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Found 10 results

  1. Celiac.com 01/30/2018 - Numerous clinicians have reported higher levels of celiac disease markers in their patients with psoriasis. A number of researchers believe that some psoriasis patients suffer from asymptomatic celiac disease, and a number of patients have reported symptom improvements with gluten-free diets. A team of researchers recently set out to determine the prevalence of antigliadin IgA antibodies in psoriasis vulgaris, and to assess the response of seropositive patients to a gluten-free diet. The research team included Nikolai A Kolchak, Maria K Tetarnikova, Maria S Theodoropoulou, Alexandra P Michalopoulou, and Demetrios S Theodoropoulos. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Hematology, Omsk State Medical Academy, Omsk, Russia; Dermatology Private Practice, Chelyabinsk, Russia; Department of Pharmacy, Trikala General Hospital, Trikala, Greece; Department of Philosophy and Social Studies, School of Philosophy, University of Crete, Rethymnon, Greece; and Allergy Associates of La Crosse, Onalaska, WI, USA. The team assessed the prevalence of gliadin IgA antibodies among patients with psoriasis in an urban population, along with noting the clinical effects of a strict gluten-free diet. The team recruited 97 patients with Psoriasis Area and Severity Index greater than 2.4 from a dermatology clinic. They measured gliadin IgA antibodies in all participants and in 91 control subjects. They found elevated gliadin IgA antibodies in 13 patients, and two controls. All 13 patients were placed on a strict gluten-free diet without any other modifications in their ongoing treatment of psoriasis. Psoriasis patients who do not have celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity commonly show high levels of antigliadin IgA antibody. These results show that antigliadin IgA testing can identify psoriasis patients likely to benefit from a gluten-free diet. Source: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare. DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/JMDH.S122256
  2. Hello, i have just joined the forum and i have decided to start a gluten free diet. I have both psoriasis and type 2 diabetes, both diseases that fare well gluten free. I will see my doctor on the 27th and ask for his assistance. In the meantime i just google away hoping to find good information i can apply to my life. If you have any information you would recommend a "newbie" look at online or in book form i would appreciate any help that you could give. With everything else that i am dealing with, starting a gluten free diet does not look too easy for me. That said, i am tired of "not feeling well" so much, especially right after i eat, so making a good diet change does seem to be in order.
  3. I have been trying to put all the pieces together since my diagnosis 1.5 yrs ago. I have been having lingering neuro symptoms that no one can figure out. I have been checked for seizures, all other autoimmunes etc...and of course, my file at the hospital needs it's own zip code. I know there is something else wrong....could it still be the damage from the celiac? Of course, but in my gut (no pun intended) I believe it is more. I have been logging lately, and it came to me this morning. OMG, could it be RICE? I am extremely sensitive to gluten exposure. I react insanely to gluten-free oats. The celiac doc put me on the Fasano diet. I did well, and there was some improvement with sleeping through the night. Neuro symptoms were still present, and to me, seemed worse. My brain would have a fluttering sensation at times, extreme dizziness/ lightheadedness, weakness to name a few symptoms (bone pain, back pain, arm pain etc) odd episodes where I could barely walk or speak from weakness. My psoriasis has been very angry lately What did I rely heavily on during the Fasano? RICE. The week I was away at the cottage, what did I eat for almost 2 meals a day? RICE. That was probably my worst week. The past few days, the dizziness has returned...I had chicken coated in a heavy brown rice flour mix, and made banana bread from a rice flour blend (which I generally don't eat). However, I cannot really find a link with rice and neuro issues. So maybe I am just grasping at straws here. But it seems to be a big coincidence. Also, when I was extremely ill before my dx, I could barely eat or keep food in. My neuro symptoms were off the charts then. I lived on rice cakes......sometimes twice a day....
  4. Hi everyone! So I have had scalp/skin seborrhea for the past 3 years. My dermatologist has prescribed me numerous ointments and medications, all of which i stopped applying after I googled the ingredients. About 7 months ago I was speaking to a family friend who is currently in med school, he advised me to try cutting out gluten as dermatitis was an inflammatory disease which can be triggered by the protein in gluten. I immediately stopped eating gluten and within weeks all signs of my SD were gone. Even if I cheated a little bit, I would immediately get red and itchy. I don't completely understand the correlation between gluten and seborrhea but I have read that gluten causes autoimmune reactions in the body. Psoriasis runs in my family as well as asthma, arthritis, reflux and IBS. I have had acid reflux since I was born as well. I am thinking about being tested for Celiac's but I have had an endoscopy before and all they diagnosed me with was reflux. If anyone has any thoughts on this or has experienced the same thing please share. i do not completely understand the idea of gluten intolerance quite yet! Thanks
  5. Celiac.com 05/19/2012 - Because a number of past studies examining the connection between celiac disease and psoriasis have had contradictory findings, researchers wanted to get a better idea of the actual risk of psoriasis in patients with biopsy-verified celiac disease. The researchers were J.F. Ludvigsson, B. Lindelöf, F. Zingone, and C. Ciacci, with the Department of Pediatrics at Sweden's Örebro University Hospital. For their study, they used data from 28 pathology departments in Sweden to identified individuals with celiac disease diagnosed between 1969 and 2008. They found 28,958 patients with Marsh 3 villous atrophy. They then used Cox regression to compare those celiac disease patients with 143,910 sex- and age-matched control subjects, and to assess the risk of psoriasis. They found that celiac disease was a risk factor for future psoriasis (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.72; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.54-1.92. They found that, during follow-up, 401 individuals with celiac disease and 1,139 controls were diagnosed with psoriasis. They found that the absolute risk of future psoriasis in patients with celiac disease was 135 per 100,000 person-years, with an excess risk of 57 cases per 100,000 person years. Overall, 42% of the cases of psoriasis in patients with celiac disease could be attributed to celiac disease. Moreover, in children the team saw a strong association between celiac disease and psoriasis (HR = 2.05; 95% CI = 1.62-2.60). Their results show that the connection between celiac disease and psoriasis seems to be far more than coincidental, as we also found a positive association between celiac disease and psoriasis before celiac diagnosis, with an odds ratio of 1.91; 95% CI = 1.58-2.31). They conclude that individuals with celiac disease do, in fact, face an increased risk of psoriasis both before and after celiac diagnosis. Source: J Invest Dermatol. 2011 Oct;131(10):2010-6. doi: 10.1038/jid.2011.162.
  6. Jennifer Arrington

    Psoriasis and Celiac Disease

    Celiac.com 10/12/2009 - I recently read an article in The Economist, of all places, that intrigued me. Titled, “Breathe Easy”, (The Economist, May 23, 2009, page 85) it explained a link between eczema and asthma. What intrigued me was the mechanism: researchers showed that a signaling molecule called thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) secreted by damaged skin cells can enter the blood stream and eventually sensitize the lungs to react to what should be harmless allergens. So, why my intrigue? Well, I am severely gluten intolerant and have had psoriasis my entire life. Natural doctors bemoan the fact that my ultra sensitivity to anything and everything (from vitamins and whole-food supplements to Chinese herbs) prevents them from being able to help me. I wondered if TSLP from damaged psoriatic skin cells had sensitized my gut to react to what would otherwise be harmless food substances. A quick search proved quite helpful. First and foremost, Scott Adams had already reviewed an article that established a link between celiac disease and psoriasis back in November of 2004 (Br.J. Dermatol. 2004 Oct;151(4):891-4) 2004). Also, a peer-reviewed journal search yielded hundreds of results that showed this was not one isolated study. So, what about celiac disease and asthma? Well, once again, a quick search of the celiac.com site showed many bloggers and authors personally discussing this very link. Next, I went to the medical literature in the hopes of finding whether or not TSLP could be considered the culprit for hyper sensitizing me to an ever increasing list of food substances—gluten is only the start. Researchers have proven that elevated T cells (Bulletin of Experimental Biology & Medicine. 2004 Mar; 137(3):302-7) and eosinophils ( Allergy & Asthma Proceedings. 2004 Jul-Aug; 25(4): 253-9) are found in the intestinal mucosa of patients with asthma thus proving a link of lung mucosa to gut mucosa. If elevated TSLP from damaged skin cells could lead to asthma, and the mucosa of the lungs is linked to the mucosa of the gut, then hypothetically elevated TSLP could lead to a hypersensitive gut. In other words, damaged skin cells from psoriasis elevate levels of TSLP and patients with psoriasis often have celiac disease. There is also a link between TSLP and asthma and a link between asthma and celiac disease. Thus, it could be argued that the TSLP from damaged skin cells plays a role in sensitizing the gut to previously harmless food substances. Now if only a researcher out there would design a study to prove me right! What does this to for me? Not much at the moment, although, I do find it incredibly interesting. What can this exercise in possible commutability do for all of us? Maybe train us to view our bodies as an entire, interrelated system and to take our skin lesions seriously. What do I do to keep my psoriasis at bay? I hold fast to the gluten free diet and consume vast quantities of fish oil which, incidentally, also aids in restoring a damaged intestinal lining…
  7. Celiac.com 04/12/2010 - A team of researchers recently set out to look at connections between psoriasis, the liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. The team was made up of Paolo Gisondi, Micol Del Giglio, Alessandra Cozzi & Giampiero Girolomoni. They are associated with the Section of Dermatology and Venereology of the Department of Medicine, at the University of Verona, Italy. Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory, immune-mediated skin disease that is often tied to other disorders, including psoriatic arthropathy, chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, and cardio-metabolic disorders. Additionally, about 50% of all patients patients with psoriasis suffer from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, from 0.2–4.3% suffer from celiac disease, and about one half of one percent suffer from Crohn's disease. These associated conditions may have some common genetic traits, as well as common inflammatory pathways, and their presence offers important implications in the global approach to treating psoriasis. In particular, common systemic antipsoriatic drugs might have a negative affect on associated cardio-metabolic conditions and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and may have important interactions with drugs commonly used to treat psoriasis. Moreover, the team emphasizes the importance of encouraging psoriasis patients to drastically improve their modifiable cardiovascular and liver risk factors, especially obesity, alcohol and smoking intake, because improvements could have positive impact on both the psoriasis and the patient's general well-being. Source: Dermatologic Therapy, Volume 23 Issue 2, Pages 155 - 159 - DOI: 10.1111/j.1529-8019.2010.01310.x
  8. Celiac.com 09/10/2010 - Women who regularly drink beer may face higher risk of developing psoriasis, an autoimmune disorder that causes skin rashes and other, according to a new study, though beverages, such as light beer and wine, showed no such elevated risk. For the study, a team of researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Boston University enrolled 82,869 women who were not originally diagnosed with psoriasis. They monitored the women for nearly fifteen years, from 1991 through 2005. During the study period, subjects used the women Nurses' Health Study II to report their regular alcohol consumption, and any diagnosis of psoriasis. The results showed that even relatively small amounts of beer corresponded to an increase psoriasis diagnosis. Women who drank just 2.3 beers a week saw their psoriasis rates rise by almost 80%. For women who drink five regular beers a week, the risk of developing psoriasis is nearly double that of non-drinkers. Does this mean women shouldn't drink beer? Not exactly. "We can say that if a woman would like to consume alcohol and if she has a family history of psoriasis or known psoriasis in the past or some other reason she might be predisposed to psoriasis, the alcohol of choice probably should not be nonlight beer," said Dr. Abrar A. Qureshi, lead author of an article on the study published in Archives of Dermatology. But Bruce Bebo, director of research and medical programs at the National Psoriasis Foundation, says the findings warrant "more investigation to determine whether there's a real connection or not." Earlier studies have also tied psoriasis rates to alcohol consumption, although the nature of this connection is not well understood. The fact that no other types of alcohol in this study showed the same association with psoriasis was of particular interest to Bebo. "There is evidence that alcohol consumption can affect immune responses and psoriasis is an autoimmune disease," Bebo said. "There's also some evidence that it can affect the biology of keratinocytes (certain skin cells). But ... then why would it be nonlight beer, why not wine or other alcohol? Maybe there's something in wine that ... might reverse the effect." Another study in the same issue of journal reports that people with psoriasis suffer higher rates of depression, anxiety and even suicidal thoughts. That study, by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, found that men with psoriasis suffered from these adverse mental health outcomes more than women. Source: U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health
  9. Celiac.com 07/29/2010 - The underlying causes of psoriasis are not well understood. Many patients with psoriasis also have a sensitivity to gluten. In an effort to better understand any connection between psoriasis, celiac disease, and the HLA Cw6 genotype, a research team examined the expression of celiac-associated antibodies gliadin IgA, gliadin IgG, and tissue transglutaminase IgA, and possible associations the antibodies may have with the HLA Cw6 gene in people with psoriasis. The team included Sangeeta Singh, Gyanendra Kumar Sonkar, Usha, and Sanjay Singh. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Immunopathology in the Department of Pathology at the Institute of Medical Sciences, the Department of Dermatology and Venereology, and the Academic Staff College at Banaras Hindu University in Varanasi, India. Antigens are substances that are recognized by the immune system and trigger an immune reaction. Class I human histocompatibility (HLA) antigens are coded into a small cluster of structural genes at the C locus on chromosome 6. They show substantially lower immune-triggering action than the HLA-A and -B determinants, and so are not a major factor in medical donations. Researchers find them useful because of their high-risk association with certain diseases, such as spondylarthritis, psoriasis, multiple myeloma. About 50 percent of all psoriasis patients carry HLC-Cw6. For the study the team evaluated 56 patients with psoriasis, along with 60 healthy control subjects. The team used ELISA to measure antibody levels, and the microcytotoxicity method to type HLA Cw6. Blood samples of psoriasis patients showed significant HLA Cw6 expression compared with control subjects (P Psoriasis patients showed substantially higher celiac-associated antibodies for gliadin IgA/IgG and tissue transglutaminase IgA compared with control subjects (P Women showed substantially higher serum anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA (anti tTG IgA) than did men. Older patients showed higher expressions than did their younger counterparts. Antibodies showed significant positive correlation (anti-gliadin IgA with anti-gliadin IgG: r=0.67, P. From their results, the team concludes that patients with psoriasis commonly show latent celiac disease or celiac-associated antibodies, but that HLA Cw6 is not connected with expression of these antibodies in patients with psoriasis. Source: Journal of Clinical Laboratory Analysis, Volume 24 Issue 4, Pages 269 - 272
  10. Br J Dermatol. 2004 Oct;151(4):891-4 Celiac.com 11/09/2004 – A study carried out by Irish researchers to determine whether there is an association between celiac disease antibodies and psoriasis activity found that the presence of Antigliadin antibodies (AGA) did increase the severity of the disease. The researchers looked at 130 patients with psoriasis and screened them for serum IgG and IgA AGA, IgA antitransglutaminase and IgA antiendomysial antibodies. The patients were invited to undertake an endoscopy with duodenal biopsy. They found that a significantly higher proportion of psoriasis patients had elevated celiac disease associated antibody levels, and those with elevated antibodies had previously required systemic immunosuppressants or psoralen plus ultraviolet A phototherapy. Out of the 130 patients one new case of celiac disease was diagnosed. The researchers conclude that the presence of celiac disease associated antibodies in psoriasis patients correlates with greater psoriasis activity.
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