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Found 6 results

  1. Dr. Vikki Petersen D.C, C.C.N

    Is Gluten Causing You Numbness or "Pins and Needles"?

    Celiac.com 12/06/2016 - Neurological problems are a very common effect of gluten intolerance. Whether you have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, there is research showing that gluten can cause nervous system problems in affected individuals. What kind of problems? When it comes to the nervous system, symptoms run the gamut from depression to schizophrenia, from migraines to brain fog, and from seizures to numbness and pain. I want to share more information with you about a particular type of nervous system ailment called peripheral neuropathy. The name basically means damage to the nerves of the extremities (arms and legs) that typically manifests in numbness and pins and needles-type pain that all of us have experienced at one time or another if we sat on our feet too long or fell asleep in a weird position and had a hand ‘go to sleep'. While these latter type incidents are normal, having such symptoms occur when no pressure is being put on the nerve is abnormal. Not only is it uncomfortable to have such sensations, but when truly numb, accidents from tripping or burning oneself can occur due to not having adequate sensation. I think it is interesting to note that the most common occurrence of peripheral neuropathy is seen in type I diabetes, an autoimmune disease. Celiac is also an autoimmune disease and according to the University of Chicago's Center for Peripheral Neuropathy, 10% of those diagnosed with celiac disease have a neurological problem, and peripheral neuropathy is quite common. Taking it a step further, we know that gluten creates a leaky gut and we know that a leaky gut is associated with autoimmune disease, through several wonderful studies brought to us by Dr. Alessio Fasano and his team. Therefore, seeing a connection between gluten and peripheral neuropathy is not unexpected based on research. Further, despite a dearth, or scarcity, of research on gluten sensitivity, doctors currently engaged in such research cite peripheral neuropathy as one of the most common symptoms associated with gluten sensitivity. In fact neurological symptoms are frequently associated with gluten sensitivity before any digestive symptoms ever develop. And in some cases, the nervous system disorders are present with no digestive disturbances. A lack of any digestive symptoms is perhaps one of many reasons why these individuals' gluten sensitivity is missed by their doctors. When it comes to comparing gluten sensitivity to celiac disease, according to Dr Fasano, 30% of the patients he diagnoses with gluten sensitivity suffer a neurological ailment, a much higher percentage than that associated with celiac disease. How Do You Know if You Have Peripheral Neuropathy? The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are numbness, a feeling of hot/cold or a pins and needles feeling that tends to start at the ends of your body's long nerves, meaning your feet and hands, before moving upwards. The symptoms can be in legs and/or arms, right side and/or left. Certainly, considering that type 1 diabetes is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy, with an estimated 50% suffering some type of nerve damage, that would be the first thing to rule out. What Should You Do? If you have these symptoms and your doctor has ruled out diabetes and any other obvious sources of the problem (including any drugs you may be taking that create neuropathy as side effects), you may fit into the category of "idiopathic neuropathy". This means that you have the problem but the reason is unknown. Or is it? Let's look at the result of a study where researchers worked with more than 200 individuals with neuropathy, 140 of whom fell within the ‘idiopathic' category. These smart doctors tested those 140 people for antibodies to gluten, specifically utilizing the anti-gliadin antibody test – AGA-IgA and AGA-IgG. This blood test is a general blood test that is not specific to celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, but shows that the body's immune system is reacting negatively to these proteins in gluten called gliadin. Of those tested, 34% were positive to one or both tests, compared to 12% of the general population. Interestingly, a full 9% of those tested in the ‘idiopathic' group actually had celiac disease, compared to 1% of the general population. And perhaps even more interesting, 80% of that same idiopathic group had the genes for celiac disease, either HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8. 80%!! In the normal population that number is about 40%. Our takeaway message is that peripheral neuropathy has a rather high correlation to immune reaction to gluten – be it celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. Therefore anyone you know who suffers with such symptoms absolutely should be checked for gluten intolerance. Regaining one's strength and correcting nervous system abnormalities is well worth the change in diet when gluten is the cause. Such cases have been described in the literature where the only treatment that led to success was a gluten-free diet. So many diseases and symptoms can be prevented and reversed by discovering their true underlying root cause and for many of those ailments it is gluten that is the culprit. Don't continue suffering nor let you friends and family members suffer. Find out why the symptom is there rather than just masking it with a drug. If you need assistance, consider calling us for a free health analysis – call 408-733-0400. Our destination clinic treats patients from across the country and internationally. You don't need to live local to us to receive assistance. We are here to help! To your good health, References: Hadjivassiliou M. et al. Neuropathy associated with gluten sensitivity. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry. 2006 Nov;77(11):1262-6. Rigamonti A. et al. Celiac disease presenting with motor neuropathy: effect of gluten-free diet. Muscle & Nerve. 2007 May;35(5):675-7. University of Chicago Center for Peripheral Neuropathy. Types of Peripheral Neuropathy - Inflammatory - Celiac Disease.
  2. George Macdonald

    Puberty

    Hi! My name is George. I am 13 years of age and I am struggling with a problem. I was diagnosed with celiac about 6 months ago after having stomachs and short stature. I love this new diet now that I am starting to develop muscles. The good things end there. I hate seeing all my friends eat sandwiches, cake, cookies, pizza etc. I also have been dealing with delayed puberty. Is this linked with celiac? Should I tell my parents? Should I see an endocrinologist? Please help me. -George P.S. An adult didn't write this I am just very educated.
  3. Celiac.com 02/08/2016 - When doctors talk about non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), they are usually talking about people who have gastrointestinal symptoms without enteropathy, and for whom a gluten-free diet (GFD) provides some relief of symptoms. However, doctors don't currently know very much about the pathophysiology of NCGS, its connection to neurological manifestations, or if it is in any way different from the manifestations seen in patients celiac disease. To address this issue, a team of researchers recently set out to take a closer look at the clinical and immunological characteristics of patients presenting with neurological manifestations with celiac disease and those with NCGS. The research team included Marios Hadjivassiliou, Dasappaiah G Rao, Richard A Grìnewald, Daniel P Aeschlimann, Ptolemaios G Sarrigiannis, Nigel Hoggard, Pascale Aeschlimann, Peter D Mooney and David S Sanders. The team compared clinical, neurophysiological, and imaging data from celiac disease patients and NCGS patients who presented with neurological dysfunction, and who had regular assessment and follow up over a 20-year period. The study included 562 out of total 700 patients. The team excluded patients who had no bowel biopsy to confirm celiac disease, no HLA type available, and/or failed to adhere to GFD. All patients presented with neurological dysfunction and had circulating anti-gliadin antibodies. The most common neurological problems were cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, and encephalopathy. Out of 562 patients, 228 (41%) had evidence of enteropathy (Group 1, celiac disease) and 334 (59%) did not (Group 2, NCGS). There was a greater proportion of patients with encephalopathy in Group 1 and with a greater proportion of neuropathy in Group 2. The severity of ataxia was about the same between the two groups. Patients in Group 1 showed more severe neuropathy. Patients from both groups responded well to a gluten-free diet. Anti-tissue transglutaminase (TG2) antibodies were found in 91% of patients in Group 1 and in 29% of patients in Group 2. Researchers saw no difference between those patients in Group 2 with HLA-DQ2/DQ8 and those without, or between those with positive TG2 compared to those with negative TG2 antibodies. Both groups showed similar serological positivity for TG6 antibodies, at 67% and 60%, respectively. The results of this study show that patients with celiac disease and NCGS have similar neurological manifestations, which respond well to a gluten-free diet. This suggests that the two conditions share common pathophysiological mechanisms. Source: The American Journal of Gastroenterology , (2 February 2016). doi:10.1038/ajg.2015.434
  4. Celiac.com 06/05/2015 - For anyone with celiac disease, following a lifelong gluten-free diet has been shown to relieve symptoms, and in celiac patients it has been shown to normalize serologic markers of celiac disease, and to restore damaged intestinal villi. Not following a gluten-free diet, on the other hand, can result in serious complications associated with malabsorption. When celiac disease goes untreated, when people who have celiac disease refuse to follow a gluten-free diet, chronic gluten-related inflammation and damage impairs absorption of nutrients, and likely causes malabsorption of oral medications. Malabsorption resulting from damaged mucosa can lead to: Nutritional deficiencies of the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K, as well as the B vitamins, thereby diminishing the absorption of iron, calcium, and folic acid. Nutritional deficiencies can lead to: Iron-deficiency anemia refractory to oral iron supplementation, and potentially osteoporosis and osteopenia due to bone loss due to decreased calcium and vitamin D absorption. A combination of nutritional deficiencies and the damaging effects of systemwide chronic inflammation can cause: Reproductive abnormalities, such as delayed puberty, secondary amenorrhea, infertility, or decreased fertility. Adverse immune responses to gluten ingestion can trigger other common manifestations, such as: Dermatitis herpetiformis, a papulovesicular rash. Beyond that, problems can include: Fractures secondary to low bone mineral density. In some cases, untreated celiac disease can lead to intestinal malignancies such as: Intestinal T-cell lymphomas. Small-bowel adenocarcinoma. Esophageal cancer. B- and T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Rapid, proper diagnosis and effective treatment of celiac disease are crucial to preventing a cascade of related problems that can further impair diagnosis, and cause irreparable damage to patient health. Source: US Pharmacist. 2014;39(12):44-48.
  5. Celiac.com 01/17/2011 - Women with latent celiac disease, those who test positive for celiac antibodies but show normal small bowel biopsies, may develop more reproductive problems, according to a report by Indian published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology. "Women having unexplained infertility, recurrent abortions, stillbirths or intrauterine growth retardation could have subclinical celiac disease, which can be detected by serological screening tests," Dr. Ashok Kumar told Reuters Health by email. Improved diagnostic tools, and greater access to screening have led to greater meant more latent or subclinical celiac disease, says Dr. Kumar, of Maulana Azad Medical College & Lok Nayak Hospital in New Delhi. Doctors know that women with full, biopsy-proven, untreated celiac disease have more reproductive problems if they don't follow a gluten-free diet. Until now, there have been "very few studies regarding the effect of latent celiac disease on reproductive performance; the association has never before been investigated in India," say the authors. To study the effect of latent celiac disease on reproductive performance, the researchers examined 893 women. They found that a total of 104 women had undergone idiopathic recurrent abortion, 104 had unexplained stillbirth, 230 had unexplained infertility, and 150 were pregnant, but showed idiopathic intrauterine growth restriction. The remaining 305 women, with normal obstetric histories, and served as control subjects. Based on IgA tTG antibody titers, latent celiac disease was 5.43 times more common in the group with recurrent spontaneous abortion than in the control group. Rates of latent celiac disease for the group with stillbirth were 4.61 times greater than the control group. Rates for the group with intrauterine growth restriction were 7.75 times greater than control subjects, while rates for those with unexplained infertility were 4.51 higher. The researchers also found that women with positive blood screens showed higher rates of previous early births, low-weight births, and cesarean sections than did seronegative subjects. Not every study shows a clear reduction in fertility, the researchers admit, but a number do show a higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes for women with latent celiac disease. Spotting the celiac disease and treating it with a gluten free diet may reduce these associated risks. Moreover, the researchers note that "the classic presentation of diarrhea and malabsorption is now less common, and atypical and silent presentations are increasing." As a result of their findings, Dr. Kumar and his colleagues are recommending celiac disease blood screens for women with idiopathic cases of poor reproductive performance. Source: World J Gastroenterol. 2010 Dec 14;16(46):5810-4
  6. The following was written by Dr. Kalle Reichelt who is a leading celiac disease researcher at the Pediatric Research Institute in Oslo, Norway. Please direct any questions regarding this article to him at: K.L.Reichelt@rh.uio.no What most people ignore is that both peptides and trace (biologically significant amounts) amounts of proteins are taken up across the gut mucosa (1,2). Because one molecule of gluten contains at least 15 opioid sequences it is quite clear that this could cause a problem. Increased peptide excretion is found in the urine of celiacs before treatment (3) (Reichelt et al in prep). This is confirmed by a series of papers that demonstrate intact food proteins in mothers milk (4-7). A Canadian group has confirmed that gluten does change a brain enzyme and monoamine levels in cats (8). Their findings a significant even though cats are not gluten eating animals. There is increasing evidence that components from food can indeed cause serious psychiatric (9-12) and neurological (13-16) diseases. Even rheumatoid arthritis may have a link to food proteins (17), and it well established that stress increases gut permeability. Nobody denies the possibility of reactive depression, but there is little reason why this could not be made worse by dietary factors. Because antibodies are indeed induced by peptides it may even be so that dietary peptides by mimicry to endogenous cell surface peptide sequences, may be responsible for many autoimmune diseases (18). References: Gardner MLG (1994) Physiology of the gastrointestinal tract. Edit: LR Johnson. Raven press 3rd edit. pp 1795-1820. Husby S et al (1985) Scand J Immunol 22:83-92. Klosse JA et al (1972) Clin Chim Acta 42:409-422. Kilshaw PJ and Cant AJ (1984) Inter. Arch Allergy Appl Immunol 75:8-15. Axelsson I et al (1986) Acta paed Scand 75:702-707. Stuart CA et al (1984) Clin Allergy 14:533-535. Troncone R et al (1987) Acta paed Scand 76:453-456. Thibault L et al (1988) J Clin Biochem Nutr. 4:209-221. Hallert C et al (1982) Psychic disturbances in adult celiac disease III.Reduced central monoamine metabolism and signs of depression. Scand J Gastroenterol 17:25-28. Singh MM and Kay SR (1976) Wheat gluten as a pthogenic factor in schizophrenia. Science 191:401-402. Dohan FC and Grasberger JC (1973) relapsed schizophrenics: earlier discharge from the hospital after cereal-free, milk-free diet. Amer J Psychiat 130:685-686. Reichelt KL et al (1990) The effect of gluten free diet on glycoprotein attached urinary peptidee excretion and behaviour in schizophrenics. J Orthomol Med 5:223-239. Gobbi G et al (1992) Celiac disease, epilepsy and cerebral calcifications. The Lancet 340:439-443. Paul K-D et al (1985) EEG-Befunde Zoeliakikranken Kindern in Abh{ngigkkeit von der Ern{hrung. Z Klin Med 40:707-709. Kahn A et al (1987) Difficulty of initiating sleep associated with cows milk allergy in infants. Sleep 10:116-121. Hadjivassiliou M et al (1996) Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? The Lancet 347:369-371. Kjeldsen-Kragh J et al (1991) Controlled trial of fasting and one-year vegetarian diet in rheumatoid arthritis. The Lancet 338:899-902. Karjalainen J et al (1992) Bovine albumin peptide as a possible trigger of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. New Eng J Med 327:302-307.
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