn Free, no fillers, very pure. If you have stopped eating gluten and are still feeling sick etc, corn might be the problem. Many gluten free products use corn as an assumed safe grain substitute. Are you buying into this myth? A Study published in the journal Gut identified that corn gluten caused an inflammatory reaction in patients with celiac disease. “The observation that corn gluten challenge induced an abnormal NO reaction in some of our patients with celiac disease is intriguing as maize is considered safe and is recommended as the substitute cereal in a gluten free diet.” Source: Gut. 2005; 54:769-774. Gluten Free Society’s Stance Corn is a grain. Corn has gluten. Many believe that corn gluten does not induce damage the same way that wheat, barley, and rye do. The fact of the matter is, gluten has not been studied adequately. Most of what we know about celiac disease and gluten have to do with gliadin (the gluten found in wheat only). As a nutritionist with over 10 years of experience guiding those with gluten sensitivity, I have seen corn be a severe problem for the majority of gluten intolerant patients. Many claim that they don’t react to corn and feel fine after eating it. The same can be said of those with silent celiac disease. Remember that a lack of symptoms does not mean that internal damage is not occurring. All of that being said, we should not make assumptions. Common sense and intelligent thought should be used as a basis for our dietary decisions. Gluten aside, consider the following about corn: It is the second most commonly genetically modified food on the planet (soy is #1) Genetic modification of foods continues to kill animals in scientific studies. It is an incomplete protein. It is difficult for humans to digest (ever see corn in your stool?) It is high in calories and low in nutrient value It is a new food to the human genome. It is being used as a staple food for our cattle, fish, chicken, and cars. Cows and fish are not designed to eat grain. (Have you ever seen a fish jump out of a lake into a corn field for supper?) When animals eat corn as a staple they have shorter life spans. Corn fed beef is linked to heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and obesity. Grass fed beef is not. Fructose derived from corn is toxic to the liver and contributes to severe health issues. Corn syrup has mercury in it. The list can go on and on and on… Many consumers bow to the alter of “Gluten Free” packaged foods as if the label is a safety net. “Gluten Free” on the package does not mean that the food is healthy. Do not deny yourself the God given right to be healthy. Remember, corn has gluten. The gluten in corn has not been adequately studied. Many studies to date have shown that corn induces inflammatory damage in those with gluten sensitivity. Almost half of all celiac patients don’t get better on a wheat, rye, and barley free diet. Is their a link between corn and refractory celiac disease? At this point in time we do not know for sure, but 10 years of clinical experience with gluten intolerant patients reacting to corn is enough data for me. Read more at https://www.glutenfreesociety.org/corn-gluten-damages-celiac-patients/#k6zhsrdZMK82e0Vi.99
  5. Celiac.com 10/09/2017 - New trial data suggests that the probiotic strains Lactobacillus plantarum Heal 9 and Lactobacillus paracasei 8700:2 may provide support for the immune system and delay the onset of gluten intolerance in children. The findings, recently presented at the International Celiac Disease Symposium in New Delhi, suggest that Probi's patented probiotic strains have a 'surprisingly consistent' effect on suppressing coeliac autoimmunity and may delay the onset of the disease in children who are genetically pre-disposed to the condition. "To our knowledge this is the first time a probiotic study has been performed on this specific population and the results show immune-supporting properties of these probiotics as well as a potential preventive effect on the development of celiac disease," said Dr Daniel Agardh of Lund University. Agardh and colleagues identified and recruited 78 children with a genetic pre-disposition to coeliac disease. The children were as a subpopulation in a multinational and multiyear autoimmunity study with thousands of children. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial lasted six months and found that disease-related antibodies were significantly reduced in the probiotic group and significantly increased in the placebo group during the course of the study. Results show that the probiotic strains had a suppressing effect on celiac autoimmunity and may delay the onset of the disease – with tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA) decreased in the treatment group, but increased in the placebo group. In addition, several significant differences were observed between the groups on a cellular level indicating that the probiotic may counteract coeliac disease-associated ongoing immunological and inflammatory response. "This is an excellent example of a well working collaboration between academia and the industry" commented Probi CEO Peter Nählstedt. "We see a growing interest in children's probiotics and these results enable Probi to build a product platform for children." Read more at: Nutraingredients.com
  6. Before I get into the neurological symptoms, let me give you a synopsis of my background and family history. Both my parents smoke and my dad was always a heavy drinker. My mom had GERD / Acid Reflux pretty much her whole life and it should be noted that she's basically 100% Norwegian (I've read that Northern Europeans have GERD and gastrointestinal issues more than anyone else - same with the Irish). My mom was also recently tested positive for Celiac Disease (our diets growing up was filled with wheat products, so connecting the dots here, I think she was being bombarded with gluten and her body couldn't handle it). She would have severe mood swings, especially towards my dad (who is now passed on). Her acid reflux got so bad that she went in for an endoscopy and they told her that she had Barrett's Esophagus. She's still alive to this day though and seems to be holding up reasonably well. My sister also has severe acid reflux and panic attacks. Now to get to my own history. I was born in 1983. As a baby, I had severe eczema, and would rub certain areas of my body (such as my wrists) raw on the carpet, because I was constantly itchy. I would also constantly spit up breast-milk and even the baby formula. My parents had a hard time figuring out what to feed me! We would also drink tons of cow's milk. That finally hit a brick wall around age 25 (in 2008), when I started noticing that if I drank straight cow's milk I would end up with (and still do end up with if I drink it) sulfur burps which taste and smell like rotten eggs. I even tried drinking raw cow's milk one time and the result was the same, I was burping rotten egg smelling burps and would get diarrhea! This is also around the time when I noticed my acid reflux getting worse and worse. In 2009, I started lifting weights again after taking a long break from high school. When I would do any squatting motion exercises such as dead-lifts or squats, I'd almost pass out because I couldn't catch my breath afterwards. I finally went in for an endoscopy and they told me that my esophagus was raw and red. I also should note that I've read getting anesthesia and all the drugs they give you during that time, can cause long-term psychological issues, especially anxiety, which I never really had until after that year. I realized that I couldn't do those squatting exercises or anything that put pressure on the abdomen area, since it would push acid back up into my esophagus. I decided to start lifting weights on an empty stomach and that did work for awhile but I couldn't figure out why my acid reflux was still so bad. Acid shooting back up into the esophagus, is caused by inflammation. This affects the Vagus Nerve (which is the longest cranial nerve). Some of the main functions of the Vagus Nerve include, 1. Breathing 2. Speech 3. Sweating 4. Helping in keeping the larynx open during breathing 5. Monitoring and regulating the heartbeat 6. Informing the brain of the food that is ingested and food that has been digested 7. The Vagus Nerve performs the major function of emptying the gastric region of food Any damage to the vagus nerve causes Gastroparesis which is losing the muscular function in the stomach and intestines. This results in food being emptied slowly, that leads to other problems such as fermentation of food in the stomach and food getting compressed into hard pellets which can cause severe problems if the pellets get stuck in the intestine. Especially in people with diabetes, when sugar levels get high and are not well controlled, it can result in the vagus nerve damage. This can result in anxiety / panic attacks, OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder), trouble swallowing, chills, asthma-like symptoms, heart palpitations, tingling / numbness in extremities and limbs, blood in the stool, hard of breathing, anxiety attack-like symptoms, canker sores, nightmares (including hypnogogic and hypnopompic auditory / visual hallucinations, such as hearing a gun shot upon waking up, even though no gun was fired), dry mouth, heart attack-like symptoms, and more (I had all these symptoms too btw). I believe that since our bodies are intolerant to wheat and dairy products, it is causing inflammation in the body, which then causes all these other symptoms. So at that point, I began having hallucinations (including hypnopompic and hypnagogic hallucinations). They were mainly auditory hallucinations and some (but fewer) visual hallucinations. They started around 2013, when I got sick with the flu and also had an in-grown toenail (I had to get it cut out by the doctor and it was the worst pain of my life!). I was extremely religious back then (I left my faith last year at end of 2015) and felt like these were omens or signs for some of the things that were deemed ‘sinful’. I then had a breakup with a gluten-free who lived in Montana and the auditory hallucinations continued. I’ve been having them again starting in 2016 after getting sick with a chest respiratory infection (I’m seeing a trend here with getting sick and having these), which I believe were caused by the Autumn Rhinitis / Hay Fever Allergies. I was at the gym around the start of August 2016, and I felt like I couldn’t catch my breath after each set of lifting. I went home and haven’t been back to the gym since. I was having trouble breathing just walking up a flight of stairs, and it was a daily nightmare until I started looking into ways to help solve my issues (which I’ll get into in a minute). I also don’t have a great sleep schedule from working late night shifts, so I’m typically always sleep deprived. I should also mention that I think I have formed P.T.S.D. (PTSD - Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) from watching a music video where it showed a death. The image of the woman dying kept playing in my head (this also happened around August 2016). Then on top of all that, I was lifting weights 2 times a week (full body workouts), doing H.I.I.T. (High Intensity Interval Training) a couple times a week in the morning, AND working night shifts. On top of all that, my dad died last year (October 3, 2015) and within a week afterwards around October 10th, I ended up with appendicitis so I had to get the appendectomy surgery to get my appendix removed. A few weeks later, I walked away from my faith (not due to emotional reasons, but due to extensive research, which was already in the process starting at the beginning of 2015). So I lost my dad, my faith and my appendix within a month's time period. It put a lot of stress on me I think. I’m 33 years old, so still somewhat young, but I think I was pushing my body to the limit, and it’s been affecting my brain chemistry. Not only that, but recently, I put the other dots to the puzzle and found out that I also have gluten intolerance / Celiac / Coeliac, so I’ve stopped eating gluten (and dairy) products. I also have done a few sessions of AAT (Advanced Allergy Therapy), by a doctor named Dr. Jill Cohn in the San Francisco / Berkeley / Oakland Bay Area. You don’t even have to be there in person for her to treat you, she does it all online through a conference call on a site similar to Skype. You can watch testimonials on YouTube as well, and I’m here to tell you that her system did cure me of Ragweed allergies. I now understand that because I was pushing my body to the limit as well as trying to stay 500 calories below maintenance (to cut fat and get shredded), that my body wasn’t getting the proper nutrients and vitamins due to eating wheat and gluten (as well as dairy). This damages the alveoli and villi in the intestinal tract which are crucial for absorbing the nutrients from your food. I also found out that my body reacts poorly to chocolate as well. Chocolate is a 'stimulant' and has been proven to affect the brain the same way that cannabis / marijuana will. This could be some of the problems you all are facing as well. At that point, your body is so run down, that it will start attacking ‘harmless’ invaders, such as ragweed pollen, pet dander or even just simple dust particles, which this process of your body in attack mode, will cause inflammation, hence the reason I was having trouble breathing (my body developed exercise-induced / allergy-induced asthma). Not only that, but when your body is so run down and not getting the proper nutrition, it can cause psychosis and schizophrenic symptoms as well! I started taking a ton of supplements and they’ve helped tremendously. Here are a few to get you started. Try these and eat a balanced diet for a couple months. I’ll bet you start to feel better and the hallucinations diminish. 1. Vitamin D3 (Jarrow Brand 5,000IU – take two to four per day) – This is especially necessary if you live above the 37 degree parallel (latitude) in the Fall and Winter (typically from September to March). The sun only produces Vitamin D3 in our body when it is 50 degrees (altitude not temperature) above the horizon and even during the Spring and Summer, this only occurs from around 10AM in the morning to 2-3PM in the afternoon. So you have only a 4 to 5 hour window in the morning to afternoon when the sun is producing Vitamin D3, which most people aren't really out during those times, because of work schedule. This is why around 75 to 80% of the world population are D3 deficient! A good source of information on this is Dr. John Cannell. Go research how vital and important D3 is for us! You want your ng/ml (nano-grams per milliliter of blood) to be from 50 to 100 (or even slightly over 100 is fine too!). 2. Magnesium (CALM BRAND) – Magnesium is the driver for Vitamin D3. It’s very important and we don’t get enough of it in our diet on average. 3. Vitamin C (take around 2,000mg per day) – Look up Dr. Thomas Levy and Dr. Linus Pauling for good information on this. The Liposomal type of Vitamin C is the best kind! 4. Vitamin K2 (different from Vitamin K1 – Get the Jarrow Brand called Vitamin K-Right) – Millions of people take calcium supplements to maintain healthy bones. Yet few patients or physicians realize that optimizing bone integrity involves more than taking a single mineral supplement. A critical additional component for bone and cardiovascular health is vitamin K2. Recent research has revealed that, without vitamin K2, calcium regulation is disrupted. In fact, low levels of vitamin K2 are associated with an increased risk of heart disease and atherosclerosis. K2 is the gateway that allows calcium to get to your bones. When you take vitamin D3, your body creates more of these vitamin K2-dependent proteins, the proteins that will move the calcium around. They have a lot of potential health benefits. But until the K2 comes in to activate those proteins, those benefits aren't realized. So, really, if you're taking vitamin D, you're creating an increased demand for K2. And vitamin D and K2 work together to strengthen your bones and improve your heart health.For so long, we've been told to take calcium for osteoporosis... and vitamin D3, which we know is helpful. But then, more studies are coming out showing that increased calcium intake is causing more heart attacks and strokes. That created a lot of confusion around whether calcium is safe or not. But that's the wrong question to be asking, because we'll never properly understand the health benefits of calcium or vitamin D3, unless we take into consideration K2. That's what keeps the calcium in its right place. 5. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) Ubiquinol – it’s a substance similar to a vitamin. It is found in every cell of the body. Your body makes CoQ10, and your cells use it to produce energy your body needs for cell growth and maintenance. It also functions as an antioxidant, which protects the body from damage caused by harmful molecules. (Get the Jarrow Brand – no I don’t work for them, but I’ve heard they are the best in all of these, and it’s what I take). 6. Vitamin B-Right (Jarrow) which has all of the B vitamins in it. Niacin (B3) has proven to be very helpful for those with Schizophrenia and Psychosis. Look up Dr. Abram Hoffer and his research on mental illness and Niacin. Careful with Niacin in huge quantities, as it will cause a 'flushing' effect, but you still want enough to get the benefits. 7. Oxylent (which is one of the best tasting and best multi-vitamins out there in my opinion). It’s got most of all you need in there when included with what I mentioned above. (Those are the main ones above, but here are a few other supplements I take. ChlorOxygen, Serrapeptase {SerraGold Brand}, mushroom supplement called 'Breathe' by New Chapter Life-shield, HealthForce Green Alchemy Protein Powder, HealthForce Vitamineral Green, Probiotics, MSM, Bragg's Apple Cider Vinegar, local honey, and avocados for potassium, along with getting at least a half gallon of water per day - which I drink at least 32 oz. to 50 oz. of water on an empty stomach every morning). Within a month of taking all this (I started on November 2nd, 2016), I’m now feeling about 95% back to my normal self. The other 5% is caused by my poor sleeping habits, as well as stress. I now realize that these psychological issues were all subconscious from the heavy religious indoctrination. If I had never been introduced to these religious ideas, I’m sure I’d not have these particular religious themed hypnopompic and hypnagogic hallucinations. When it first started, I was seeing visuals such as numbers and objects floating in the air upon waking up, which, they’d disappear within a few seconds. I also hear voices, which would say terrible things, and then the voices would continue in my head as if it were having dialogue with me in my own mind. I would feel like God hated me, due to the content of what was being said. I’m pretty sure I have some sort of religious trauma after leaving my faith and also, after my dad dying within the last year (2015). They actually have a name for this type of PTSD and it’s RTS (Religious Trauma Syndrome). You can find some good material through Dr. Marlene Winell online if you suffer from the religious form of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder). Anyways, I hope all of this helps someone else who may be going through similar! Just know you’re not alone and it’s more than likely happening because of nutrient deficiency and/or a traumatic experience you suffered as well as your diet if you are gluten intolerant / lactose intolerant. These aren’t devils, demons, hobgoblins or ghouls harassing you, this is all natural phenomena and it can be treated with the right diet, the right supplements and proper sleep! I am still getting cross-contaminated (or there is a cross-reactor food that mimics gluten and/or dairy) somewhere in my diet, so my psychological issues persist, including waking up feeling like something is trying to talk to me in my mind. I am trying to figure that out now. But they also have supplements you can take that will break down gluten if you are accidentally 'glutened.' Here is a study I found from WW2, that correlates to mental disease and gluten / wheat below. "One of the first hints that these circumstances could have implications for the psychological sciences was the observation that, in several countries, hospitalization rates for schizophrenia during World War II dropped in direct proportion to wheat shortages. In the United States, where over that same period the consumption of wheat rose rather than diminished, such rates increased instead (Dohan, 1966a,b). In South Pacific islands with a traditionally low consumption of wheat, schizophrenia was only found in 1 person out of 30,000. When Western grain products were introduced into their society, it dramatically rose to 1 person out of 100! (Dohan et al., 1984)."
  7. A team of researchers has announced what they are calling a 'pivotal advance' regarding the differential influence of bifidobacteria and gram-negative bacteria on immune responses to inflammatory triggers in celiac disease. Their study provides strong evidence that various intestinal bacteria in celiac patients can influence inflammation, and that dietary probiotics and prebiotics can help improve the quality of life for patients with celiac and other associated diseases, such as type 1 diabetes and various autoimmune disorders. To conduct their study, they the team used cultures of human peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as in vitro models. This was possible because blood monocytes constantly replenish intestinal mucosal monocytes, and accurately represent an in vivo situation. To duplicate the intestinal environment surrounding celiac disease, researchers exposed cell cultures to Gram-negative bacteria and bifidobacteria they had isolated from celiac patients, both alone and in the presence of disease triggers. They then assessed the effects on surface marker expression and cytokine production by PBMCs. Gram-negative bacteria induced higher pro-inflammatory cytokines than did bifidobacteria. The Gram-negative bacteria also up-regulated expression of cell surface markers involved in inflammatory aspects of the disease, while bifidobacteria up-regulated the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Research team still need to confirm the results in clinical trials on people, but the findings offer the first support for new treatment options that may change how celiac disease is treated and possibly prevented. In the same way the certain foods may contribute to poor health, notes Louis Montaner, D.V.M., M.Sc., D.Phil. Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, "others can have positive effects. For people with celiac disease, this opens a line of research into new therapies that may be as accessible as a grocer's shelf." SOURCE: Journal of Leukocyte Biology. 2010;87:765-778.
  8. In my work as an author, researcher, and gluten-free advocate, I strive to raise awareness for celiac disease and gluten intolerance because I know that with increased awareness will come more research, more proper diagnoses, and even improved treatment. Illustrating this, studies linking the onset of celiac disease to changes in microbes in the digestive tract are not only addressing the question of delayed onset, but they may lead to new research that could eventually result in a probiotic treatment for celiacs. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease. The source of this being gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye, affecting about one percent of the population of 300 million Americans. It works by attacking the villi, the finger-like structures which line the small intestine, resulting in stomach problems and malabsorption of nutrients. Left untreated, the disease can cause severe health conditions and complications such as mental illness, osteoporosis, anemia, miscarriage, and even cancer. Alessio Fasano, professor of pediatrics, medicine and physiology as well as the director of the Mucosal Biology Research Center and the Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, has been researching celiac disease, paying particular attention to the way intestinal “permeability” influences the development of disease. In an article, published in Scientific American, called “Surprises from Celiac Disease,” Dr. Fasano poses the question of why some celiacs, who are born genetically predisposed to develop the disease, develop symptoms later than others. He suggests that reason for this is associated with the microbiome—the community of bacteria or microbes—living in the digestive tract. According to Dr. Fasano, the digestive tract microbiome varies among individuals and even in the same individual over the course of a lifetime. What’s more, Dr. Fasano says they can also have an effect on the genes which are active in their host. Therefore, someone genetically predisposed to celiac disease may have been able to handle gluten for quite some time, but upon shifting of the microbiome, and a subsequent activation of the gluten intolerance gene, the symptoms of celiac disease will show themselves. Not only do Dr. Fasano’s studies shed light into a question that has been perplexing researchers, but it also opens the door to a treatment for, or even prevention of, celiac disease—good bacteria for the digestive track, otherwise known as “probiotics.” I spent years running in circles from doctor to doctor trying to find the cause of my painful symptoms, finally driving me to research my symptoms on my own. I’m grateful to have been properly diagnosed, but managing the gluten-free diet can be a challenge. The prospect of a treatment such as probiotics to offset genetic factors will appeal to many celiacs like myself. Although the treatment for celiac disease is simple, it calls for a lot of work and can be disheartening at times, requiring a total lifestyle change. With Dr. Fasano’s celiac disease research, we can look forward to more research, more awareness, and perhaps another treatment option. Meanwhile, let’s keep doing our parts to raise awareness and funds for celiac disease research.
  9. Celiac.com 04/09/2014 - The human gastrointestinal tract contains approximately 1014 bacterial cells that form a unique, diverse and very dynamic microbial ecosystem also known as gut microbiota. The genomes of all intestinal microbes form the “microbiome”, representing more than 100 times the human genome. The composition of gut microbiota is crucial for human health. Normal gut microbiota enhances digestive processes, produces certain vitamins and nutrients, facilitates absorptive processes, participates in development and maturation of the immune system and limits colonization of the gut by pathogenic microorganisms. It has been demonstrated that the following predominant microorganisms constitute for the normal gut microbiota: Bacteroides, Clostridium, Eubacterium, Veillonella, Ruminococcus, Bifidobacterium, Fusobacterium, Lactobacillus, Peptostreptococcus and Peptococcus. Diet is a major environmental factor influencing gut microbiota diversity and functionality. Abnormalities in the composition of normal gut microbiota, also known as dysbiosis, frequently result in the development of chronic inflammatory, autoimmune and atopic processes not only within the gut but also in the distant body compartments such as skin, exocrine glands, the brain, muscles and joints. It is well recognized that people affected by poorly controlled celiac disease have detectable dysbiosis. Compared to healthy individuals, people with active celiac disease are characterized by higher numbers of Gram-negative bacteria, known to activate pro-inflammatory processes, and lower numbers of Gram-positive bacteria benefiting the gastrointestinal tract and anti-inflammatory responses. Furthermore, recent studies of children with celiac disease showed that even a strict compliance with a gluten-free diet does not completely restore the normal gut microbiota. Di Cagno and colleagues analyzed the composition of gut microbiota in children with celiac disease on a strict gluten-free diet as compared to a group of matched, non-celiac controls. The study showed that the levels of Lactobacillus, Enterococcus and Bifidobacteria were significantly higher in fecal samples from healthy children rather than from celiac children. On the contrary, cell counts of potentially pathogenic microorganisms such as Bacteroides, Staphylococcus, Salmonella, Shighella and Klebsiella were significantly higher in celiac children compared to healthy children. Based on the aforementioned data, it is obvious to propose that probiotics, defined as viable microorganisms benefiting gastrointestinal health, may serve as a valuable addition to the maintenance protocols for those with celiac disease. Well established probiotic effects include: Beneficial effects on dysbiosis including control of yeast (Candida albicans) overgrowth Facilitation of pathogenic bacteria elimination (for example, Clostridium difficile and Helicobacter pylori) Reduction of local and systemic inflammatory responses Prevention of autoimmune and allergic reactions Prevention and treatment of antibiotic-associated diarrhea Normalization of intestinal contractions and stool consistency Reduction of the concentration of cancer-promoting enzymes and metabolites in the gut Prevention of upper respiratory and urogenital infections Cholesterol-lowering activity Experimental data indicate that probiotics can benefit celiac disease. Lindfors K. and colleagues showed that live probiotic, Bifidobacterium lactis, bacteria inhibit the toxic effects induced by wheat gliadin in intestinal epithelial cell culture. Papista C. et al. demonstrated (in a mouse model) that probiotics can prevent intestinal damage of celiac disease. The published data on the beneficial effects of probiotics in celiac patients is limited. Our clinical experience (Institute for Specialized Medicine – www.ifsmed.com) indicates that appropriately selected probiotics significantly reduce diarrhea and bloating in patients with gluten intolerance and celiac disease. Furthermore, we see positive reduction of gluten-associated joint and muscle pain, fatigue and brain fog as well as on gut colonization with yeast. Probiotics also normalize markers of inflammation (for example, C-reactive protein) and markers of mucosal immune responses (for example, fecal secretory immunoglobulin A – sIgA). Typically, the benefits of probiotics administration cannot be seen instantly. It takes at least 4-6 months to see measurable benefits. The choice of probiotics is another difficult issue for an inexperienced consumer. The following probiotic strains may benefit those with celiac disease and gluten intolerance: a. Lactobacillus acidophilus is a species of Lactobacilli which occurs naturally in the human and animal gastrointestinal tract and in many dairy products. The L. acidophilus strain DDS-1 is one of the best characterized probiotic strains in the world. The medicinal properties of L. acidophilus DDS-1 include: production of lactic acid supporting good bacteria in the gut, production of B and K vitamins, prevention of colon cancer, prevention of ‘traveler’s diarrhea’, inhibition of gastric/duodenal ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori, reduction of symptoms of eczema and atopic dermatitis, reduction of serum cholesterol level, fermentation of lactose and reduction of symptoms of lactose intolerance, and reduction of intestinal pain. b. Lactobacillus plantarum is a Gram-positive bacterium naturally found in many fermented food products including sauerkraut, pickles, brined olives, Korean kimchi, sourdough, and other fermented plant material, and also some cheeses, fermented sausages, and stockfish. The medicinal properties of L. plantarum include: production of D- and L-isomers of lactic acid feeding beneficial gut bacteria, production of hydrogen peroxide killing pathogenic bacteria, production of enzymes (proteases) degrading soy protein and helping people with soy intolerance, synthesis of amino-acid L-lysine that promotes absorption of calcium and the building of muscle tissue, production of enzymes (proteases) digesting animal proteins such as gelatin and helping people with pancreatic insufficiency. c. Lactobacillus casei is a species of Lactobacilli found in the human intestine and mouth. The medicinal properties of L. casei include: production of lactic acid assisting propagation of desirable bacteria in the gut, fermentation of lactose and helping people with lactose intolerance, fermentation of beans causing flatulence upon digestion. d. Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a species of Lactobacilli found in yogurt and other dairy products. The medicinal properties of L. rhamnosus include: production of lactic acid supporting good bacteria in the gut, production of bacteriocins and hydrogen peroxide killing pathogenic bacteria, prevention of diarrhea of various nature, prevention of upper respiratory infections, reduction of symptoms of eczema and atopic dermatitis, affecting GABA neurotransmitting pathway and reducing symptoms of anxiety. e. Lactobacillus salivarius is a species of Lactobacilli isolated from saliva. The medicinal properties of L. salivarius include: production of lactic acid supporting good bacteria in the gut, reduction of inflammatory processes causing colitis and inflammatory arthritis, prevention of colon cancer. f. Bifidobacterium bifidus is a Gram-positive bacterium which is a ubiquitous inhabitant of the human gastrointestinal tract. B. bifidus are capable of fermenting various polysaccharides of animal and plant origin. The medicinal properties of B. bifidus include: production of hydrogen peroxide killing pathogenic bacteria, modulation of local immune responses, production of vitamins B, K and folic acid, prevention of colon cancer, bioconversion of a number of dietary compounds into bioactive molecules. g. Bifidobacterium lactis is a Gram-positive bacterium which is found in the large intestines of humans. The medicinal properties of B. lactis include: production of hydrogen peroxide killing pathogenic bacteria, modulation of local immune responses, production of vitamins B, K and folic acid, prevention of colon cancer. h. Lactococcus lactis is a Gram-positive bacterium used in the production of buttermilk and cheese. The medicinal properties of L. lactis include: production of lactic acid supporting good bacteria in the gut, prevention of colon cancer, fermentation of lactose and reduction of symptoms of lactose intolerance. i. Saccharomyces boulardii is a probiotic strain of yeast first isolated from lychee and mangosteen fruit. Upon consumption, S. boulardii remains within the gastrointestinal lumen, and maintains and restores the natural flora in the large and small intestine. There are numerous randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled studies showing the efficacy of S. boulardii in the treatment and prevention of various gastrointestinal disorders. Potential indications for use of Saccharomyces boulardii in humans include: 1) diarrhea/traveler’s diarrhea/antibiotic-associated diarrhea, 2) infection with Clostridium difficile/pseudomembranous colitis, 3) irritable bowel syndrome, 4) ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, 5) partial IgA deficiency, 6)peptic-ulcer disease due to Helicobacter pylori. Published data also indicate that enzymes produced by S. boulardii can digest alpha-gliadin and related molecules. j. Bacillus coagulans, also known as Lactobacillus sporogenes, is a gram-positive, spore-forming probiotic which is characterized by the increased survival in acidic gastric environment and in bile-acid-associated duodenal environment as compared to the commonly used probiotic microorganisms. Bacillus coagulans do not adhere to the human intestinal epithelium and is completely eliminated in four to five days unless chronic administration is maintained. Once in the intestines, Bacillus coagulans is activated and releases anti-inflammatory molecules or acts indirectly to eradicate organisms in the gut responsible for the inflammatory immune response. Activated Bacillus coagulans produces bacteriocins and lowers local pH by producing L(+) lactic acid that, along with competition for sites of mucosal adherence, works to dislodge and eliminate any antagonizing microbes that may be contributing to an inflammatory response. Bacillus coagulans also produces short-chain fatty acids such as butyric acid, a compound known to support the health and healing of cells in the small and large intestines and to contribute to modulation of the mucosal immune system. To achieve therapeutic responses, the daily dose of the probiotics should be at least 25 billion CFUs (colony-forming units) and above. We recommend taking probiotics on an empty stomach either 20-30 minutes before breakfast or one-two hours after dinner with plenty of fluids. In those taking antibiotics, the time of the probiotic administration needs to be spaced out from that of antibiotics for at least several hours. References: Papista C, Gerakopoulos V, Kourelis A, Sounidaki M, Kontana A, Berthelot L, Moura IC, Monteiro RC, Yiangou M. Gluten induces coeliac-like disease in sensitised mice involving IgA, CD71 and transglutaminase 2 interactions that are prevented by probiotics. Lab Invest. 2012 Feb 13. doi: 10.1038/labinvest.2012.13. Sanz Y, De Pama G, Laparra M. Unraveling the ties between celiac disease and intestinal microbiota. Int Rev Immunol. 2011 Aug;30(4):207-18. de Vrese M, Schrezenmeir J. Probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics. Adv Biochem Eng Biotechnol. 2008;111:1-66. Lindfors K, Blomqvist T, Juuti-Uusitalo K, Stenman S, Venäläinen J, Mäki M, Kaukinen K. Live probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis bacteria inhibit the toxic effects induced by wheat gliadin in epithelial cell culture. Clin Exp Immunol. 2008 Jun;152(3):552-8. Raffaella Di Cagno, Maria De Angelis, Ilaria De Pasquale, Maurice Ndagijimana, Pamela Vernocchi, Patrizia Ricciuti, Francesca Gagliardi, Luca Laghi, Carmine Crecchio, Maria Elisabetta Guerzoni, Marco Gobbetti, Ruggiero Francavilla. Duodenal and faecal microbiota of celiac children: molecular, phenotype and metabolome characterization. BMC Microbiology 2011, 11:219.
  10. Hi Everyone, I'm new to the forum. I've been gluten free since 10/26/2013 and am still struggling. I have confirmed celiac's disease from both blood work and biopsies taken during an endoscopy. I didn't have much help in the beginning besides to just stop eating gluten. I did that immediately with no issues and I am not getting cross contamination. It is not in my house. I did replace all necessary kitchen items.. collanders, toaster, etc. Got new butter, jams, etc. I don't lick envelopes and it is not in my toothpaste, lipstick so on and so forth. I'm struggling. Some symptoms have gotten worse. I am still ill in the bathroom every morning. I feel internal inflammation all the time. I'm waiting for appointments with rheumatology (later in March) and endocrinology (beginning of April) because of various symptoms. A neurologist is also working on ruling out MS. I cut out dairy last month (not in the beginning/was told it was not necessary) and now I've pretty much cut out everything else (rice, potato, soy) because I'm desperate to feel better. I've been eating plain fruit, veggies, meat - no seasonings/sauce. Chicken broth. Coffee (yes, it is gluten free) once in the morning and green tea or chamomile. Because of my vitamin D level and ferritin level I am taking the following each day Calcium w vitamin D3 twice a day, a multi vitamin, iron, b-12. Also on 20mg of omeprazole every morning because of my esophagus. I also drink Kefir probiotic smoothie twice a day. (Could that maybe be making me worse?! Just a thought that came to me today) Along with celiac's disease so far I've been diagnosed with Barrett's Esophagus and was told I have osteomalacia. I could share the lifetime of issues (migraines, miscarriages, difficult menstrual cycles, etc, etc) that now seem eye opening but the above are the basics. Should I really still be struggling so much? This has been so difficult. I wish a doctor could tell me that I'm going to be okay. Thank you for any responses that come my way. Looking forward to getting to know you. ~Julie edited to add more: my Celiac diagnosis came after a very long year of many, many doctor appts. I lost 38lbs from Feb until diagnosis, I would fall for no reason, I have neuropathy, terrible periods, mood swings near period and ovulation, not sleeping well, night sweats, anemia, difficulty with things I was able to do before, completely beat all the time, skin issues (don't have DH), joint, muscle, vein issues... I started going to the doctor religiously in the fall of 2012 and by the beginning of Oct 2013 still did not have a diagnosis besides to reduce stress and take care of myself.
  11. I know many people have mentioned a neurological connection to their celiac. I am wondering about a few things: A recent spike in my anxiety, the connection between gut inflammation and anxiety, and how much probiotic one should take. I have had anxiety since high school, but it had always been manageable with the right exercise and work load. But since early October my anxiety has been through the roof. To make things worse, I was fired within weeks of the stress event that sparked the anxiety. Now I am unemployed and unsure of how I will pay rent after this month. NOT helpful to my anxiety (though having time to take long walks, do crafts that calm me, and having the freedom to leave any event when I start to feel antsy is nice). So, I came across this article on a UCLA study about how probiotics can directly reduce anxiety by improving gut health. I know that when I take my CeliAct multi-vitamins I feel way better in general. But I am not sure if I am ok to eat yogurt or drink kefir in addition to these probiotic loaded vitamins. Does anyone know how much probiotic is enough, or how much is too much? Also, does anyone else experience anxiety as a symptom of their celiac disease? I've been dx'd since 5/11/12 but I know I am still healing. I bought fish oil to try and help fight inflammation. Do you have any other food or vitamine tips that might help lessen anxiety? (If you can't tell, I don't want to take any prescription drugs to deal with this business...)
  12. Hi All, I was just wondering if any of you have had much experience with and/or success with cultured foods. Have you had any improvements from eating/drinking them? Does culturing them help you to be able to eat foods that you otherwise wouldn't be able to eat? I have had some great results so far from various types of cultured food. It's one of the only ways I have been able to eat many vegetables until just recently. I can eat sourdough bread made out of rice flour, and milk that has been made into kefir. I would love to hear other peoples experiences.
  13. Hello, I recently just joined and find this forum to be very helpful. After two long years of all sorts of weird issues (joint pain, numbness and tingling, acid reflux) and thousands of dollars in medical bills with no answers for my symptoms turns out about 3 weeks ago monday my biopsy and blood test came back positive for Celiac Disease.. FINALLY looks like i may have an answer. Long story short my doctor is having me take Nutrametrix supplements ( ORAC, OPC-3, B-Complex, Might-a-mins, Aloe Vera Juice, and a Probiotic) To treat the nausea and burning sensation in my gut. Have any of you taken these supplements? Have they helped you? ORAC OPC-3 2x daily empty stomach Activated-B Complex Nutriclean Probiotic 2x daily before meals Might-a-mins after/or before meals or PRN (as needed) Aloe Juice natural flavor 2oz 4-5x as PRN
  14. My daughter, diagnosed celiac in November, so gluten free nearly two months now, is having a hard time no matter what she eats. She has a tremendous amount of damage - seen on her endoscopy / colonoscopy - and her GI told us that it will take 6 months to a year for her body to heal. My question is what have are you taking to promote healing? I would like to add digestive enzymes, more probiotics (currently she eats yogurt and drinks kefir), and maybe Vitamin C in addition to the multivitamins she takes. What has worked for you? I can't stand watching her suffer after eating for a year! I know that we probably need to cut out the dairy, but she is very resistant to this. For those of you who have cut out milk, do you have an easier time with cheeses? I am open to suggestions and trying to learn -- all of this is still quite new to us.
  15. Since Probiotics are a frequent subject here, I thought it appropriate to post Dr. H. R. Peter Green's statement at the 2012 CDF Conference, as published in Celiac Disease Foundation INSIGHT publication (fall 2012): "There is no evidence that probiotics are of any value in celiac disease to my knowledge, and people should be very careful, because this is all a non-regulated or poorly regulated industry. And you don't know where these things are coming from, really don't know what's in them. To my knowledge, they haven't been proven to be harmful, but they haven't proven to be helpful either." ...just food for though.
  16. Celiac.com 04/28/2008 - A life-long gluten-free diet is currently the only treatment for celiac disease. However, many foods thought to be gluten-free actually contain small amounts of gluten, making it difficult to maintain a truly gluten-free diet. Gluten is made up of glutenin and gliadin proteins. Gliadin is only partially digested in the small intestine and the resulting peptides are responsible for the inflammation and intestinal tissue damage in people with celiac disease. Because probiotic bacteria have been shown to digest gluten proteins to harmless peptides, supplementation with probiotics may be beneficial for people with celiac disease. To begin testing this hypothesis, researchers in Finland added probiotic bacteria to cultures of intestinal epithelial cells (cells that line the intestine) to determine their effect on gliadin-induced cellular damage. Gliadin-induced damage to intestinal epithelial cells includes increased permeability of the epithelial layer, alteration of tight junctions between cells (which controls the passage of materials across the intestinal wall), and structural changes such as “ruffling” of the cell edges. Two probiotic bacterial species were evaluated: Lactobacillus fermentum and Bifidobacterium lactis. In this study, B. lactis was able to inhibit permeability caused by gliadin. Additionally, both B. lactis and L. fermentum were able to protect against cell ruffling and alterations in tight junctions. The bacteria alone (without gliadin) did not cause any significant changes to the intestinal epithelial cells. Researchers concluded that Bifidobacterium lactis may be a useful addition to a gluten-free diet. Supplementation with this probiotic appears to be able to reduce the damage caused by eating gluten-contaminated foods and may even accelerate healing after initiating a gluten-free diet. It is important to note the researchers do not suggest that supplementation with probiotics could take the place of a gluten-free diet in the treatment of celiac disease. Lindfors et al. Live probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis bacteria inhibit the toxic effects induced by wheat gliadin in epithelial cell culture - Clin Exp Immunol. 2008 Apr 16.
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