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Found 30 results

  1. Celiac.com 05/19/2018 - Looking for a nutritious, delicious meal that is both satisfying and gluten-free? This tasty quinoa salad is just the thing for you. Easy to make and easy to transport to work. This salad of quinoa and vegetables gets a rich depth from chicken broth, and a delicious tang from red wine vinegar. Just pop it in a container, seal and take it to work or school. Make the quinoa a day or two ahead as needed. Add or subtract veggies as you like. Ingredients: 1 cup red quinoa, rinsed well ½ cup water ½ cup chicken broth 2 radishes, thinly sliced 1 small bunch fresh pea sprouts 1 small Persian cucumber, diced 1 small avocado, ripe, sliced into chunks Cherry or grape tomatoes Fresh sunflower seeds 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Directions: Simmer quinoa in water and chicken broth until tender. Dish into bowls. Top with veggies, salt and pepper, and sunflower seeds. Splash with red wine vinegar and enjoy!
  2. Celiac.com 11/17/2017 - Quinoa is actually a seed, but let's not allow taxonomy to come between us and dinner. For our purposes, the fact that quinoa is not a grain may be appropriate, because this salad recipe is not a salad in the traditional sense of lettuces ad vegetables. In fact, this dish is more of a fruit salad with beans and quinoa. Whatever you call it, it's delicious. Toasting your quinoa before cooking before cooking enhances the delicately nutty flavor. Rinsing it well removes the bitter outer coating of saponin. Ingredients: 1 cup canned black beans, rinsed ½ cup quinoa 1 cup water ¼ cup orange juice ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro 2 tablespoons rice vinegar 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil 1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger 1 medium mango, diced 1 small red bell pepper, diced 2 scallions, thinly sliced Dash of salt Directions: Cook quinoa as per directions. Mix together the rest of the ingredients together with the mango in a bowl. Add cooked quinoa and toss to combine. Serve chilled.
  3. Celiac.com 11/15/2017 - Quinoa is regarded as safe for people with celiac disease. For many years, some celiac support groups listed quinoa as unsafe due to cross-contamination concerns. But any grain is unsafe for celiacs if it is contaminated with wheat, rye or barley. Some grains have a higher risk of such contamination, others have a low risk. Based on its low risk for cross-contamination, Celiac.com has had quinoa on our safe list since 1995. A vast amount of evidence supports that listing. The latest research shows that celiac patients can safely tolerate up to 50 g of quinoa daily for 6 weeks. The researchers in this test point out that further studies are needed to assess long-term effects of quinoa consumption. In the short-term test, the researchers looked at 19 treated celiac patients who ate 50 g of quinoa every day for 6 weeks as part of their regular gluten-free diet. The team evaluated diet, serology, and gastrointestinal parameters, and made histological assessments of 10 patients, both before and after they consumed quinoa. The results show that celiac patients seem to tolerate quinoa well, and it doesn't trigger any symptoms or cause any gut damage or dysfunction. The team found normal gut structure and mucosa to confirm that assessment. In fact, patients saw a general improvement histological and serological results, so better gut conditions and less blood antibodies to gluten in patients who ate quinoa. Celiac patients who ate quinoa for 6 weeks also experienced a mild reduction in blood pressure. Overall, this is the first clinical study to show that celiac patients can safely tolerate up to 50 g of quinoa daily for 6 weeks. Obviously, future studies need to look at the safety of long-term quinoa consumption. That said, quinoa seems to be safe for celiac patients on a gluten-free diet. If you really want to be sure, quinoa grown in main producer countries of Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador, where practically no wheat is grown, is probably the safest bet for those on a gluten-free diet.
  4. How can you improve Minute's Ready to Serve Brown Rice & Quinoa Cups? Just add garlic! I thought the non-garlic and non-organic version of their cups were great, and that it would be difficult to improve on the idea, but I was wrong. I had the pleasure of trying their organic version with garlic, and I must say that the savory flavor is even better than the non-garlic version. And who wouldn't go for an organic version when given a choice? Offering an organic version of these cups was a wise decision. Just like the Minute Ready to Serve Brown Rice & Quinoa Cups, which we reviewed last month, the organic with garlic version is ready to eat in only 60 seconds. You just can't beat the convenience offered by these nutritious, high-fiber, and organic cups. For lunch today I made one cup with a side salad, and my coworkers were jealous! Besides being organic, these cups do not contain any preservatives, and you don't need to add anything to prepare them—simply heat one in the microwave for a minute. How could it get any easier—or better?! For more info visit their site.
  5. Celiac.com 08/24/2017 - It's rare to find a quick, nutritious and healthy lunch or snack. Minute's Ready to Serve Brown Rice & Quinoa fits this bill, and contains 16% of daily fiber, which is hard to find in most gluten-free alternatives. Plus it's ready in only 60 seconds I was also surprised by the minimal ingredients in these microwavable cups. Not counting water, they contain only 5 ingredients. The first thing I noticed when trying a cup for lunch was how quick and easy it could be made, and the second thing was how good it was! The rice and quinoa are perfectly moist, and the blend is perfectly salted. I've been able to think of more reasons to have these around than just for lunch or a snack. For example I am thinking about using them as a base for this year's Thanksgiving stuffing. It would take only 3-4 cups for my recipe, and would reduce the amount of work involved by a lot. I've also used these as a side dish with dinner. The other night I made salmon for my family and heated up 4 cups at the same time, added some broccoli on the side, and had a healthy, gluten-free dinner that was much easier to prepare due to having the cups handy. Another idea I had is to stir in peanut butter and honey to the heated rice. I know it sounds weird but I bet it would taste good and would make a great snack. For more info visit their site.
  6. Celiac.com 05/29/2009 - Quinoa is making a comeback as a "wonder grain." Before going gluten free, most people have never heard of quinoa. But, once you embrace the gluten-free lifestyle, you should learn more about this amazing grain. Quinoa is an ancient grain that has been grown in South America for thousands of years and was called the "gold of the Incas." The grain resembles millet and has a bitter protective saponin coating that protects the grain from being eaten by birds and insects. Today, many companies that sell quinoa in the United States remove the bitter saponins. This allows you to prepare the quinoa without having to rinse it first. Quinoa is gluten-free, high in fiber and a complete protein, meaning it has all nine amino acids. Quinoa also contains high amounts of lysine, manganese, magnesium, iron, copper and phosphorus. Due to quinoa being a complete protein, it is an excellent food choice for the gluten-free vegan. To prepare the quinoa for cooking, either purchase pre-rinsed quinoa or rinse the quinoa in a strainer until the saponins are removed. To cook the quinoa, add one part of the grain to two parts liquid in a saucepan. After the mixture is brought to a boil, reduce the heat to simmer and cover. One cup of quinoa cooked in this method usually takes 15 minutes to prepare. When cooking is complete, you will notice that the grains have become translucent, and the white germ has partially detached itself, appearing like a white-spiraled tail. Serve quinoa as a replacement for rice or couscous. Quinoa is delicious served cold or warm and can be frozen and reheated. It is recommended to prepare the entire box of quinoa and freeze the unused portions for later use. Tuscan Quinoa Salad Recipe Ingredients 2 cups cooked quinoa ¼ cup scallions, chopped 2 cloves garlic,minced 1 box cherry tomatoes, sliced in half ½ cup pine nuts, toasted ½ cup fresh parsley, chopped ½ cup fresh basil, chopped 3 T olive oil juice from half of a lemon kosher salt and pepper to taste To Prepare Prepare quinoa according to recipe on package. Add remaining ingredients to quinoa. Season with salt and pepper to your liking. You may replace oil and lemon juice with Italian dressing. Sources for info on quinoa: Quinoa Corporation Eden Organics Homegrown Harvest
  7. Celiac.com 06/28/2016 - My latest obsession is creating new quinoa recipes, since my eight year old daughter absolutely loves it! Her favorite is warm quinoa with crumbled turkey sausage, broccoli, and lots of cumin. She also loves it with oil and balsamic vinegar. I like it cold with chopped veggies, garlic, and fresh squeezed lemon juice. Just a few weeks ago I tried amaranth for the first time. It seems to be the new craze these days. It cooked up very similarly to quinoa, and had a similar taste and texture. I would say the only noticeable difference is that amaranth does not get as fluffy when cooked. It seems like it would be great in soup! Now for a little history. Amaranth is estimated to have been domesticated between 6,000 and 8,000 years ago, and was a staple food crop of the Aztec's. The common name, amaranth, represents over sixty different plant species called amaranthus.(1) The amaranth plant is a full, broad leafed plant that has vibrant colors. Amaranth's name comes from the Greek name, amarantos, meaning "one that does not fade." This is due to the plant retaining its vibrant colors even after harvesting and drying. The amaranth plant can contain up to 60,000 seeds. Amaranth is gluten-free and it contains about thirty percent more protein than rice, sorghum, and rye.(2) Amaranth flour can be made from the seeds and is a excellent replacement for those suffering from celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. Amaranth flour has a unique chemical composition with a predominance of albumins and globulins and a very small prolamins content with total absence of alpha-gliadin. This makes it very comparable to wheat protein(2). It also has a relatively high content of calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and fiber and an almost perfect amino acid profile. It's particularly high in lysine, which is abundantly lacking in wheat and corn.(3) Another benefit of amaranth is that it is a natural source of folic acid, and in some countries, amaranth is used alleviate birth defects. Amaranth is not a true grain, as it does not come from the Poaceae family, but is considered a pseudo-cereal like it's relative quinoa. Both amaranth and quinoa belong to a large family that also includes beets, chard and spinach.(3) Quinoa is a broad-leafed plant that produces a small seed. It's a member of the Goosefoot family that is native to South America.(4) Quinoa is considered a complete protein that contains all nine of the essential amino acids necessary to human physiology, and it is the only plant-based source for these nutrients.(5) Quinoa cooks up like a grain, but it is actually a seed, and is an excellent source of protein for vegans and people following a gluten-free diet. According to the American Journal of Gastroenterology, it is also safe for celiac patients.(6) Like amaranth, quinoa can be ground into a flour and used in cooking or baking. Quinoa is rich in manganese which is vital to activating enzymes crucial to metabolizing carbohydrates and cholesterol. It is also essential to bone development. Quinoa is rich in lysine, an essential amino acid, and helps with the absorption of calcium and the production of collagen and is low on the glycemic index.(5) Both amaranth and quinoa are great gluten-free options, both as a flour or grain substitute, and have a nutty taste and texture. They readily absorb the flavors they are cooked with, but are also tasty on their own. They can be made hot or cold, combined with other foods, added to soups or baked goods, and made into hot porridge or cereal. They are both versatile, easy to work with, and have a high nutritional content. If you're looking for an easy, healthy, gluten-free option, why not try amaranth or quinoa? It's a staple in our home! References: www.wholegrainscouncil.org Vopr Pitan. 2014;83(1):67-73., Amaranth flour: characteristics, comparative analysis, application possibilities. Howard, B. C. (August 12, 2013), Amaranth, Another Ancient Wonder Food, But Who Will Eat It?, Retrieved from www.nationalgeographic.com. Laux, M. (June 2012). Iowa State University. Agricultural Marketing Resource Center. Retrieved from www.agmrc.org. Norek, Danna. (June 15, 2010), Quinoa Gives the Perfect Protein Source to Vegetarians and Vegans. Retrieved from www.naturalnews.com. Victor F Zevallos PhD1, L Irene Herencia PhD2, Fuju Chang MD, PhD3, Suzanne Donnelly PhD1, H Julia Ellis PhD1 and Paul J Ciclitira MD, PhD1 (January 21, 2-14). Gastrointestinal Effects of Eating Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) in Celiac Patients. Am J Gastroenterol 2014; 109:270–278.
  8. Celiac.com 10/22/2015 - Quinoa is one of those gluten-free grains that are packed with nutrients and fiber. But quinoa on its own can be a bit dull. This recipe features quinoa blended with garlic, onion, cumin, diced tomatoes spinach and beans, and stuffed into red bell peppers and roasted for a flavor-packed gluten-free vegetarian delight. Ingredients: 16 ounces diced tomatoes, drained, with juice reserved 1 cup chicken broth 3/4 cup quinoa 3 red bell peppers, sliced lengthwise 14 ounces canned black beans, rinsed and drained 6 ounces fresh spinach, or more to taste 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 onion, finely chopped 3 cloves minced garlic 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 teaspoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon ground black pepper ½ carrot, grated ½ cup shredded Mexican cheese blend Directions: Heat oven to 375 degrees F. Arrange bell peppers in greased baking dish. Roast peppers until tender, about 30 minutes. Heat olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add onion and stir until soft and clear. Add garlic, cumin, salt, and black pepper to onion; cook and stir about a minute, until fragrant. Add tomatoes, chicken broth, quinoa, and carrot into onion mixture. Cook about 10-12 minutes until quinoa is tender. Stir black beans and spinach into quinoa mixture. Add extra tomato juice if quinoa mixture is too dry. Spoon quinoa mixture into roasted red peppers and top with Mexican cheese blend. Bake in the oven until cheese is melted, about 15 minutes. Serve hot.
  9. My company cafeteria sometimes does a quinoa specialty station, with sauces and add-ins. I've had long talks with the manager there about my Celiac and they've been extremely accommodating - they were very pleased to tell me about this new option. We've discussed all the ingredients, and they have a separate prep area, so I felt quite confident about eating from this new station. But, I have to say that each of the three times I've had it, I've had kind of a 'rumbling' tummy afterward. I'd like to think it's not gluten, but maybe just more quinoa than I'm used to in one meal. Is it common to get a bit of a reaction from quinoa, that is not gluten-related? Or should I fear some sort of cross contamination? It's black quinoa if that makes a difference, and I eat plenty of quinoa otherwise, though maybe not this much at once. Thanks.
  10. Celiac.com 05/05/2015 - Avocado, beans and corn help to turn quinoa into a delicious, nutritious salad that is perfect as a side or as a potluck dish. Add a bit of cilantro, some lemon juice and a few spices, and you have a winner! I enjoy the salad as is, but sometimes I like to serve it with a light vinaigrette. It’s worth noting that this is one of those flexible salads that encourages substitution and variation. You can add thing like shrimp, or chicken. You can add things like carrots or cucumber. Ingredients: 1 cup uncooked quinoa, rinsed 1 cup canned sweet corn 8-10 cherry tomatoes, halved 2 cups canned black beans, rinsed and drained 1 avocado, peeled and diced ½ small red bell pepper, roasted or streamed and sliced ½ small yellow bell pepper, roasted or streamed and sliced ⅓-½ cup of fresh cilantro, chopped 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon fresh squeezed lime juice salt and ground black pepper to taste dash of Tajin to taste Directions: Cook quinoa as directed. Set aside and let cool. Whisk together olive oil, lime juice, salt and pepper. Add corn, avocado, peppers, tomatoes and black beans to quinoa. Gently stir in cilantro and lime juice mixture. You may add a light vinaigrette instead of lime juice, as desired. Chill for at least a half hour, top with a dash of Tajin, and serve.
  11. These savory muffins make the perfect dessert, or just have them for a snack! Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free and Vegetarian Ingredients: 1 cup uncooked quinoa 2 large eggs 1 cup Vidalia onions, finely chopped 1 cup dairy-free shredded mozzarella cheese 3 garlic cloves, minced 1/2 cup fresh cilantro, finely chopped 1/3 cup grape tomatoes, diced 1/2 tsp. sea salt 1/2 tsp. freshly ground pepper 1 tsp. chili powder 2 chives, finely chopped, for garnish 2 cups salsa, for serving Instructions: Cook quinoa according to package directions. Prepare muffin pan with nonstick baking spray. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. In a large bowl, combine cooked quinoa with remaining ingredients, except chives and salsa; mix well to combine. Transfer quinoa mixture to prepared muffin pan. Using a tablespoon, fill each muffin cup to the top, then using a spatula, press down on the mixture to create a flat surface. Bake for 20 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from oven; set aside to cool for 15 minutes. Using a teaspoon, gently remove quinoa muffins from the muffin cups. Transfer to a serving platter; serve with a sprinkle of fresh chives and a side of salsa for dipping. Enjoy!
  12. Celiac.com 01/01/2015 - I've been trying to eat more quinoa lately, and this recipe is easy to make, and delivers a tasty, nutritious dish that compliments most any entrée. Ingredients: 2 cups chicken broth 2 carrots, chopped 1 cup quinoa, rinsed 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 2 cloves garlic, minced ½ cup chopped onion ¾ cup slivered almonds ⅓ cup chopped fresh Italian parsley Directions: Heat oil in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Sauté onion in oil for 5 minutes, until translucent. Add garlic and carrot, and cook 3 minutes more. Stir in quinoa and chicken broth, and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, cover, and cook 15 to 20 minutes, or until quinoa is tender and fluffy. In a bowl, toss quinoa together with almonds and parsley. Serve hot or at room temperature.
  13. Celiac.com 08/03/2012 - Quinoa is a highly nutritious grain from the Andes, with low concentrations of prolamins. Even though it is regularly recommended as part of a gluten-free diet, few studies have been done, and there is scant data to support this recommendation. A team of researchers recently evaluated quinoa together with millet, sorghum and wheat. The research team included Victor F. Zevallos, H. Julia Ellis, Tanja Šuligoj, L. Irene Herencia, and Paul J. Ciclitira. They are affiliated with the Division of Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, Department of Gastroenterology at King's College London, United Kingdom, and the Departamento de Producción Vegetal at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, in Spain. The study was supported by the Food Standards Agency PG1017 of the Clinical Research Trust, and the European Commission QLK1-CT-2002-02077. The team wanted to determine the amount of celiac-toxic prolamin epitopes in various quinoa strains from different regions of the Andes, along with the ability of these epitopes to trigger immune responses in patients with celiac disease. For their test, the team used 15 cultivars of quinoa provided by Irene Herencia in coordination with the germoplasm bank at INIA Peru, millet and sorghum provided by F Janssen of the regional food inspection service in Zuppen, Netherlands, and peptic/tryptic digested wheat gliadin donated by Herbert Wieser German Institute for Food Chemistry in Garching, Germany. They measured the concentration of celiac-toxic epitopes using murine monoclonal antibodies against gliadin and high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits. To assess immune response, they conducted proliferation assays of celiac small intestinal T cells/interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and production of IFN-γ/IL-15 after organ culture of celiac duodenal biopsy samples. Of the fifteen quinoa strains tested, the researchers found that four strains had measurable concentrations of celiac-toxic epitopes, but that these levels were below the maximum permitted for a gluten-free food. Notably, the Ayacuchana and Pasankalla strains triggered T cells at levels similar to those for gliadin and caused secretion of cytokines from cultured biopsy samples at levels comparable with those for gliadin. The end result was that most quinoa strains are safe for celiacs, and do not possess measurable amounts of celiac-toxic epitopes. However, 2 strains do contain celiac-toxic proteins that might trigger adverse immune responses in some patients with celiac disease. Because so many people with celiac disease turn to quinoa as an important source of nutrients, more study is needed to determine if all strains are safe, or if certain strains need to be avoided. Source: American Society for Nutrition
  14. You may have caught my enthusiastic review of Attune Foods Erewhon Buckwheat & Hemp cereal from last year. Well, it's time I inform you that they've done it again: Attune Foods Erewhon Quinoa & Chia gluten-free cereal is a great way to add two superfoods to your diet, and makes a tasty corn flakes alternative. Like all their cereals, Attune Foods has done a great job of maximizing health benefits and keeping the ingredients list rich with wholesome ingredients, while still delivering a tasty product that isn't a pain to eat. This cereal is similar to corn flakes, but not quite as flaky: it's a little tougher and chewier, and holds up to milk better. Health reasons aside, I actually prefer it to corn flakes, as it doesn't turn into a mushy mess in 5 minutes! Attune Foods Erewhon Quinoa & Chia cereal is great for you, and should make a welcome addition to any gluten-free household's breakfast reserves. You can find it (exclusively) at Whole Foods. For more information, visit their website. Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
  15. This tomato soup is loaded with veggies and is delicious sprinkled with Parmesan cheese. Ingredients: 3-4 Tbsp. butter 2 medium onions, chopped 1/2 large carrot, chopped 1 tsp. minced garlic 2 28 oz. cans diced tomatoes, rinsed and drained 2 cups vegetable broth 1/4 cup uncooked gluten free quinoa, thoroughly rinsed 1 tsp. dried basil 1 tsp. dried oregano 1/3 cup fresh or frozen kale or spinach 1/2 to 2/3 cup milk 2/3 cup shredded fresh Parmesan Directions: Melt the butter in a large pan on medium heat. Add the onions, carrots, and garlic, and cook for about 5 minutes, until the onions and carrots are beginning to get tender. Add the tomatoes, vegetable broth, quinoa, basil, and oregano. Simmer 10 minutes. Turn the heat down to low, then add the kale or spinach. Cook another 2 or 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the milk, and simmer gently for about 5 minutes more. Using an immersion blender, puree until smooth, or transfer the soup in batches to a blender. It can also be left chunky. Ladle into bowls, and serve with the Parmesan.
  16. Celiac.com 02/26/2014 - Quinoa is a highly nutritious plant from the South America that is often recommended by doctors as part of a gluten-free diet. However, some laboratory data suggests that quinoa prolamins can trigger innate and adaptive immune responses in celiac patients, and thus might not be safe for celiacs to eat. To better examine this issue, a team of researchers set out to evaluate the real-life effects of quinoa consumption in adult patients with celiac disease. The research team included Alberto Caminero, Alexandra R. Herrán, Esther Nistal, Jenifer Pérez-Andrés, Luis Vaquero, Santiago Vivas, José María G. Ruiz de Morales, Silvia M. Albillos, and Javier Casqueiro. They are variously affiliated with the Instituto de Biología Molecular, Genómica y Proteómica (INBIOMIC), and the Instituto de Biomedicina (IBIOMED) Campus de Vegazana at the Universidad de León, the Área de Microbiología, Facultad de Biología y Ciencias Ambientales at the Universidad de León, the Departamento de Inmunología y Gastroenterología of the Hospital de León, and the Instituto de Biotecnología (INBIOTEC) de León, all in León, Spain. The researchers looked at 19 treated celiac patients who ate 50 g of quinoa every day for 6 weeks as part of their regular gluten-free diet. The team evaluated diet, serology, and gastrointestinal parameters, and made histological assessments of 10 patients, bot before and after they consumed quinoa. The team found normal gastrointestinal parameters. They also noticed that the ratio of villus height to crypt depth improved from slightly below normal values (2.8:1) to normal levels (3:1), surface-enterocyte cell height improved from 28.76 to 29.77 μm and the number of intra-epithelial lymphocytes per 100 enterocytes decreased from 30.3 to 29.7. Results for all the blood tests remained within normal ranges, although total cholesterol (n=19) decreased from 4.6 to 4.3 mmol/l, low-density lipoprotein decreased from 2.46 to 2.45 mmol/l, high-density lipoprotein decreased from 1.8 to 1.68 mmol/l and triglycerides decreased from 0.80 to 0.79 mmol/l. The results show that quinoa is well tolerated by celiac patients and does not worsen the condition. In fact, patients saw a general improvement histological and serological results, along with a mild reduction in blood pressure. Overall, this is the first clinical data to indicate that celiac patients can safely tolerate up to 50 g of quinoa daily for 6 weeks. However, the team points out the need for further studies to determine the long-term effects of quinoa consumption. Source: Am J Gastroenterol. 2014 Feb;109(2):270-8. doi: 10.1038/ajg.2013.431. Epub 2014 Jan 21.
  17. I am so sad! I was diagnosed in March 2013 and purchased some gluten-free (certified) quinoa for breakfast porridge. I had not had any in a long time. I reacted to the quinoa just as I would to gluten (pain in my actual stomach, rock feeling in stomach, body aches, irritability, etc.). I figured that it was just too soon after my diagnosis and I put it away in my freezer for a later time. I made my yummy banana, cocoa, honey, vanilla porridge last week. Felt a bit of twinge, but nothing significant. Made it again yesterday and I have sharp stomach pains, body aches -- the works! I know that quinoa is a safe gluten free alternative, but I guess I have an intolerance to it. I am frustrated because I known for years (more than 15) that I have allergies and intolerances to milk, eggs, mushrooms, garlic and nuts. I am tired of food intolerances!!!! I will now give away my quinoa and stick to brown rice porridge when it's cold outside. Does anyone else react to it? I'm sure that my pot and the other porridge ingredients are all gluten free and there's no chance of cross contamination in my kitchen.
  18. Hi everyone, I've been strictly gluten free for about 1 year. I do not have diagnosed celiac disease but I know I was very sick before I cut it out. When I went gluten free I noticed I felt much better but about 3 months in noticed a soy intolerance. Then came lactose then casein and most recently chicken, potato, Certified gluten-free oats, quinoa and corn. Corn has been the bane of my existence. I can not tolerate even distilled white vinegar (derived from corn). That said, I feel so much better. Normal and healthy most of the time. I am shocked and amazed by how healthy and happy I feel after having years of debilitating migraines, IBS, and neuropathy. These foods gone, I feel great! So, I am by no means complaining but seriously....did anyone ever get their foods back? Obviously gluten is NEVER reintroduced. But I do miss potato. I miss soy (tamari please!). I realllllly miss cheese! I know one year is not that long for healing but I have to ask, have you been able to reintroduce your intolerances? How long did it take for you? Also, for those of you with other grain intolerances, ever reintroduce those? I am really curious as to other grain intolerances like corn. Would be nice not to worry about salt (iodized table salt has corn as a binding agent). Thanks everyone!
  19. Celiac.com 07/02/2013 - This wonderful stuffed mushroom recipe makes a perfect appetizer for that perfect dinner experience! Makes 16 Mushrooms Ingredients: 1/4 cup uncooked quinoa 16 large button mushrooms 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 tablespoons finely chopped pecans 1 cup salsa 1 cup Go Veggie! Vegan Cheddar Cheese Shreds 2 Tbsp. Go Veggie! Vegan Parmesan, plus more for topping 1 teaspoon sea salt 2 Tbsp. finely chopped flat leaf fresh parsley Directions: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Cook quinoa according to package directions. Remove stems from mushrooms and set aside. Place mushrooms on a nonstick baking sheet. Bake for 15 minutes. Meanwhile, chop mushroom stems into small pieces. In a large skillet, heat oil and garlic with chopped mushroom stems over medium heat for 4 minutes or until garlic starts to brown. Add pecans, salsa, Go Veggie Cheddar Cheese Shreds, Go Veggie Parmesan and sea salt; cook for 3 more minutes. Add cooked quinoa and continue to cook, gently stirring for another 3 minutes. Remove from heat; transfer mixture to empty mushroom caps. Top with parsley and bake for 10 minutes. Remove from oven; transfer to a serving plate. Serve warm with additional Parmesan cheese. Enjoy!
  20. If you follow health food trends, chances are that you've heard of the superfood pseudograin, quinoa. It is nutrient-rich, packs a complete protein, is high in fiber, etc. etc. The bottom line is that you should probably be trying to come up with a way to integrate quinoa into your diet, whether gluten-free or not. Nuwi offers an easy solution with their gluten-free quinoa smoothie with banana, which is not only gluten-free, but lactose-free with no sugar added as well. These smoothies are a great way to take your quinoa on the go, and they actually retain that fresh-blended smoothie quality, even though they're totally shelf-stable. They're relatively light on sugar, and pack 3g of fiber and 3g of complete protein in one tiny 10 oz., 160 calorie bottle. They're worth a try, especially if you've been looking for a way to up your quinoa intake. For more information visit their site. Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
  21. HI there, I'm new to this board and I would like to start by saying that I have not been diagnosed with Celiac (neither has it been ruled out). I was referred to this site for the rich resources available about eating gluten free and as a support network with others dealing with the difficulty of living with the daily problems of living with such restrictions. I have, however, been diagnosed with Eosinophilic Esophagitis. Symptoms including, tightening of the airway, dysphagia, choking, gastrointestinal distress. I also had a rash that started around the same time these symptoms began. On and off, I couldn't correlate it to anything. I started with an upper gi. My physician said that if I wanted, before he did a scope, I could try an elimination diet. So for several weeks I went off of dairy, wheat, soy, nuts, seafood and eggs. (and I do mean religiously. I did not 'cheat' and read every package on every thing, nor did I eat out for fear of the unknown) I started adding these back into my diet slowly and watching for response. Everything was added back into my diet without issue. Shortly before I got to the last thing on the list, wheat, I had buckwheat with dinner. I had a reaction. I thought it was supposed to be safe! Then I tried quinoa. same issue. Then teff and millet. Issues there too. I still have yet to try wheat, but I fear the worst. When I was tested for allergy to wheat, it came back clear, but my physician said that I could have an intolerance which isn't the same as an allergy. I have no problem with rice or seeds. My question is, have any of you experienced this sort of issue? I am curious because I thought out of all those things I should be able to find an alternative to wheat. I have been using rice flour and chickpea, but I am having difficulty finding too much on the internet about intolerances or allergies with these grain substitutions. Any ideas or info would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
  22. This recipe makes an outstanding gluten-free and vegetarian main dish that is very hearty! Gluten-Free and Vegetarian Ingredients: 1 cup sesame seeds 1 large bunch of fresh kale, finely chopped 2 tsp. olive oil 1/2 cup Vidallia onion, diced 2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced 1 Tbsp. dried thyme 1/4 tsp. chili powder 2 cups cooked quinoa (about 1 cup uncooked quinoa) 1 cup Greek plain yogurt 2 large eggs, lightly beaten ¾ tsp. sea salt ½ tsp. freshly ground white pepper Instructions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Coat an 8 x 8-inch baking dish with cooking spray, then coat with sesame seeds. Fill a large bowl with ice and water; set aside. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add kale; blanch until bright green, approximately 8-10 seconds. Transfer hot spinach to the ice bath to cool for 30 seconds, remove and drain water. Set aside kale on a paper towel. Heat olive oil in a medium skillet. Add Vidallia onion, garlic, thyme and chili powder; sauté until translucent, approximately 8-10 minutes. Remove from heat; transfer to a medium-sized bowl. Add kale, cooked quinoa, yogurt, eggs, sea salt and pepper to the onion mixture; mix well to combine. Transfer quinoa mixture into the prepared baking dish and place in the oven. Bake until set and golden brown, approximately 60 minutes. Remove from oven. Slice and serve warm or at room temperature with a dollop of Greek plain yogurt for dipping, if desired. Enjoy!
  23. This wonderful soup can be served with your favorite meal, or as a stand-alone snack. This vegan and chilled soup is perfect for a Spring day! Ingredients: 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 cups green beans, trimmed and steamed 1 cup fresh baby spinach 1 cup quinoa, cooked Juice of 1 large orange 1 tsp. ground cumin 1 tsp. chili powder 1 Tbsp. freshly ground orange zest 1 large heirloom tomato, diced 1 zucchini, sliced 1 very ripe avocado, peeled and pitted ½ tsp. red pepper flakes 1/4 cup fresh basil, chopped 2 Tbsp. Barlean’s Flax Seeds Pinch of sea salt and freshly ground pepper Directions: Combine all ingredients in a food processor; pulse until mixture forms a smooth consistency. Transfer to a large bowl. Place into the refrigerator, covered for 1 hour to chill. Serve cool or at room temperature. Enjoy!
  24. The warmer months provide a steady demand for light, easy salads. Quinoa is one of those great foods that taste great warm or cold and holds up well against the other unique flavors in this salad. This great summertime salad offers a fresh and tangy alternative to more traditional pasta salads, with just a hint of sophistication. It's a great dish for picnics, potlucks and your own kitchen table. Ingredients: 1 cup quinoa 3 large celery stalks, thinly sliced 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved 3-4 radishes, thinly sliced ½ red onion, diced ¼ cup fresh dill, chopped 1 cup crumbled feta cheese ¼ cup balsamic vinegar ½ cup olive oil 2 cups water Salt and pepper to taste Directions: Bring a pot of salted water to a boil and add quinoa. Cook until fluffy, about 12-15 minutes and transfer to a serving bowl. Stir in celery, tomatoes, radishes, and onions. In a small bowl, whisk together oil and vinegar. Pour over salad toss lightly to coat. Fold in cheese and season with salt and pepper. Garnish with a sprinkle of dill.
  25. This is a wonderfully sweet way to prepare scallops. The integrity of the scallops is well-maintained by giving them a light sear on each side, allowing them to hold their own against the tangy citrus sauce. This is a dish that utilizes both the juice and the zest of the fruit along with the savory aroma of the cider and coriander which work synchronously to create powerful dimension in the mouth. Because the quinoa cooks on its own, this recipe does not take long and makes for a beautiful presentation. Ingredients: 1 ½ pounds sea scallops 4 tangerines 2 oranges 1 small lemon 1 cup quinoa, rinsed 2 ¼ cups water 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar 1 ½ teaspoons toasted coriander seeds, crushed 3 tablespoons melted butter 2 tablespoons sugar 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 tablespoon fresh chives, chopped 1 ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon pepper Preparation: Season water with ½ teaspoon salt in a medium saucepan and add quinoa. Bring to a rapid boil and then reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered until the water is fully absorbed, up to 15 minutes. Fluff with a fork. While quinoa is cooking, grate 1 teaspoon of orange and lemon zest. Juice all the fruits into a bowl. Heat sugar in a skillet over medium heat until it turns a tawny-amber color. Remove from heat and whisk in vinegar, juices, zest and coriander. Return to heat and bring to a boil. Cook until sauce thickens and becomes syrupy, 8-10 minutes. Remove from heat and whisk in butter. Keep warm. Heat olive oil in a large skillet. Sprinkle scallops with remaining salt and pepper. Add scallops to skillet and sear first side until golden in color, about 4 minutes. Flip once and cook the other side for 2-3 more minutes. Serve scallops over a bed of quinoa and finish with a drizzle of the warm citrus sauce.
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