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Found 35 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/31/2018 - Using funds from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Canada Research Chairs Program, researcher Charlene Elliott, PhD, of the Department of Communication, Media, and Film, University of Calgary recently set out to assess the nutritional quality of gluten-free products specifically marketed for children. For her assessment, Elliott bought child-targeted gluten-free food products from two major supermarket chains in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Elliott used the Pan American Health Organization Nutrient Profile Model to compare the nutritional quality of products labeled gluten-free with those not so labeled. A secondary analysis compared the nutritional profile of child-targeted gluten-free products to their non-gluten-free “equivalents.” Elliott’s analysis showed that child-targeted gluten-free products generally had lower amounts of sodium, total fat, and saturated fat, However, those same foods also had less protein and about the same amount of calories from sugar as child-targeted products without a gluten-free claim. According to the Pan American Health Organization criteria, both gluten-free products and "regular" products designed for children can be classified as having poor nutritional quality (88% vs 97%). Compared to their non-gluten-free equivalents, products with a gluten-free claim had similarly high sugar levels, (79% vs 81%). So, the big picture is that gluten-free supermarket foods targeted at children are generally less nutritious than their non-gluten-free counterparts, and both types have alarmingly high sugar content. A gluten-free label is no guarantee of healthier, more nutritious food for kids, and it’s a mistake for parents to buy gluten-free products believing they are healthier than their non-gluten-free equals. The evidence shows that is simply not true. The takeaway here seems to be that, gluten-free or not, supermarket foods aimed at children are generally poor in nutrition and loaded with sugar, and parents should choose wisely when buying food for their children. Source: Pediatrics, July 2018
  2. Celiac.com 07/10/2018 - As part of its 50th Anniversary activities, Celiac UK has launched a research fund and accompanying fundraising appeal to support new research and development. The fund has already received an injection of £500k from Innovate UK, in addition to £250k from the charity. Together, Coeliac UK and Innovate UK have opened applications for grants from the £750,000. Researchers and businesses can apply for a grants ranging from £50k to £250k for healthcare diagnostics, digital self-care tools and better gluten free food production. Food businesses can receive grants by developing more nutritious and affordable gluten free food, by using new ingredients, improving nutritional value, flavor and/or texture, and creating better methods of preservation. The three main goals of the program are: To improve celiac disease diagnostics; to improve the quality of gluten-free foods, and to promote digitally supported self-care for people with celiac disease. The matching industry funds will bring spending for new research on the growing global gluten-free foods market to nearly £1m. Ultimately, Coeliac UK is looking to raise £5 million to improve understanding and treatment of celiac disease and gluten related autoimmune conditions. Sarah Sleet, Chief Executive of Coeliac UK said: “With the global diagnosis for coeliac disease increasing year on year, this is a chance for UK business and researchers to get ahead and develop competitive advantages in innovation which will be of benefit to a badly underserved patient group. Read more at: NewFoodMagazine.com
  3. Updated list here new links, and composed in a more organized manner LOOK for * on links and you can order from them directly, at the bottom are some websites to purchase from Full Meal Options/Entrees, broad spectrum companies http://iansnaturalfoods.com/allergy-friendly-products/search-by-allergens/?tax_products_tags[]=gluten-free&wpas=1 ^Ians gluten-free options you will find sides, baked/fried snacks, onion rings, chicken strips, cheese sticks, fish sticks, pizza bread. etc from them that are good subs you can find where to buy them or even have your local grocer stock them on request. Best thing about Ians is you can go to their site and adjust the filter to find stuff free of other ingredients. http://udisglutenfree.com/product-catalog/ ^ Whole lot of food staples from this company (none safe for me) but all gluten-free alternative you can have, udi is like the cheap bargain gluten-free brand alot of there stuff seems lacking but they have a little bit of everything. From microwave dinners, pizzas, burritos, instant pasta dishes, granola's, and cookies. http://www.vansfoods.com/our-products ^ go to breakfast guys. Select Gluten free from dietary restrictions or other options you need, NOTE most products use oats. https://enjoylifefoods.com/our-foods/ ^All Free of the 8 top allergens, they have premade cookies, chips, and baking ingredients. http://www.namastefoods.com/products/cgi-bin/products.cgi?Category_Id=all ^ Free of top 8 allergens, they have everything from flours, mixes, and entrees, https://www.simplemills.com/collections/all ^Mixes, Crackers, and cookies, ALL GRAIN FREE https://knowfoods.com/collections/frontpage ^Low carb bread, muffins, waffles, cookies, etc. All low carb and keto friendly great for diabetics https://www.geefree.com/collections/all ^All gluten-free Pizza pouches, Meal bits, pastry puffs, Breads/Pizza Note some of the above spectrum companies also offer their own https://canyonglutenfree.com/buy-gluten-free-bread-products/ ^Raved by most people I talk to as some of the BEST gluten-free breads/bagels/buns available, several of my customers talk about using them with artisan nut butters all the time. https://julianbakery.com/shop/?fwp_product_categories=bread *^Grain Free Corn free low carb bread, The seed bread toast just like gluten breads, The almond and coconut each have their own niche. Bread is best used toasted, PS the coconut bread makes awesome french toast https://cappellos.com/collections/pizza *^Grain Free Pizza crust to make your own with using eggs, coconut and arrowroot for a base crust blend. The Naked pizza crust is dairy free. Order frozen by the case and they ship them to you. https://realgoodfoods.com/productpage/ *^Grain Free Pizza They use Dairy Cheese blended with chicken breast to form personal pizza crust. You can order them frozen and shipped to you. NEW PRODUCTS they do Enchiladas NOW https://www.califlourfoods.com/collections *^ This is the only one I buy, grain free, low carb crust, and the plant based one is great, NOTE these make a New york style flat crust, I use 15 min prebake before adding toppings to make them extra crispy http://glutenfreedelights.com/our-sandwiches/ ^Gluten free hot pockets? YES they make them for when you need the old instant hotpocket, odd craving but I know they hit sometimes. CRUST MIXES Grain free https://www.simplemills.com/collections/all/products/almond-flour-pizza-crust-mix https://julianbakery.com/product/paleo-pizza-crust-mix-gluten-grain-free/ Baking Mixes https://julianbakery.com/shop/?fwp_product_categories=mixes\ *^Grain Free low carb mixes have pancakes, bread, pizzia https://www.simplemills.com/collections/almond-flour-baking-mixes ^Grain Free Mixes http://www.bobsredmill.com/shop/gluten-free/gluten-free-mixes.html ^Major Staple provider of baking mixes and flours for the gluten free https://www.bettycrocker.com/products/gluten-free-baking-mix ^Your old Favorites, note these are loaded with starches and can cause some issues (Note a specialty gluten-free company) http://www.kingarthurflour.com/products/gluten-free-mixes/ ^More classic starchy mixes (Note a specialty Gluten Free company) Chocolate https://phikind.com/collections/all ^Gluten Free, Dairy Free, and Sugar Free Truffles! https://www.lakanto.com/collections/sales-title/products/box-of-lakanto-sugar-free-55-chocolate-bar ^Gluten Free, Sugar Free, Dairy Free, Soy Free bars OMG better then a Hershey bar https://www.lindtusa.com/gluten-free-chocolate--sc4?utm_source=eean&utm_medium=affiliate_loyalty&utm_campaign=lindtaffiliate#facet:&productBeginIndex:0&facetLimit:&orderBy:&pageView:grid&minPrice:&maxPrice:&pageSize:& ^Various gluten free truffles, and chocolate bars http://lilyssweets.com/ ^Chocolate Bars, Baking Chips etc. all gluten, dairy, and sugar free. Might contain Dairy in some and soy Bars https://julianbakery.com/shop/?fwp_product_categories=protein-bar&fwp_per_page=100 ^High protein low carb, meal bars, take some getting used to with the texture but great for diabetics and those sensitive to sugars. https://www.kindsnacks.com/products/kind-nut-bars ^Good nut bars and snacks they also make granola https://theglutenfreebar.com/ ^Gluten free food bars, contain oats in many. https://enjoylifefoods.com/our-foods/grain-seed-bars/ ^Allergen Free Bars Snacks/Chips/Crackers/Wraps https://www.mygerbs.com/ *^They have pumpkin seeds, hemp seeds, sunflower seeds, granola, etc. all free of the top 8 allergens, Also they offer various spices, etc. https://eatprotes.com/products/protes-protein-chips?variant=24971155656 *^Grain free low carb, vegan protein chips, bit of a acquired taste http://beanitos.com/#snacks ^Corn free tortilla chips, taste like a high end restaurant chips, they also make corn free puff snacks. http://www.beanfieldssnacks.com/ ^More Corn free tortilla chips note these also have vegan options, they are a bit lighter and crispier. http://www.lundberg.com/products/snacks/ ^Rice and Quinoa Chips, crackers, etc. https://sietefoods.com/collections/tortilla-chips *^Cassava based chips grain free bit high in starch but light and crisp https://sietefoods.com/collections/tortillas *^Cassava based grain free tortillas http://www.nucoconut.com/coconut-wraps/ *^Coconut wraps, I love to use these, you have to warm them up a bit to make them pliable. https://www.bluediamond.com/brand/nut-thins ^Almond based crackers https://bakeryonmain.com/shop/ ^Oat based granola snacks, bars, etc. https://www.wildwayoflife.com/ ^Gluten free, Grain Free, Hot Cereal, granola and smoothie bases https://www.goraw.com/shop/sprouted-flax-snax/ ^These flax crackers are great...the pizza is addicting Fries/Hashbrowns/Tatertots http://www.oreida.com/en/Products/Categories/French-Fries http://www.oreida.com/en/Products/Categories/Hash-Browns http://www.oreida.com/en/Products/Categories/Tater-Tots ^Go to company for most of is with this disease, NOTE most other companies will use wheat flour in fries/tots/hashbrowns http://iansnaturalfoods.com/products/organic-crispy-potato-puffs/ Cooking Ingredients/Rice/Flours/Condiments https://www.pacificfoods.com/broths-and-stocks ^Many of use this brand in our cooking https://www.spicely.com/collections/organic-spices-seasoning *^Gluten free, Organic, Non GMO spices #1 go to for safe spices for many of us http://www.lundberg.com/products/ ^Great and safe Gluten Free Rice company, they make many instant rice entrees, rice crackers, and rice cakes http://www.lotusfoods.com/#products ^Another option for various rice products https://cappellos.com/collections/pasta ^Grain Free FRESH soft pasta options EXPENSIVE but some of the highest end stuff you can get http://www.glutenfreeoats.com/ *^ONLY true Gluten free oat company that I would trust, it is owned by a celiac family https://miraclenoodle.com/collections/miracle-noodle-rice-products *^Carb Free/Low Carb, Grain free noodles, rice, and instant meal kits. https://www.waldenfarms.com/ ^Gluten Free, Sugar Free, Carb Free. Dairy Free, Soy Free for cravings when you can't have them, bit overly processed but helps out when your limited They have coffee creamers, topping syrups, dessert dips, savory dips, salad dressings, condiments etc. CAREFUL if you have issues with highly processed foods and xantham gum http://natureshollow.com/index.html ^Sugar Free jams, honey, and maple syrup using xylitol for a sweetener instead of of a bunch of crud. Stuff takes awhile for your gut to adjust to but honestly They have the only Honey I can use http://www.polanerspreads.com/polaner-products/ ^ All their products are gluten-free and their jams are good I love using their sugar free products with fiber, I also use some of smuckers SF products https://www.coconutsecret.com/products2.html ^gluten-free and soy free teriyaki sauces, soy sauce subs, garlic sauce, cooking sauces, and they make knock off granola bars without oats http://sirkensingtons.com/products ^Great source for mayo, vegan mayo, mustard, ketchup, and SECRET SAUCE. all gluten and corn free with NO artificial preservatives, My main condiment when cooking for others, as a chef I trust it quite a bit. http://www.nucoconut.com/products/coconut-vinegar/ ^These are vinegar made from coconut, great for cooking with and over salads http://www.eatparma.com/store ^Awesome Vegan Parmesan options the bacon one is a GOD SEND https://www.nutilight.com/ ^OMG You need to try this, dairy free, and sugar free Nutella substitute Meat/Meat Alternatives http://beyondmeat.com/products ^ Meat alternative using Pea Protein, I love the beefy crumbles as they have the texture and flavor of ground beef. Low carb and good for ketogenic diets. MUCH easier to digest then actual beef while having the same amount of protein and less fat. https://www.jennieo.com/products ^look for the gluten-free label, you can get all kinds of sausage, bacon, burger patties etc from them all from turkey. I like using the bacon and sausages for soup stocks, and seasoning myself https://skinnygirllunchmeat.com/ ^Love the deli meats from this company I use them in my catering sometimes https://www.mccormick.com/thai-kitchen/products ^I love using the curry paste from the Thai Kitchen, Noodle kits, Soup kits, stir fry kits, even Chinese take out kits. some even instant microwaveable. All gluten-free from what I have found gluten-free Thai/Chinese food. http://new.organicvillefoods.com/category/products/ *^gluten-free sauces like sriracha, BBQ, mustard, ketchup, ect. Good line up of products. http://www.authenticfoods.com/ *^Great source for flours, baking ingredients etc. all you basics https://store.nutiva.com/coconut-flour/ ^Coconut flour, I use this brand in my baking alot Dairy Free Alternatives to Dairy Foods https://www.bluediamond.com/brand/almond-breeze ^ Almond, cashew, coconut, blends etc. https://silk.com/products ^ More Almond, cashew, coconut, blends, they also offer yogurt and icecream alternatives. http://sodeliciousdairyfree.com/products ^ They offer many coconut options, Yogurt, cheese, milks, icecream pints, icecream bars. http://malkorganics.com/products/ ^VERY high end minimally processed almond milk, one the the best https://www.ripplefoods.com/products/ ^ NUT FREE, Dairy Free options of a rich milk alternative from yellow peas (legumes) http://goodkarmafoods.com/products/ ^Flax Based milk alternatives http://www.leafcuisine.com/raw-vegan-food-dairy-free-probiotic-cashew-spreads/ ^ BEST and least processed cheese spreads, cream cheese etc. I can eat these without any issues https://daiyafoods.com/ ^Offers Vegan cheese slices, cheese blocks, cheese shreds, pizza, CHEESE CAKES!, yogurt, s https://followyourheart.com/products/ ^ Diary free and vegan, cheese, spreads, dips, dressings, condiments https://winkfrozendesserts.com/collections/wink-frozen-desserts-pints *^ICE CREAM by the pint AND THEY SHIP IT TO YOU, Dairy free, soy free, sugar free, PERFECT bliss I suggest getting the gluten free pastry pack Flavors/Extracts https://www.capellaflavors.com/13ml ^Great flavors for any dessert you might desire, you add 1 drop to each oz of liquid base in smoothies, icecream, and drinks....great way to kick cravings, Needs Sweeteners http://www.lorannoils.com/1-ounce-larger-sizes ^Baking Extracts Coffee/Tea https://www.christopherbean.com/collections/flavored-coffee *^ DESERT Flavored Coffee all gluten-free and safe, I called the company and even tested most of the coffee flavors myself using testing kits. Sounded too good to be true but most of these taste dead on like the deserts they are supposed to , just add sweetener. Also try their plain coffee http://www.republicoftea.com/ *^Great tea company, all gluten-free certified teas, both bulk and bags. Hard Ciders/Liqours While Most Hard Liqours are gluten free due to the distilling process these are ones I have contacted the company on. https://austineastciders.com/ ^Local cider here in Texas, I keep these for guest, good alternative to the "Beer Can Chicken" http://www.acecider.com/ ^Suggested by someone else I was talking to https://www.captainmorgan.com/ ^Old Staple for many and company says they are gluten free http://admiralnelsonsrum.com/ ^I use this in cooking, goes great finishing off veggie saute http://www.titosvodka.com/ ^Corn Based Vodka https://www.ciroc.com/ ^Grape Based Vodka EMERGENCY MEAL Supplies for long term survival http://www.glutenfreeemergencykits.com/gluten-free-emergency-kits-1/ ^All gluten free meal options dedicated company https://www.wisefoodstorage.com/emergency-food-kits-supplies/gluten-free-food-storage.html ^Gluten Free Options from a Wise company http://www.thrivelife.com/all-products/thrive-foods-161/gluten-free.html ^Various Freeze Dried foods, great for not just emergency foods but the dehydrated veggies give options for soups and always having veggies in stock without refrigeration. Places to order From Check these for most the the above products, these are the best pricing options, Always cross check and look for sells. https://www.luckyvitamin.com ^Really good place for supplements, protein powders, and some gluten-free foods and snacks, Cross check with amazon for best pricing and sometimes Luckys will price match. http://thrv.me/gf25 ^Thrive Market, like a online grocery store that ship to you so you do not need to go out and buy stuff, has alot of brands just search under Gluten Free. https://www.amazon.com/ ^The go to everything store. Found a UPC list from Several Grocery stores, you can takes these to your local grocery store manager and have items ordered. https://www.heb.com/static/pdfs/Gluten-Free-List.pdf ^HEB/Central Market http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/service/gluten-free-products-list ^Whole Foods select location and store and you can even see what they have in stock. https://www.kroger.com/asset/541b1c6a84ae4e0350fcace0?data=1 ^ Kroger http://www.traderjoes.com/PDF/tjs-gluten-free-dietary-list.pdf ^Trader Joes
  4. Celiac.com 07/17/2017 - What are the main challenges in developing good gluten-free foods? With the explosion of gluten-free products, food manufacturers have worked to master the challenges of formulating gluten-free products that are both tasty and nutritious. This effort has paid dividends in the last years is due, in part, to advances in formulation, ingredient sourcing, and a focus on making products delicious. Driven in part by a desire by manufacturers to make products that are not just safe and reliable for people with food allergies, an entire product category that was once marginalized to the special diet aisle, lacking in flavor, texture and nutrition, has crossed into the mainstream. More and more, food companies are working to create products that are not just free of the common allergens and artificial substances, but products that are nutritious and delicious in their own right. Still, challenges remain. A recent article in Food Processing highlights some of the challenges faced by manufacturers of gluten-free products. Some of those challenges are: Formulation Challenges In most cases, there are still challenges developing free-from foods, although not as many as in the past. Though much progress has been made on formulation gluten-free products, challenges still remain. In fact, formulation challenges are at the top of the list for things manufacturers must resolve in order to make tasty, delicious gluten-free products. "Wheat flour has many functional attributes that are difficult to replace, as well as a very clean flavor profile," points out Peggy Dantuma, director of technical sales-bakery at Kerry Inc., in Beloit, Wisconsin. Sourcing Pure Ingredients Once upon a time, finding good sources of reliable gluten-free grains was a challenge. Now, with new product protocols, certification and the rise of specialty growers and mills, that problem is not nearly as daunting as in the past. Kasondra Shippen, general manager at Washington's Flax4Life maker of certified gluten-free flax muffins, brownies, granola and other items says she has no trouble finding good natural ingredients. Quinn Snacks of Boulder, Colorado, makes its new non-GMO pretzels gluten-free as well as free of dairy, soy and corn. It uses Kansas whole-grain sorghum flour, organic wild blossom honey, apple cider vinegar and brown rice and potato flour among its other "real" ingredients. In addition to sourcing pure ingredients, many manufacturers operate their own dedicated production facilities to ensure product purity from start to finish. Like a number of other manufacturers, Flax4Life operates a dedicated facility free of gluten, dairy and nuts. Formulating Unique Products In the early days, and to some extent today, many gluten-free products were formulated to be basic copies of existing non-gluten-free products. The result was often and inferior product that was a pale comparison to its original. More and more, manufacturers are looking to create unique products that also happen to be free of gluten and many other common allergies. Riverside Natural Foods in Ontario, Canada, "doesn't try to replicate existing products with gluten-free ingredients," says Nima Fotovat, president. Fotovat goes on to say that "[d]eveloping allergen-free product is the same process as any product. We start with the best, freshest ingredients from reliable suppliers who can offer certified allergen-free credentials, and process them minimally to preserve the original nutrients as much as possible. We conduct limited consumer testing to ensure that taste is delivered." Riverside's MadeGood Crispy Squares, and MadeGood granola bars are free from gluten and the eight common allergens. Both products are certified USDA organic and non-GMO. Making Products Delicious In looking to formulate unique products, manufacturers have embraced the concept that gluten-free foods need to taste good and to be appealing to consumers in their own right. That has led to a focus on making products taste delicious. "The most important thing is that the products must taste delicious," says Shippen of Flax4Life. Transparency and Sustainability More and more, manufacturers are embracing transparency and sustainability as a key part of their food delivery mission. Kristy Homes-Lewis, co-founder and CEO of Quinn Snacks, says that the company works "only with growers and suppliers who share our vision." That vision includes sourcing organic ingredients whenever possible and supporting other green businesses. Quinn's products are distinguished, in part by the company's use of "farm-to-bag" tracking that allows the company and its customers to track ingredients back to the source. All of Quinn Snacks products are traceable on its website, where consumers can find information on suppliers, and explanations about each ingredient. Though many challenges still face producers of gluten- and allergen-free foods, manufacturers are meeting many of them head-on and, more often than not, prevailing in the production of tasty, nutrition, gluten- and allergen-free snacks. Look for the industry to continue their efforts to make progress in all areas of food manufacture, and look for more good, high-quality products in the future. Source: Foodprocessing.com
  5. Celiac.com 07/10/2017 - For anyone with celiac disease or gluten intolerance who was wondering how well food manufacturers are complying with FDA standard for gluten-free labeling, or wondering exactly how gluten-free is my gluten-free food, some early answers are in, and the news looks good. A recent report by the agency indicates that the vast majority of food manufacturers are getting it right, and, correcting where they do get it wrong. The FDA's final rule for compliance in gluten-free labeling was August 5, 2014. To gauge compliance in gluten-free food labeling, the agency conducted a sampling assignment of products labeled "gluten free" from July 2015 to August 2016. The compliance testing is an important part of the FDA's mission to ensure that products labeled on or after the compliance date are properly labeled as "gluten-free." In all, the agency's team analyzed more than 250 types of products, and tested 702 individual samples in the categories of cereals, grain bars, and flours. Their complete survey showed that just five samples from one product source contained gluten in excess of the regulatory limit of 20 parts per million (ppm). That left the overall gluten-free product-based compliance rate above 99.5 percent. The good news here is that producers major gluten-free food products are doing a very good job of following FDA labeling standards. Also, the manufacturer of the samples that showed gluten levels above 20 ppm carried out a voluntary recall, conducted an extensive root cause analysis, and immediately implemented additional corrective actions to prevent recurrence. Follow-up testing by the FDA showed acceptable levels of gluten. This is the first hard data the FDA has gathered regarding compliance with gluten-free labeling standards. To see such high levels of compliance and responsiveness by manufacturers is encouraging. Read the Analytical Results of FY2015/16 Gluten-Free Food Product Sampling. SOURCE: FDA.gov
  6. Celiac.com 03/23/2017 - Allergens in processed foods can be a significant problem in the confectionery industry. In the European Union, current estimates suggest that 17 million people suffer from food allergies and in recent years, the number of children under five years with significant food allergies has grown. Therefore, it is important to keep track of information and raise awareness among consumers and producers. It should also be noted that all the tragic events and unpleasant incidents related to food and quality level affect the economy of the entire food industry, not just one company. Managing food allergens is a first step in limiting these problems. Since the term allergy is often misused it must be distinguished from food intolerance. The consequences related to these two conditions are very different. Intolerance is rarely life-threatening. People with a food intolerance can usually eat small amounts of problematic foods without adversely affecting their health. Food intolerance can be caused by metabolic disorders such as lactose intolerance. People with food allergies may react strongly even to trace amounts of allergenic ingredients (with respect to foods to which they are allergic) present in food. They cannot tolerate even very small amounts of allergens in their diet, with the risk that allergens can cause serious reactions and even death. Below we present fragment of a list of allergens form REGULATION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL No. 1169/2011 of 25 October 2011 on the provision of information to consumers about food. For more complete information, please refer to the original text of the regulation. List of allergens under REGULATION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL (EU) No 1169/2011 of 25 October 2011: Cereals containing gluten, Crustaceans and products thereof, Eggs and products thereof, Fish and products thereof, Groundnuts (peanuts) and derived products, Soybeans and products thereof, Milk and products thereof (including lactose) Nuts, such as almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts, cashews, pecans, Brazil nuts, pistachios / pistachios, macadamia nuts and Queensland nuts and derivative products Celery and products thereof, Mustard and products thereof, Sesame seeds and products thereof, Sulphur dioxide and sulphites Lupin and products thereof, Mollusks and products thereof. Confectionery may include many ingredients from this list of allergens. The best way to treat allergies is to avoid the banned products. From the manufacturer's point of view it is important to ensure correct labeling of their own products. It is worth paying attention to this information because allergic customers and their care-givers read this information carefully and require precise administration and declaration of these allergens. Once they trust the brand they are likely to be loyal. Companies should therefore take steps to ensure that the ingredients are carefully and thoroughly listed. A risk factor which is worth noting is unintentional cross-contamination where a minimum amount of an allergen can be transferred during the process of manufacturing a product that is otherwise completely free of allergens. Producers should do everything possible to keep allergenic products and ingredients out of those products for which they are not intended. Cross contamination or inadvertent introduction of allergens into the product is generally the result of exposure of the product during processing or handling. Cross contamination is when there are many kinds of products produced on the same production line, re-processing, or due to ineffective cleaning or preparations containing dust from allergens. Although some phenomena cannot always be prevented, by developing and implementing controls to reduce contact between allergens and other products, consumer safety and trust can be enhanced. One of the tools to help in the control of allergens is an integrated quality management system which includes an inspection for all allergens. An allergen Management Plan is a key element of efforts to ensure a safe product. This plan is a written document that lists the storage, handling, processing, packaging, and identification of allergenic foods and ingredients. But this is not a one-time effort. An allergen control plan must be implemented, enforced and audited and constantly updated. Every time you make a change in the manufacturing process or a product, you must evaluate your plan and, where necessary, update it. Of course every employee is an important part of the plan, and everyone must understand their role and the responsibilities they bear. Raising awareness among the employees in this area, through training, should also be documented. The plan must also take into account the cooperation with suppliers of raw materials. Not all of the recommendations of the quality control system may be used in any food processing plant. Despite this, consider any threat and determine the extent to which it may affect a business and its suppliers. And have procedures in place for allergen control. The risk assessment should be conducted in order to develop a plan for the control of allergens. The assessment should start with raw materials, their storage, each stage of production, packaging and labeling of the finished product. It should define the critical points where allergens may be introduced into the product and establish a system for monitoring these points to avoid unintentional cross contamination. This plan is part of health care, the acquisition and maintenance of consumer confidence, and also provides financial protection and preserves the manufacturer's reputation. Product labeling should assist consumers who have allergies or intolerances by providing them with more comprehensive information on the composition of the food they buy. Caution in the labeling of allergens is a voluntary warning to consumers added to the list of ingredients (eg. it may contain milk). When should we use labels informing about the possibility of allergens? In order to warn consumers about trace amounts of allergens we should use them only when it has been found that occasional contamination of the product cannot be avoided. This decision should be based on a thorough evaluation process and allergen control plan, if it is determined that unintentional cross-contamination cannot be eliminated by careful labeling of allergens. Caution in the labeling of products that may contain allergens can never be used as a substitute for good manufacturing practices or an allergen control plan.
  7. Pop Sugar published an article today called "Please Stop Asking For Organic and Gluten-Free Makeup." The link is below. The author claims that people with Celiac do not need gluten-free makeup unless, in her words, "you intend to drink your foundation." What do you think of articles like this? https://www.popsugar.com/beauty/Why-You-Dont-Want-Organic-Makeup-43262535#comments
  8. Celiac.com 01/18/2017 - Irish food manufacturer Largo, whose snack products include Tayto, has admitted it sold crisps contaminated with high amounts of gluten in a packages that were labeled "Gluten Free." The company has pleaded guilty to breaching food safety regulations. After buying a package of O'Donnell's mature Irish cheese and onion, gluten-free crisps for her 10-year-old son, a mother from Arklow, County Wicklow, reportedly noticed a reaction to the crisps when his ears began turning red. The mother complained to the company and the HSE subsequently brought a criminal case against the food manufacturer. Calling the case a "very serious matter," Judge Grainne Malone noted that the maximum penalty on indictment in the cases at the circuit court was a €500,000 fine and/or three years in prison. However, the judge agreed to the jurisdiction of the district court in the case. Giving evidence, HSE environmental health officer Caitriona Sheridan said that products to be labeled gluten-free were required to contain less than 20 parts-per-milligram gluten. The crisps targeted by the complaint tested at more than 700 ppm gluten. Lab tests on a second control sample of the product showed more than 100 ppm of gluten. Two other people have since filed complaints about high gluten in Largo's gluten-free products. The company responded by withdrawing two pallets of the products, which it said contained the incorrect crisps. Counsel for the company, Andrew Whelan, told the court the issue was identified as a malfunction in the line, and that Largo will now package gluten-fee products in a "totally segregated" production area. Read more at Barfblog.com,
  9. Scand J Gastroenterol 1999 Feb;34(2):163-9 Kaukinen K, Collin P, Holm K, Rantala I, Vuolteenaho N, Reunala T, Maki M Dept. of Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, Finland. BACKGROUND: We investigated whether wheat starch-based gluten-free products are safe in the treatment of gluten intolerance. METHODS: The study involved 41 children and adults with coeliac disease and 11 adults with dermatitis herpetiformis adhering to a gluten-free diet for 8 years on average. Thirty-five newly diagnosed coeliac patients at diagnosis and 6 to 24 months after the start of a gluten-free diet and 27 non-coeliac patients with dyspepsia were investigated for comparison. Daily dietary gluten and wheat starch intake were calculated. Small bowel mucosal villous architecture, CD3+, alphabeta+, and gammadelta+ intraepithelial lymphocytes, mucosal HLA-DR expression, and serum endomysial, reticulin, and gliadin antibodies were investigated. RESULTS: Forty of 52 long-term-treated patients adhered to a strict wheat starch-based diet and 6 to a strict naturally gluten-free diet; 6 patients had dietary lapses. In the 46 patients on a strict diet the villous architecture, enterocyte height, and density of alphabeta+ intraepithelial lymphocytes were similar to those in non-coeliac subjects and better than in short-term-treated coeliac patients. The density of gammadelta(+)cells was higher, but they seemed to decrease over time with the gluten-free diet. Wheat starch-based gluten-free flour products did not cause aberrant up-regulation of mucosal HLA-DR. The mucosal integrity was not dependent on the daily intake of wheat starch in all patients on a strict diet, whereas two of the six patients with dietary lapses had villous atrophy and positive serology. CONCLUSION: Wheat starch-based gluten-free flour products were not harmful in the treatment of coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis.
  10. Celiac.com 08/03/2016 - As part of its mission, Gluten Free Watchdog performs gluten testing on gluten-free products and shares that information with the gluten-free community. They've tested many gluten-free products over the years, and collected data from their efforts. Over the past five years, Gluten Free Watchdog has been testing oat products labeled gluten-free that list oats as the first or second ingredient. In all, they've done professional testing on thirty-five different commercial products. They've recently released their findings, and while they don't name any names, they do offer some good general insight into gluten-contamination levels in general. All testing for Gluten Free Watchdog was conducted by Bia Diagnostics, LLC using the sandwich R5 ELISA (Ridascreen Gliadin R7001) and cocktail extraction—Mendez method. Based on testing data from Gluten Free Watchdog, oat products labeled gluten-free have an almost three times higher risk of gluten contamination as compared to labeled gluten-free foods as a whole. The results showed 28 of 35 or 80% of oat products testing below 5 parts per million of gluten, and 2 of 35 or 6% of oat products testing at or above 5 ppm but below 20 ppm of gluten. Meanwhile, 5 of 35 or 14% of oat products tested at or above 20 ppm of gluten. The good news, of course, is that 86% percent oat products tested below 20 parts per million of gluten, but that's not nearly as good as the 95% of all gluten-free foods tested to date that have tested below 20 ppm of gluten. So, the bad news is that the 14% of oat products testing at or above 20 ppm of gluten is nearly three times higher than for gluten-free foods in general. Main culprits testing at or above 20 ppm of gluten included "gluten-free" labeled oat breadcrumbs, rolled oats, granola, hot oat cereal, and granola. Gluten Free Watchdog's main recommendation for consumers is to know the source of the oats you are eating, and to make sure you're getting your oats form a safe and trustworthy source. If you have a concern, check with the manufacturer to make sure they source ALL oats from a supplier of purity protocol oats, such as gluten-free Harvest, Avena, Montana Gluten-Free. Read more at Gluten-free Watchdog.org.
  11. Very few celiacs are likely to have any reaction to topical gluten contact. In order for a gut reaction to occur, it is likely that direct contact with the gut lumen is required. Many people with celiac disease have everyday contact with gluten (for instance, bakers with celiac disease who have contact everyday with wheat flour), and do not have any reaction to it. However, there are, on rare occasion, people who have had an anaphylactoid response to gluten, and these people should avoid gluten in all forms. Also, topical gluten breathed into the upper airways may cause symptoms of allergic rhetinitis in rare instances. If there is a simple alternative to a shampoo, cosmetic, etc., you may want to use the non gluten containing product.
  12. Is it necessary to use gluten-free shampoo, hand lotion, etc? I got rid of all of my lipstick and chapstick and went gluten free on lip products when I was diagnosed in December, but now I am thinking that maybe I should also think about replacing some of my other products, like shampoo and hand lotion, maybe face lotion and other makeup. I don't eat my shampoo or hand lotion in the same way I may accidentally ingest lip care products, but the more I think about it the more I think maybe I would be better off going gluten free on these also. What are your opinions on this?
  13. Celiac.com 01/06/2016 - Quaker Oats is launching new, gluten-free versions of several products, including 18 oz. Quaker Quick 1-Minute Oats and Quaker Instant Oatmeal in both 10-count Original and 8-count Maple & Brown Sugar flavors. All Quaker Gluten Free Oats meet the 20 PPM standard set by the FDA. The announcement is good news for fans of gluten-free foods, and great news for people with celiac disease who find oats to be a healthy part of a gluten-free diet. One thing to remember is that most people tolerate oats just fine, but if you’re not used to eating high fiber foods, you may want to start slow and see how your body adjusts to oats in your diet. Also, about 8-10% of people with celiac disease also seem to have a sensitivity to oats. If you are one of these people, oat products, even gluten-free, might not be right for you, so monitor the situation and do what’s right for you. For everyone else, gluten-free oats offer a great way to get healthy fiber into the diet, and Quaker’s ready availability makes that decision even easier. Are you excited about gluten-free Quaker Oats products?
  14. Celiac.com 12/18/2015 - Flour is a major global business, and flours of all kinds constitute a major part of the growing global food industry. Global flour markets are directly impacted by the growing processed food industry. Recent years have seen a notable expansion of the global flour market in terms of increased global demand and production capacity. Fueled by changing customer preference, increased health concerns related to high-protein flours, rising urbanization, and per-capita income of the global population, Transparency Market Research expects the global flour market, valued at USD 182.66 billion in 2013, to reach 183,100.0 kilo tons in the next five years, growing at a CAGR of 3.8% to top USD 245.82 billion by 2020. One of the big drivers of flour market growth is the rise in consumption of bread and bakery products and ready-to-eat (RTE) products in developing economies. Also, rising health concerns over high-protein flour provides an opportunity for flour millers to promote gluten-free, and low-protein variants of flours. The market for gluten-free products includes products such as breakfast cereals, gluten-free flour, snacks, and bakery products, among others. Considering that the demand for gluten-free variants of flour such as corn flour, soya flour, maize flour and rice flour is significant in the global market, analysts are projecting a strong rise in the popularity of gluten-free foods in the 2014-2020 forecast period. Browse Market Research Report of Flour Market.
  15. Celiac.com 11/12/2015 - The gluten-free products market is growing rapidly in areas that traditionally see a good deal of wheat consumption. The European market for gluten-free products is set to see the highest growth, with a projected a CAGR of 10.4%, reaching $7.59 billion in 2020. Until recently, North America was the largest growing market, followed by the European market. The use of corn, rice, quinoa, and sorghum ingredients is set to expand greatly, especially in soups, sauces, breads, and pizza bases, as manufacturers look to take existing product line gluten-free. Overall, baked goods made for the largest market share in 2014, and the cereals & snacks segment of the market is projected to have highest CAGR during the review period, both in terms of volume and value. Inquire for more details at rnrmarketresearch.com Read more at: PR NEWSWIRE
  16. Celiac.com 08/28/2015 - Perhaps unsurprisingly, a study of over 3,200 supermarket products finds gluten-free foods aren't a healthier choice than their non gluten-free counterparts. If you have celiac disease, or gluten sensitivity, gluten-free foods are necessary and beneficial, but the new study suggests that, nutritionally speaking, there's no evidence that they're any healthier than their gluten-containing counterparts. The research looked at 3,200 food products on Australian grocery shelves, and found little or no nutritional difference between regular foods and comparable gluten-free items. Now, that doesn't make gluten-free products unhealthy, just no better than their gluten-containing equivalents. But if you are not celiac or gluten-sensitive, then you're probably spending more money to get the same nutrition, and not getting any health benefits. Strangely, plenty of people seem to believe that sugary treats such as cakes are 'healthier' if they are gluten-free. The study compared supermarket products in 10 categories: bread, breakfast cereal, dry pasta, cereal bars, cakes, sweet biscuits, ice cream, potato chips, processed meats, and candies. The study team assessed foods using the Australian Government's Health Star Rating, which rates food by nutritional value. The rating system awards one star to the foods with the least nutritional value, and five stars to those with the most. Basically, when they crunched the numbers using the Health Star Rating, the team found no significant difference between the ratings of gluten-free foods and their regular alternatives. For me, though, the real takeaway is that there's a good amount of processed food out their, gluten-free or not, and you're likely healthier eating fresh, whole foods than anything processed. Or, alternatively, it takes a bit of effort to maintain a healthy diet, whether you are gluten-free or not. Share your thoughts below. Source: Researchgate.net.
  17. Celiac.com 11/04/2014 - Not long ago, the market for gluten-free products was regarded as a market of specialty products intended for niche shoppers and vendors. That has changed rapidly, as the market has evolved into a bona fide mainstream market serving shoppers with a strong affiliation for gluten-free products. The overall market for gluten-free products is currently dominated by North American manufacturers and vendors, followed by their European counterparts. An abundance of new products and steadily rising consumer demand are driving the strong growth in the gluten-free products market. A comprehensive new report in the market breaks down the overall market into geographic and products segments. The report is titled “Gluten-Free Products Market by Type (Bakery & Confectionery, Snacks, Breakfast Cereals, Baking Mixes & Flour, and Meat & Poultry Products), Sales Channel (Natural & Conventional) & Geography - Global Trends & Forecasts to 2019” The report divides the gluten-free products market into four geographical segments, North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and ROW. North America is projected to witness the highest growth rate in the market. The report defines and analyzes the market in terms of monetary value, volume, trends, opportunities, burning issues, winning imperatives, and challenges. Those interested in the full report can browse 193 market data tables and 32 figures spread through 366 pages and in-depth TOC on "Gluten-Free Products Market by Type (Bakery & Confectionery, Snacks, Breakfast Cereals, Baking Mixes & Flour, and Meat & Poultry Products), Sales Channel (Natural & Conventional) & Geography - Global Trends & Forecasts to 2019".
  18. Celiac.com 07/11/2014 - The latest edition of the report "Gluten-Free Products Market By Type” is now available. The report breaks down the gluten-free products market into the following categories including Bakery & Confectionery, Snacks, Breakfast Cereals, Baking Mixes & Flour, Meat & Poultry Products), Sales Channel (Natural & Conventional) & Geography, and uses analysis and forecasting of the global revenue and volume for gluten-free products to project global trends & forecasts to 2018. The report also identifies the driving and restraining factors for the global gluten-free product market with an analysis of trends, opportunities, burning issues, winning imperatives, and challenges. The market is segmented and revenue is forecast on the basis of major regions such as North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and Rest of the World (ROW). The report offers 189 market data tables with 47 figures spread through 433 pages and in-depth TOC on "Gluten-Free Products Market". Among other revelations, the latest version of the report projects a gluten-free products market worth $6.2 billion dollars, and growing at a CAGR of 10.2% by 2018. Read more at digitaljournal.com. The full report is available for purchase at marketsandmarkets.com.
  19. Am J Health-Syst Pharm 58(05):396-401, 2001 Celiac.com 04/12/2001 - Patients with celiac disease must eliminate all gluten from their diets, including any that might be present in the pharmaceutical or nutritional products that they consume. Researchers Sister Jeanne Patricia Crowe and Nancy Patin Falini designed a study to identify pharmaceutical companies whose policy is to manufacture only gluten-free products, and to determine the accuracy of product information held by companies whose products might contain gluten. The accuracy of this information is crucial for the effective treatment of patients with celiac disease. The researchers mailed 172 surveys to pharmaceutical companies listed in the 1998 Physicians Desk Reference and the 1998 generics supplement to Pharmacy Times, and made follow up telephone calls to companies that did not respond. The survey was strictly designed to determine the companies’ policies with regard to the use of gluten in their products, and if they use gluten, to determine their knowledge with regard to its content in their products. Almost all of the 100 companies that responded to the surveys (52 surveys, 26 letters and 22 oral responses were received) warned that they could not guarantee the possibility that minute amounts of gluten contaminants existed in the raw materials for their inactive ingredients. Many also warned that their products were gluten-free at the time of the survey, but their suppliers of raw materials for their inactive ingredients could change at any time without notice, and this could affect the gluten-free status of their products. Out of all those who responded, only five had a policy of producing gluten-free products, and could guarantee the gluten-free status of their products. Another group of respondents did not refer to their products as gluten free but stated that they added no ingredients derived from wheat, oats, rye, barley, or spelt. Many companies responded with legal disclaimers stating that although they believed that their products did not contain gluten, they neither certified their gluten-free status nor tested them for gluten. Some said that they could not make this guarantee because of the uncertainty with their suppliers of raw materials. Some said that their responses concerning ingredients were only as current as the date of correspondence. Currently few medications are labeled “gluten-free,” and labeling medications as such would be a great help to those on gluten-free diets. With most products a patient, pharmacist or doctor must periodically contact the manufacturer to determine the continuing gluten-free status of the product. This process is time consuming and costly for all involved. A reliable means of determining the gluten-free status of medications and nutritional products is badly needed, and is essential to the health of people on gluten-free diets.
  20. Celiac.com 01/22/2014 - With many major grocery brands struggling to generate sales growth, and with top gluten-free brands Udi's and Glutino racking up combined net sales growth of 53% last quarter, the writing is on the wall: More and more wheat based brands will be looking to break into the gluten-free market in the next three to five years. Boulder Brands CEO Steve Hughes told analysts on the firm's Q3 earnings call that Boulder is seeing "strong, consistent velocity in distribution builds across all channels" for gluten-free products. According to Hughes, 5-10% of all wheat-based product categories will be gluten-free in the next three to five years, or else they will disappear from the market. Again, as many wheat-based brands struggle for market share, Udi’s remains the fastest-growing brand in the conventional grocery store channel, and retailers are responding. Hughes said that Udi's 3rd quarter net sales were up 74% year-over-year, adding that "Glutino net sales grew 29%. Combined, our gluten-free brands increased net sales 53%." Udi's and Glutino now average nearly twenty items on retail shelves, up from about fifteen and a half just a year ago. Meanwhile, Hughes notes, the gluten-free pizza business has been performing“extraordinarily well.” He points out that many retailers now have three dedicated gluten-free sections, including a 4-12ft section in the ambient grocery aisles, half the full door in the frozen food aisles, and a frozen or shelf-stable rack in bakery. Hughes wrapped up his presentation by adding that gluten-free items are also gaining a share of the club store channel. He said that they were "...starting to get some testing of bread into the club channel, which could be very meaningful next year.” Hughes' presentation does imply that growth also means the pressures of competition for market share, both among gluten-free manufacturers and retailers, and between gluten-free and wheat-based manufacturers and retailers. All of this is basically good news for consumers of gluten-free products, as it means more and, hopefully, better quality products. Source: Food Navigator USA
  21. Celiac.com 12/16/2013 - Numerous popular herbal products may be contaminated or may contain unlabeled substitute ingredients and fillers, meaning that they are not what their labels claim. According to the World Health Organization, adulterated herbal products are a potential threat to consumer safety. These revelations came to light after a group of Canadian researchers conducted an investigation into herbal product integrity and authenticity, with hopes of protecting consumers from health risks associated with product substitution and contamination. Using a test called DNA barcoding, a kind of genetic fingerprinting that been effective in uncovering labeling fraud in other commercial industries, the researchers found that nearly 60% of herbal products tested were not what their label claimed them to be, and that pills labeled as popular herbs were often diluted or replaced entirely, sometimes with cheap fillers that could be dangerous to consumers. In all, the researchers tested 44 herbal products from 12 companies, along with 30 different species of herbs, and 50 leaf samples collected from 42 herbal species. The researchers were Steven G. Newmaster, Meghan Grguric, Dhivya Shanmughanandhan, Sathishkumar Ramalingam and Subramanyam Ragupathy. They are variously affiliated with the Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, Biodiversity Institute of Ontario (BIO) at the University of Guelph, the Bachelor of Arts and Science Program at the University of Guelph in Guelph, Ontario, Canada, and with the Plant Genetic Engineering Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Bharathiar University in Tamil Nadu, India. Their laboratory also assembled the first standard reference material (SRM) herbal barcode library from 100 herbal species of known provenance that were used to identify the unknown herbal products and leaf samples. The team recovered DNA barcodes from most herbal products (91%) and all leaf samples (100%), with 95% species resolution using a tiered approach (rbcL + ITS2). Nearly 60% of the products tested contained DNA barcodes from plant species not listed on the labels. That means they were not what the label said they were. Furthermore, even though 48% of the products contained authentic ingredients, one-third of those also contained contaminants and/or fillers not listed on the label. The air data showed clearly that most herbal products tested were not what their labels claim, while most of the rest were poor quality, and often contained unlabeled, possibly dangerous, product substitute, contamination and fillers. They note that selling weak, ineffective, or mislabeled herbal supplements reduces the perceived value of otherwise helpful products by eroding consumer confidence. The study team recommends that the herbal industry embrace DNA barcoding to ensure authentic herbal products by effectively documenting raw manufacturing materials. They suggest that the use of an SRM DNA herbal barcode library for testing bulk materials could provide a method for 'best practices' in the manufacturing of herbal products, and note that this would provide consumers with safe, high quality herbal products. What do you think? Should herbal products and supplements be tested, authenticated and verified? Share your thoughts below. Source: BMC Medicine 2013, 11:222. doi:10.1186/1741-7015-11-222
  22. Celiac.com 09/12/2013 - The most recent industry report by Research and Markets offers a comprehensive analysis of key players in the gluten-free product industry, major gluten-free product types and their sales channels, with commentary on developments and trends. The report also provides a detailed analysis on various phases of numerous aspects of the gluten-free products industry, along with the competitive strategies favored by major industry players. Among the reports insights: As large supermarkets and mass retailers offer more gluten-free products, gluten-free sales by health and natural food stores are declining. Over the last ten years, as millions of Americans have stopped consuming products containing gluten from wheat, barley, or rye, the market for gluten-free foods and other products has shifted, and many products once regarded as specialty or niche products are now regarded as regular grocery items. The report projects global gluten-free product market to reach $6.2 billion at a CAGR of 10.2% by 2018. The report also provides market details and analysis for North America, now the largest market for gluten-free products, and for Europe, which is expected to show significant growth in the market in the near future. Some of that growth is attributed to a steady stream of new gluten-free products in the market, offering additional nutrition, new ingredients or flavors. The also report projects increased demand countries such as U.K., Italy, U.S., Spain, Germany, Australia, Brazil, Canada, and India, among others. The full report is available for purchase at: Gluten-Free Products Market By Type (Bakery & Confectionery, Snacks, Breakfast Cereals, Baking Mixes & Flour, Meat & Poultry Products), Sales Channel (Natural & Conventional) & Geography — Global Trends & Forecasts To 2018
  23. Celiac.com 08/05/2013 - It's well-publicized that the market for gluten-free products continues to experience double-digit growth. A new analysis of the various segments of the global gluten-free product market is helping researchers to better understand the finer aspects of the market, and to better forecast global volume and revenue prospects for gluten-free products. It also looks at the major forces both driving and impeding the global gluten-free product market. The report, called the "Gluten-Free Products Market By Type (Bakery & Confectionery, Snacks, Breakfast Cereals, Baking Mixes & Flour, Meat & Poultry Products), Sales Channel (Natural & Conventional) & Geography - Global Trends & Forecasts To 2018,"is issued by RnRMarketResearch.com. The report data is is broken down on the basis of geographic region, by gluten-free product type: bakery and confectionery; breakfast cereals; snacks; baking mixes and flour; meat and poultry products, or other gluten-free foods, such as sauces, dressings, beverages, dairy products, etc. It is also broken down by type of sales channel, that is natural health food stores, or conventional retailers. The data are further divided by chain or single store, grocery, mass merchandiser, club store, drug store, or other type of retailer, such as e-retailers, mail orders etc. According to the report, public perception that gluten-free foods are healthier than conventional products is the most important factor fueling gluten-free food sales. Other factors include ongoing improvement of gluten-free products, and increasing retail availability. Detracting from growth is the fact that many consumers do not know the difference between an allergy and intolerance, and many consumers remain undiagnosed for celiac disease, or gluten-intolerance. Be that as it may, the global gluten-free products market is projected to maintain a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 10.2%, and to exceed of $6.2 billion by 2018. Once again, the data show that gluten-free bakery and confectionery products account for the largest share of gluten-free product sales, at about 46%, followed by gluten-free snacks, which account for about 20%. During the time projected, the north American market will account for nearly 60% of total global gluten-free food revenues. Highest consumption of gluten-free product in the global market was through conventional sales channels. This rising demand and rising variety of goods has made chain supermarkets and mass merchandisers the preferred retail channel for gluten-free product purchases. Globally, the market for gluten-free products market has seen rapid growth, but nothing like the consistent double-digit growth seen in North America and Europe. There, companies The Hain Celestial Inc. (U.S.), General Mills Inc. (U.S.), Dr. Schar (Italy), Amy's Kitchen Inc. (U.S.), and Boulders Brand Inc. (U.S), have a huge influence on overall market dynamics. Source: rnrmarketresearch.com.
  24. Celiac.com 05/02/2013 - Even though gluten-free baked goods are getting slowly better than in the past, many gluten-free baked goods on the market today taste worse than their traditional counterparts made with wheat flour, and may also lead to nutritional deficiencies of vitamins, minerals and fiber. Thus, the production of high-quality gluten-free products has become a very important issue. Microbial fermentation using lactic acid bacteria and yeast is one of the most ecological sensitive and economically sound methods of producing and preserving food. A team of researchers recently set out to determine how microbial fermentation with lactic acid bacteria might be used to make better gluten-free products. The research team included E. Zannini, E. Pontonio, D.M. Waters, and E.K.Arendt of the School of Food and Nutritional Sciences at the University College Cork in Western Road, in Cork, Ireland. Their recent article in Applied Microbiology and Microtechnology reviews the role of sourdough fermentation in creating better quality gluten-free baked goods, and for developing a new concept of gluten-free products with therapeutic and health-promoting characteristics. Source: Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. 2012 Jan;93(2):473-85. doi: 10.1007/s00253-011-3707-3.
  25. I recently gave in and purchased the NutriBullet. This is a new blender from the makers of the MagicBullet. There are many differences with the NutriBullet and the MagicBullet. The first would be the look. The NB is so much bigger than the MB. The blades are different as well. With the MB there are only 4 small blades while the NB has 6 large blades. One difference that you cannot see is the power, internally there is more juice. Now the NB suggests you put 50% leafy greens, 50% fruits and some seeds or nuts and top off with water. I have one for breakfast and generally one with or after supper. This is an amazing product. It literally extracts all of the good stuff our bodies need and sometimes do not get by just eating the foods. Sometimes things like the skins just go through us and our bodies do not have a chance to fully digest all of the nutrients. The NB truly blends EVERYTHING you put in it! I was able to see a difference within the first few days. I am sleeping better, feeling better and I know I am doing better. This was recommended to me by a friend, I used it and recommended it to another friend, she used it and recommended to another friend.... It is a chain reaction. Be the first in your group to bring this life changing product in.
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