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Found 6 results

  1. Celiac.com 04/15/2015 - The steep costs of getting food onto the shelves at major grocery chains has claimed another notable start-up, the Charlotte-based gluten-free foods company, Bumbalooza. The quick, promising rise and rapid demise of Bumbalooza still troubles sisters-in-law Holly Paeper and Monique Prato. In just two short years, their Charlotte-based gluten-free foods company, Bumbalooza, rose to prominence in the specialty foods community, winning fans, customers and awards. Their promising start looked even rosier when, against stiff competition, the team won the Charlotte Chamber's Power Up Challenge, complete with a check for $25,000. The Power Up award is bestowed on small-business owners who provide innovative products, earn $1 million or less in revenue. But just months later, Bumbalooza was facing dire straights due to high shelving costs for their products. Soon, the duo had to give up their distribution warehouse, and their office, and quickly stopped selling gluten-free baking mixes altogether. They say they spent thousands and paid grocery chains more than $20,000 each in "slotting fees" to get Bumbalooza products on store shelves, only to face delayed and partial payments. They declined to name the large grocers involved. Faced with high costs and impaired revenue, Prato and Paeper decided that closing was their best option. Sadly, Bumbalooza is not the first, nor likely the last, food company to tumble as a result of high shelving costs. Source: The Charlotte Observer.
  2. Celiac.com 03/25/2011 - A group of researchers recently set out to evaluate cladribine [2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (2-CdA)] therapy in refractory celiac disease (RCD) â…¡. The team included Greetje J. Tack, Wieke H. M. Verbeek, Abdul Al-Toma, Dirk J. Kuik, Marco W. J. Schreurs, Otto Visser, Chris J. J. Mulder of the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, at VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Between 2000 and 2010, the research team conducted an open-label cohort-study of RCD â…¡ patients treated with 2-CdA. They assessed survival rate, enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) occurrence, clinical course, and histological and immunological response rates. The study followed a total of 32 patients over an average 31-month period. Eighteen patients responded well to 2-CdA. Patients responsive to 2-CdA showed markedly higher survival rates, compared to unresponsive patients. The responder group showed an 83% survival rate at the 3- and 5-year mark, compared to rates of 63% and 22% in the non-responder group. The responder group showed an 81% clinical, histological and immunological response rates at the 2-year mark, compared to rates of 47% and 41% in the non-responder group. 16% of non-responsive patients progressed into EATL, and all of these patients died. Because 2-CdA shows excellent clinical and histological response rates, and probably less frequent transition into EATL, it looks like a promising treatment for RCD II. Source: World J Gastroenterol. 2011 January 28; 17(4): 506–513. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v17.i4.506.
  3. Celiac.com 07/20/2012 - Many of the millions of Americans who suffer from celiac disease and gluten-intolerance are eagerly awaiting the FDA's forthcoming standards for gluten-free product labeling. Until then, different agencies may apply differing standards, often with confusing results. The recent dust-up between Widmer Bros. brewing of Oregon, one of many breweries crafting gluten-free beers, and the Treasury Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau ("TTB") over the ingredients in Widmer's gluten-free brew, provides a good illustration of the confusion that can arise when different sets of standards and rules govern what can and cannot be called 'gluten-free.' Widmer Bros. is a division of Craft Brew Alliance (CBA), the nation’s ninth’s largest brewing company, and recently unveiled two new gluten-free beers, Omission Gluten Free Lager and Omission Gluten Free Pale Ale. Unlike most gluten-free beers, which are brewed from sorghum and usually taste very different than traditional beers, Omission is made using traditional ingredients, including barley--which contains gluten. Widmer then uses enzymes to reduce the gluten in both beers to a level that is well below the 20 parts per million (ppm) gluten threshold set by the World Health Organization for gluten-free products; the very standard likely to be followed soon by the FDA. Professional testing show gluten levels for Omission beers at just 5-6 ppm. Meanwhile, those familiar with the final products say they taste very much like traditional beers. However, it is not the gluten levels in the beer that seems to be at issue, but the fact that Widmer begins their brewing process with barley and other traditional ingredients. According to the TTB, wine, beer or distilled spirits made from ingredients that contain gluten cannot be labeled as ‘gluten-free.’ Certainly the commonly accepted European standard of 20 ppm means that the vast majority of products labeled 'gluten-free' still contain measurable levels of gluten, a good deal of those likely above the 5-6 ppm of Widmer's beers. For beer drinkers with celiac disease, finding a gluten-free beer that tastes like a traditional beer is like finding the Holy Grail. Given that Omission beers supposedly taste closer to traditional beers than most gluten-free beers currently on the market, and given that they come in well below the standard for products to be labeled gluten-free, there are undoubtedly a number of people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance that are hoping Widmer will prevail in their battle against the TTB. What do you think? Should the gluten-free standard be based on scientifically established gluten levels of the final product, or on the gluten levels in the ingredients originally used to create it? Should Widmer be allowed to label and sell their Omission beers as 'gluten-free?' Source: KXL.com
  4. Celiac.com 04/01/2011 - Cephalon has signed an agreement that gives the company the option to purchase a potentially promising new treatment for celiac disease from Alba Therapeutics. The deal calls for Cephalon to pay Alba a $7 million upfront fee, and to offering funding support for a phase IIb trial of the drug in question, a tight junction modulator known as larazotide acetate. The deal allows Cephalon to acquire all assets relating to the treatment for an additional payment of $15 million, within specified time window, once trial data have been published Cephalon CEO, Kevin Buchi, said the company's interest is based on encouraging trial data for the drug thus far. If larazotide acetate proves to be effective against celiac disease, it "has the potential to be the first pharmacologic therapy available to treat patients who endure this often serious condition," Buchi said. Source: Zenopa.com
  5. Celiac.com 03/16/2010 - Enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) is a rare type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma that is commonly associated with celiac disease. A group at The Newcastle Lymphoma Group in the United Kingdom, evaluated data from newly diagnosed patients in Northern England and Scotland between 1994 and 1998, in search of increased overall survival (OS) rates and progression free survival (PFS) rates for EATL patients. Celiac disease (celiac disease) is the most common food intolerance disorder affecting Western civilization today. While most celiacs show an improvement in their health after initiating a gluten free diet, 2-5% of patients do not improve, and are thus considered to have refractory celiac disease (RCD). RCD is further classified into two categories, Type 1 with intraepithelial lymphocytes of normal phenotype, or as type 2 with clonal expansion of intraepithelial lymphocytes with an aberrant phenotype. Type 2 patients are expected to have a five year overall survival rate (OS) of 50%-58%, and most Type 2 RCD patients die from EATL. EATL generally affects older patients in their 60's or 70's, with a history of celiac disease or RCD, and is most frequently presented in the form of malabsorption along with abdominal pain. However, EATL is not exclusive to patients with celiac disease or RCD and has also been found in patients without a history of either. Standard treatments until now have included surgical resection, with or without anthracycline-based chemotherapy, or high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). Results of these treatments have been dismal, with the patient typically dying from disease related complications. Using a population-based setting, 26 EATL patients that qualified for intensive treatment were given the new aggressive treatment of, ifosfamide, vincristine, etoposide / methotrexate (IVE/MTX) & ASCT, and their results were compared to that of the historical group. Statistically there was no difference between the groups; all groups had similar age, sex and features at initial evaluation. For all patients treated with the historical cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone (CHOP) therapy, the average PFS rate was approximately three months, and the average OS rate was about seven months. However, the IVE/MTX - ASCT group showed a significantly higher five year PFS and OS compared to patients treated with the historical CHOP therapy. Additionally, patients treated with IVE/MTX - ASCT showed improvement in their remission rates, and had profound reduction of death rates compared to the group treated with the historical CHOP chemotherapy. Of the patients that were solely treated with surgery, none survived. While EATL has a somber outcome for most patients treated with conventional CHOP treatments, data collected from these tests reveal that the regime IVE/MTX – ASCT shows exceptional promise as a new treatment. It is recommended that EATL patients enter themselves into national studies like this one, to expand research data and to help explore potentially effective EATL treatment options. Source: DOI 10.1182/blood-2009-07-231324.
  6. Celiac.com 07/30/2007 - A study published in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology suggests that a newly proposed system of classifying duodenal pathology on celiac disease provides an improved inter-observation than the less Marsh-Oberhuber classification, and offers an advance towards making a simpler, better, more valid diagnosis of celiac disease. Celiac disease is presently classified according to the Marsh-Oberhuber system of classifying duodenal lesions. Recently, a more elementary method has been suggested. That method is based on three villous morphologies—non-atrophic, atrophic with villous crypto ratio <3:1, and atrophic, villi idnetectable—combined with intraepithelial counts of >25/100 enterocytes. The study team chose a group of sixty people to be part of the study. Of the 60 patients the team studied, 46 were female and 14 were male. The average age was 28.2 years with a mean range of 1-78 years. 10 people had celiac disease, 13 had celiac disease with normal villi, but a pathological increase in epithelial lymphocytes >25/100 & hyperplastic crypts. 37 patients had celiac disease with villous aptrophy. Patients were given biopsies, with at least 4 biopsies were taken from the second part of the duodenum. Biopsies were fixed in formalin and processed according to standard procedures, with cuts at six levels, and stained with hematoxylin resin. The slides were sent randomly to 6 pathologists who were blind to one another. The results showed that this new method of classification yielded better inter-observer agreement and more accurate diagnosis that the more difficult Marsh-Oberhuber system. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology 2007;5:838–843 health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.
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