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Found 25 results

  1. In my house, fall and winter cooking means lots of stews, soups and casseroles. Beef stew is one of my true favorites, and one that I can almost never order at a restaurant, because it almost always contains wheat, either as a thickener, or to dredge the meat for browning. Beef stew is a dish that goes well by itself, or which can be served over rice or gluten-free noodles for a heartier meal. Here is a recipe that will deliver a delicious gluten-free stew that will keep your hungry eaters coming back for more. Ingredients: 2 pounds stew beef 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 cups water 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1 gluten-free beef bouillon cube (I often use Celifibr's Vegetarian) 5 tablespoons Just Like Lipton's Gluten-Free Soup Mix (Recipe below) 3 whole cloves garlic, peeled 2 bay leaves 1 large onion, sliced 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon pepper ½ teaspoon paprika ¼ teaspoon ground allspice 4-5 large carrots, sliced 3-4 potatoes, cubed 3 celery stalks, chopped 2 tablespoons cornstarch Directions: Heat oil in a large stew pot. Stir in meat and cook lightly until meat browns. Add water, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, bay leaves, onion, salt, sugar, pepper, paprika, soup mix, bouillon cube, and allspice. Cover and simmer on low heat for 1½ hours. Remove bay leaves and garlic cloves. Add potatoes, carrots and celery. Cover and cook another 30 to 40 minutes. To thicken gravy, get a large bowl, and mix ¼ cup water and the cornstarch until smooth. Slowly whisk in 2 cups of liquid from the stew pot. Slowly stir mixture into the stew pot. Stir and cook until it reaches desired thickness. Gluten-free Dry Onion Soup Mix Ingredients: 1½ cups dried minced onion ¼ cup beef bouillon powder (gluten-free) 2½ tablespoons onion powder ½ teaspoon crushed celery seed ½ teaspoon sugar Directions: Combine all ingredients and store in an airtight container. About 5 tablespoons equals a single 1¼-ounce package of Lipton's mix.
  2. Celiac.com 10/18/2013 - Buckwheat, sometimes referred to as kasha, is often billed as a “tasty alternative to wheat.” That’s all well and good, but is it really gluten-free, and generally considered safe to eat for those who suffer from celiac disease or a gluten sensitivity? Whether or not buckwheat is tasty is a matter of opinion. However, with so much conflicting information available today, it can be hard to tell what’s gluten-free and what isn’t. Here’s the skinny on buckwheat. The Facts Good news! With its non-wheat status, buckwheat is safely gluten-free. Buckwheat and wheat are, come to find out, actually from completely different botanical families. Derived from the seeds of a flowering plant, buckwheat is not considered a grain or a cereal (though it may be called a pseudo-cereal—don’t let that scare you). Buckwheat, in all of its gluten-free glory, is actually closely related to rhubarb. In addition, it is an excellent source of fiber and nutrients. In particular, buckwheat groats (the small, triangular seeds), when cooked, offer 17 grams of dietary fiber or 68% of the daily requirement for a 2,000 calorie per day diet, as well as 22 grams of protein. Nutritionally beneficial and sometimes used in treating symptoms of type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, buckwheat contains rutin. Rutin, a glycoside, has been known to strengthen capillary walls and improve circulation. Like many grains, buckwheat can sometimes be cross-contaminated with wheat during processing, transportation or if it is used as a rotational crop with wheat, so it is important to find non-cross contaminated source of buckwheat—make sure the one you use is certified gluten-free. Culinary Uses Buckwheat groats make a healthy side dish. Also, if you grind the small seeds of the buckwheat plant, you can make buckwheat flour for use in noodles, crepes, and many other gluten-free products. Using buckwheat flour in your cooking will give a strong nut taste to your dishes. You can also contribute raw buckwheat groats to recipes for cookies, cakes, granola, crackers, or any other gluten-free, bread-like item. If you’re feeling more creative, buckwheat makes a good binding agent, and becomes very gelatinous when soaked. If you soak, rinse, and then re-dry the groats you can produce a sort of buckwheat chip that is crunchy and can act as a nice side dish. When toasted, buckwheat becomes kasha. You can pick out kasha—vs. raw buckwheat—by the color; it’s a darker reddish-brown. In addition, kasha has a strong toasted-nut scent. Conversely, raw buckwheat groats are typically light brown or green and have no aroma. Buckwheat So, there you have it. You can use buckwheat and kasha safely as a nutritional, gluten-free alternative to wheat, or to create fun and tasty side dishes with buckwheat groats. If you’re looking to stock your pantry with all kinds of gluten-free wheat alternatives for your side dishes or even your main dishes, you can safely go for buckwheat in addition to cornmeal, millet, amaranth, cornstarch, garbanzo beans, arrowroot, quinoa or brown rice. Eating a gluten-free diet doesn’t mean you have to rely on the same old wheat alternative for every dish!
  3. Celiac.com 10/26/2016 - There's been a bit of confusion lately over claims by the Canadian Celiac Association (CCA) that the optical sorting system used by General Mills to produce gluten-free Cheerios and other cereals is somehow flawed, and their products not safe for people with celiac disease. The CCA has issued a warning to Canadian consumers with celiac disease against eating gluten-free Cheerios products, based on concerns of possible contamination due to a what they say is a faulty sorting process. General Mills debuted their patented optical sorting process and launched gluten-free Cheerios in the U.S. last summer, and they spent millions of dollars developing the new technology. Later, the company voluntarily recalled nearly 2 million boxes, when a plant mixing error caused wheat flour to mixed with oat flour. However, since that time there have been no known reports of systemic contamination, which is what the CCA is alleging. General Mills launched five flavors of gluten-free Cheerios in Canada this summer: Original, Honey Nut, Multi-Grain, Apple Cinnamon and Chocolate. Clearly, the CCA is looking to protect people with celiac disease from the perceived possibility of gluten contamination, but the CCA's statement goes beyond urging simple caution, and urging celiacs to report any cases of gluten contamination and to save boxes for lab testing. "Hearing stories…" Samantha Maloney, former president of the Ottawa chapter of the Canadian Celiac Association, told CBC Radio's All In A Day that the General Mills process of sorting grains to produce gluten-free cereal is "flawed." She and her group claim that they have made the claim because they have "heard stories." Has Maloney or anyone in her group actually followed up on these claims, these "stories" she's "hearing?" Without offering any proof or names, or scientific data for making her claim, Maloney went on to say that General Mills is having "a bit of a problem" with the way they are cleaning their oats. Is she saying that the product is being contaminated by gluten? It seems so. Well, if that's true, then surely some celiac suffer who ate Cheerios and had a bad reaction must have a box of cereal that can be tested. If General Mills is churning out box after box of gluten-tainted cereal and labeling it "gluten-free," then it seems like a massive scandal and lawsuit waiting to happen. Maybe some enterprising person, or even a law firm, can go grab some boxes and get them tested, and add some actual evidence to these claims. One would think Maloney and the CCA would confirm such information beforehand, rather than first making the claim, and then asking people to provide confirmation after the fact. If Maloney's claims are proven true, then General Mills deserves to be called out, and Celiac.com will certainly be among the first to report it. Until then, saying that General Mills is knowingly using a faulty system to sort their gluten-free oats is simply irresponsible hearsay, and doesn't really help provide accurate information for consumers with celiac disease, something the Canadian Celiac Association claims is part of its mission. It's one thing to urge caution, and to call for testing and evidence gathering that supports any claims of gluten-contamination, but it's entirely another to claim without any evidence a product and process are flawed and likely to harm people with celiac disease. What happens if the General Mills process turns out to be okay? What happens if Gluten-Free Cheerios and other products are perfectly safe? That means the CCA was not only wrong, they were wrong without even having any facts to support their original claim. How does that help people with celiac disease or the CCA? Celiac.com continues to support efforts by the CCA and other groups to inform and protect people with celiac disease, but we also urge proper facts, data, context and evidence to support any hard claims about products, gluten-free or otherwise. Regarding the status of General Mills' patented optical sorting process for producing gluten-free grains for their Cheerios and other gluten-free products, Celiac.com urges caution on the part of individual consumers. Currently there is no evidence to suggest that any of these products not gluten-free, but, there is also no evidence that similar gluten-free oat cereals made by smaller companies do a better job to ensure that their products are safe, yet there is no controversy about them. Ultimately people with celiac disease should use caution, and, in the event they experience gluten contamination, they should save the box and report it to the Canadian Celiac Association, and/ or any of the other official resources listed on the CCA website: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (all provinces except Quebec) MAPAQ (Quebec only) General Mills Customer Service In the USA, the FDA. Stay tuned to celiac.com for information on this and related stories.
  4. Jefferson Adams

    Gluten in Meth? Really?

    Celiac.com 11/25/2016 - First of all, if you are using methamphetamine, gluten is probably the least of your worries. Seriously. But what about rumors and articles circulating that suggest that meth contains gluten, and that said gluten might make an already dangerous drug much word for people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance? Is there really gluten in meth? The short answer is no, gluten in meth is not a thing. Meth does not contain gluten. To the best of our knowledge this latest bit of misinformation comes from an article published in the ThatOregonLife.com, and constitutes an attempt at humor. According to the article, "Health experts have today warned that meth found on the streets of Portland has tested positive for gluten, a protein composite normally found in several types of grains, including wheat, spelt, rye, and barley." The article goes on to say that a group called Action on Gluten is working to eliminate gluten from meth within a year. According to the article, the group's spokesperson, Simon Krueger explained that "Gluten is not only dangerous, but also highly addictive. When added to meth, an otherwise fairly safe drug, the consequences can be deadly." What some readers may fail to notice, however, is that the article appears in the magazine's "Satire" section, and is undoubtedly tongue in cheek. The article appears alongside other obviously satirical articles, such as one claiming that President-elect Donald Trump has recently announced his plans to build a marijuana-themed hotel in notorious hippy enclave of Eugene, Oregon. So, anyone who actually believes meth contains gluten can credit their misconception ThatOregonLife.com. Once again, as a public service announcement. People should absolutely not use meth, but meth certainly does not contain gluten.
  5. Celiac.com 09/23/2016 - Good hummus makes the perfect dish for a potluck or barbecue. Cheap and easy to make, hummus is sure to please and quick to disappear. This recipe delivers a tasty hummus that is sure to be a big hit at your next food fest. Ingredients: 2 (15-1/2 oz.) cans chickpeas, aka garbanzo beans 3 cloves garlic, roughly chopped ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice, from 3 lemons ¼ cup sesame tahini, well stirred ¼ teaspoon cumin 1 teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling Dash of paprika, as garnish (optional) Directions: Reserving the liquid from the can, strain the chick peas. Set a few chickpeas aside for garnish. In the bowl of a food processor fitted with metal blade, combine the chickpeas, ⅓ cup reserved canning liquid, lemon juice, tahini, garlic, cumin, salt and olive oil. Process for several minutes until smooth and creamy. The hummus should be smooth and creamy, but still hold its shape; stir in more liquid if it's too thick. Taste and add more lemon and seasoning if desired. Transfer mixture to a serving dish. Use a spoon to make a shallow well in the center. Drizzle olive oil in the well, and sprinkle with paprika. Serve at room temperature.
  6. Celiac.com 08/31/2016 - Oats are traditionally one of the more commonly contaminated gluten-free grains on the market. According to Gluten Free Watchdog, "gluten-free" foods made with oat ingredients are more commonly contaminated than foods made with other "gluten-free" grains. In light of their survey results, people with a high sensitivity to gluten might want to consider taking some extra steps to make sure their oats are truly gluten-free. The solution? Know your oats! To be sure that your oats are safe, Gluten Free Watchdog recommends following these easy extra steps: 1) Make sure you are sourcing oats from a supplier of purity protocol oats, such as gluten-free Harvest, Avena, or Montana Gluten-Free. Currently, Gluten Free Watchdog does not recommend any of the commercial suppliers of mechanically and optically sorted oats, such as Grain Millers or LaCrosse Milling. 2) Ask for test results. Regardless of where you source oats, ask your supplier to provide you with test results, including how frequently oats are tested and what assay is used for testing. 3) Test the oats yourself. There is no such thing as too much testing. If you really want to be sure, you can send samples of oats to a third party lab for testing using the sandwich R5 ELISA and cocktail extraction. Labs include Bia Diagnostics and FARRP. Read more at Gluten Free Watchdog.
  7. Like many folks, fried rice was one of the first Asian dishes I learned to love as a child. Something about the savory steaming fluffy rice, the tiny peas and carrots, the bits of egg, the meat or, my preference, the shrimp coming together to create a tasty dish that continues please me to this day. Like many folks, when I went gluten-free, I gave up soy sauce just to be safe. Even though much evidence suggests that soy sauce is safe for people on a gluten-free diet, I have kind of stuck to my old ways and generally avoid soy sauce unless I can be sure it is gluten-free. This means that I have occasionally had to forgo this favorite when ordering Chinese food. Below is a recipe for a delicious, restaurant-style gluten-free fried rice that will put smiles on the faces of your lucky eaters. Ingredients: 3 cups cold cooked rice, (Ideally, a medium grained rice that is not too sticky) 1 tablespoon water 1 tablespoon butter ½ cup chopped carrots ½ cup frozen green peas, thawed 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 4 green onions, chopped 3 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped 2 eggs, lightly beaten 1½ cups fresh bean sprouts ½ cup celery, chopped (optional) 1 tablespoon gluten-free soy sauce, plus more for seasoning 3 drops sesame oil (optional, but recommended) 4 ounces cooked lean boneless pork, ham, chicken and/or beef, chopped (as desired) 6-8 shrimp, cleaned, shelled and deveined 1 tablespoon rice wine or 1 tablespoon dry sherry Directions: Heat butter and 1 tablespoon of oil in wok. Add chopped onions and stir-fry until onions turn a nice brown color, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic in the last 2 minutes of cooking. Allow wok to cool slightly. Mix egg with 3 drops of soy and 3 drops of sesame oil; set aside. Add ½ tbsp oil to wok, and swirl to coat the cooking surface; Add the egg mixture and swirl quickly until the egg until egg sets against wok; when egg puffs, flip egg and cook other side briefly. Remove the egg from wok, and chop into small pieces. Heat 1 tbsp oil in wok; add selected meat or shrimp to wok, along with carrots, peas, cooked green onion and garlic; stir-fry for 2 minutes. Feel free to add chopped cabbage, broccoli, Chinese greens, or bok choy, along with the shrimp, ham, etc., and the peas. Add rice, green onions, and bean sprouts, and rice wine, tossing to mix well, and stir-fry for 3 minutes. Add 2 tbsp of gluten-free soy sauce and chopped egg to rice mixture and fold in; stir-fry for 1 minute more. Serve.
  8. Shepherd's pie is one of my favorite comfort foods. It brings together meat, potatoes cheese and veggies for a simple, satisfying meal that will also help to warm up the house on a cool day. Here is a recipe for a delicious, gluten-free shepherd's pie that is quick, easy to make, and sure to please most meat and potato lovers. Ingredients: 1½ pounds lean ground beef 6 large potatoes, peeled and cubed 1 medium onion, chopped ¼ cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese 4 carrots, peeled and chopped 1 (14.5 oz) can Fire Roasted Diced Tomatoes, drained 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 cup frozen peas, thawed ½ cup whole milk 1 cup gluten-free chicken or beef broth 1 teaspoon chopped fresh or dry rosemary 1 teaspoon chopped fresh or dry thyme 1 tablespoon chopped Italian parsley 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 1 tablespoon tomato paste 2 tablespoons potato flour (other other gluten-free flour) 4 tablespoons butter, unsalted 2 tablespoons sour cream Directions: Heat oven to 375°F. In a large pot of salted water, boil potatoes and cook until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain potatoes and mash with butter, milk and sour cream. Season with salt and pepper to taste; set aside. Heat oil in a large sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the onions, carrots, and beef. Cook until browned, 8 to 10 minutes. Drain away the fat and add the broth, vinegar, tomato paste, diced tomatoes, and herbs. Simmer about 10 minutes, strain away any excess liquid, mix in the flour, and then add the peas. Mix well. Pour the mixture into a large glass baking dish. Spread potatoes over the meat mixture, then crosshatch the top with a fork. Top with cheddar cheese. Bake until golden brown on top, 30 to 35 minutes.
  9. Lasagna has long been one of my favorite dishes. I can still remember the joy and anticipation that filled me as my mom pulled a large pan of lasagna out of the oven, and the torture of waiting for it to cool until my brother and I could dig in. Once I went gluten-free, lasagna was one of those dishes that seemed to fall by the wayside. I rarely made it myself, and never ordered it out, as I couldn't eat the rich, egg noodles that anchored the dish. Recently, I began to miss lasagna, and decided to come up with a good, solid recipe for gluten-free lasagna to broaden my usual offerings of gluten-free pasta. Below is a recipe that foots the bill. A rich, delicious gluten-free lasagna that uses pork and beef, along with sour cream, ricotta, mozzarella and Romano cheeses to deliver a hearty, flavor-filled meal. Ingredients: 1 package gluten-free lasagna noodles (8 ounce) ½ pound ground pork sausage, mild ½ pound ground beef ½ pound ground veal (optional) 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 medium onion, diced 1 can diced tomatoes (28 ounce) 1 can tomato paste (6 ounce) 2 teaspoons dried parsley 1 teaspoon dried basil 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 pinch white sugar 8 ounces sour cream 8 ounces of ricotta cheese 3 eggs, lightly beaten 1¼ pounds shredded mozzarella cheese, divided 1 cup grated pecorino Romano cheese 2 teaspoons salt ½ teaspoon ground black pepper Makes 1 - 9x13 inch pan Directions: Heat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C). In boiling water topped with a bit of olive oil, cook lasagna noodles to a firm al dente, according to instructions. Remember that the noodles will cook more in the oven later, so do not overcook them. I like to add a splash of olive oil to the noodles, so they don't stick. *Note: I prefer BiAglut noodles, but you can use whatever kind you prefer. Heat a large skillet to medium-high and cook the onions until clear. Add sausage, ground beef, and garlic cook until the meat is crumbly, evenly browned. Drain off excess grease. Stir in the diced tomatoes, tomato paste, parsley, basil, oregano, and sugar. Increase heat and bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to low, and simmer for about 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the sauce is thickened. In a large bowl, mix together the eggs, sour cream, ricotta, Romano cheese, salt, black pepper, and half of the mozzarella cheese. To assemble the lasagna, spread a thin layer of the cooked sauce evenly over the bottom of a 9x13 inch baking pan. Cover with ⅓ of the lasagna noodles, ⅓ of the remaining cooked sauce, ⅓ of the sour cream mixture. Repeat this layering 2 more times. Sprinkle the remaining mozzarella cheese evenly over top of the lasagna. Bake about 30 minutes at 375 degrees F (190 degrees C) until the sauce is bubbly and the cheese is melted and golden brown.
  10. Celiac.com 05/29/2015 - On Thursday, May 7, Dateline featured Tom Brokaw's journey with multiple myeloma, a serious blood malignancy that develops in bone marrow. Now an author of a recent book on gluten and health is saying that Brokaw's cancer may be linked to adverse gluten reactions. Numerous cancers, including non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, throat/esophageal, stomach/intestinal/colon, and multiple myeloma are now being connected to gluten consumption, says Anne Sarkisian, author of "Toxic Staple: How Gluten May Be Wrecking Your Health — And What You Can Do About It!!"Â Scientific research suggests that multiple myeloma may be linked to gluten, says Sarkisian, "and thousands of scientific studies from around the world link gluten to over 300 symptoms, diseases, and associated conditions."Â "Early detection of celiac disease is vital to reducing complications such as lymphoma and many other cancers and diseases. Does this mean a gluten-free lifestyle is preventative medicine? More alternative medical experts advocate this approach,"Â says Sarkisian. Could Brokaw's multiple myeloma be related to gluten? Possibly. Sarkisian's claim sounds good, and may be true, but, at the end of the day, there's just no way to know for sure. It is true that early detection of celiac disease is vital to reducing complications such as lymphoma and many other cancers and diseases, and it is also true, as Sarkisian asserts, that "More alternative medical experts advocate this approach [a gluten-free diet],"Â for many people without celiac disease. Source: http://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp?aId=197635
  11. Celiac.com 05/26/2015 - If recent reports are any indication, the University of Washington's PR team might be getting ahead of the facts with claims that the university research team is close to developing a cure for celiac disease. Numerous articles are claiming that UW researchers are working to develop an enzyme-laden pill that would break down gluten in the stomach, thus permitting people with celiac disease to eat wheat. Hence, the 'cure' idea. The enzyme, it is said, would break it apart into amino acids that could be absorbed with no risk of adverse reaction for people with celiac disease. Well, an enzyme that breaks down gluten is not necessarily the same thing as a 'cure' for celiac disease. Ingrid Swanson Pultz, who leads the research project describes the substance as a protein that people with celiac disease will consume orally. The team is looking to begin FDA mandated tests and human trials will sometime in the next two years. The drug "really stands to make an impact on people's lives," Pultz said. However, UW is not the only institution working on drugs to treat celiac disease. There are several drug treatments in progress. It's unclear at present, and will remain unclear until the human trial phase whether the enzyme will permit safe gluten consumption by people with celiac disease, or whether it would permit limited gluten consumption within certain parameters. In fact, given the numerous products currently under development for celiac disease treatment, and hoping to see release in the next few years, we're likely to hear many claims, much hypes, and plenty of marketing and PR flash. Until we actually have a product that works safely and effectively, it seems that any claims regarding a cure for celiac disease are largely overblown PR smoke. That means you, University of Washington. Source: http://www.komonews.com/news/health/UW-Researchers-developing-cure-for-celiac-disease-302653671.html
  12. Celiac.com 04/02/2013 - Potato soup is a delicious treat. Potato soup that is delicious and also easy to prepare is an even better treat. This version comes together perfectly in a crock pot. Just add the ingredients, turn on the pot, and return later, and give a quick turn in the blender, and you'll have delicious potato soup. It also keeps well in the freezer. I like to make enough to freeze some for later, so I always have yummy soup on hand. Ingredients: 2 pounds Russet Potatoes, washed but NOT peeled. Diced into ½ inch cubes 1 large yellow onion, diced 1 shallot, sliced thin 5 cloves of garlic, peeled and left whole 4 cups gluten-free chicken stock ½ cup fresh cream 1 teaspoon of seasoned salt 4 ounces cream cheese Toppings: green onion, chopped bacon, shredded cheddar cheese, chives Directions: In the crockpot, put diced potatoes, onion, garlic, stock, and ½ tablespoon of seasoned salt. Stir to combine. Cook on low for 10 hours or high for 6 hours. When it's all cooked, stir in cream. Then, cube your cream cheese into 2 inch cubes, and stir in to the crock pot. Use an immersion blender to blend the soup in the crock pot. If you don’t have an immersion blender, then put the cream cheese in a regular blender with half of the soup and the garlic, and blend. Then add back into the crockpot, and stir. Spoon into bowls, top with garnishes of choice and serve.
  13. Chicken Marsala is one of those Italian delights that rely on the marriage of a few simple ingredients to forge a rich and satisfying main dish. In this case, butter, wine, mushrooms and cream come together to deliver a delicious sauce that takes the chicken to another level. This easy to make recipe for chicken Marsala delivers an elegant gluten-free version of this classic Italian dish. Ingredients: 2 skinless, boneless, chicken breasts salt and freshly ground black pepper 1/2 cup gluten-free flour up to 1/2 cup olive or vegetable oil 8 ounces container of mushroom, sliced and cleaned 2 tablespoons butter 1/2 cup sweet Marsala wine 1/4 cup chicken stock 1/4 cup sherry or dry white wine Optional: 2 tablespoons heavy cream Garnish with chopped parsley or oregano Directions: Cut chicken breasts in two lengthwise. Use a meat tenderizer or a mallet to pound meat until flat and about a quarter inch thick. Generously season the chicken with salt and pepper on both sides. Dredge the chicken in gluten-free flour. In a large skillet, heat oil to medium-high heat and sauté each piece of chicken for 3-4 minutes per side until golden brown. Place cooked chicken on a paper towel, lightly dab tops to remove extra oil, and cover with foil. Reduce the heat to medium and add butter and mushrooms same skillet. Season mushrooms with salt and pepper, and sauté for 4-5 minutes. Add marsala wine, sherry, cream, and chicken stock. Cook for 3-5 minutes so liquid is slightly reduced. Plate the chicken breasts, and to with mushrooms and sauce. Serve with your favorite gluten-free pasta, or your favorite risotto.
  14. Celiac.com 03/27/2013 - Increased rates of celiac disease over the last fifty years are not linked to wheat breeding for higher gluten content, but are more likely a result of increased per capita consumption of wheat flour and vital glutens, says a scientist working with the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). The researcher, Donald D. Kasarda is affiliated with the Western Regional Research Center of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service. Kasarda recently looked into one prominent theory that says that increased rates of celiac disease have been fueled by wheat breeding that has created higher gluten content in wheat varieties. His research article on the topic appears in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Kasarda says that, while increased consumption of wheat flour and vital wheat gluten may have contributed to the rise in celiac disease over the last decades, "wheat breeding for higher gluten content does not seem to be the basis." He notes that vital gluten is a wheat flour fraction used as an additive to improve characteristics like texture, and commonly featured in numerous and increasingly popular whole wheat products. However, he says that there is a lack of suitable data on the incidence of celiac disease by year to test this hypothesis. Part of his article features statistics on wheat flour consumption throughout the two centuries. He notes wheat flour consumption from all types of wheat hit an all-time high of 220 pounds per person (100kg) in 1900, declined steadily to a low of around 110 pounds per person (50kg) in 1970, then gradually rose to about 146 pounds per person (66kg) in 2000, and then decreased to about 134 pounds per person (61kg) in 2008. He goes on to point out that, even though consumption of wheat flour "seems to be decreasing slightly in recent years, there was an increase in the yearly consumption of wheat flour of about 35 lb (15.9kg) per person in the period from 1970 to 2000, which would correspond to an additional 2.9 lb (1.3kg) of gluten per person from that extra flour intake." Kasarda suggests that 'crude estimates' indicate that consumption of vital gluten has tripled since 1977. He finds this fact very interesting, because, he says, "it is in the time frame that fits with the predictions of an increase in celiac disease." However, he says that attributing an increase in the consumption of vital gluten directly to the rise of celiac disease remains challenging, partly because consumption of wheat flour increased far more significantly in the same time frame. Additionally, Kasarda says that there is no evidence that farmers have been breeding wheat to ensure higher protein and gluten content over the years. He points out that numerous studies have compared the protein contents of wheat varieties from the early part of the 20th century with those of recent varieties. These studies have all shown that, "when grown under comparable conditions, there was no difference in the protein contents," he said. One factor that remains unanswered is the relationship between higher rates of celiac disease and higher rates of diagnosis. That is, are more people developing celiac disease, or are more people simply with celiac disease getting diagnosed than in the past? It's likely that more and more people with celiac disease are being diagnosed, but it's unclear whether celiac disease rates are rising. There is just not enough evidence yet to provide a solid answer, although studies in the US and in Finland suggest that rates of celiac disease may be on the rise. Kasarda's article points out how much more research needs to be done. We need to determine if there is, in fact, a genuine rise in celiac disease rates and, if so, how such a rise might relate to gluten consumption. For now, though, there just isn't any solid evidence that wheat has any higher gluten levels than in the past, or that gluten consumption is driving an increase in celiac disease levels. What do you think? Have you heard this theory about modern wheat having higher gluten levels, or being substantially different than wheat in the past? Have you heard that such a difference may be driving higher rates of celiac disease? Please share your comments below. Source: J. Agric. Food Chem., 2013, 61 (6), pp 1155–1159. DOI: 10.1021/jf305122s
  15. Celiac.com 04/02/2014 - We hear lots of talk about the burgeoning market for gluten-free foods, but there is also plenty of confusion over what we are talking about when we talk about the gluten-free food market. So, what do we mean when we talk about the 'gluten-free food market?' Actually, the definition can vary depending on who's answering the question. Major research firms are important players in calculating market information and selling those calculations to commercially interested players, so their definition of the gluten-free market carries a good deal of weight in the business sector. However, a number of major research firms each calculate the size of the market a bit differently. The Mintel company, for example, employs the broadest definition, including any item with a gluten-free label, including products that might be naturally-gluten-free. Calculated that way, Mintel puts the market for gluten-free goods at $10.5 billion in 2013, and predicts it will rise 48% to $15.6 billion by 2016. Packaged Facts, meanwhile puts the market value at $4.2 billion for 2012. Euromonitor, finally, puts the gluten-free category at $486.5 million for 2013, comprising $281.5 million from bakery; $45.6 million from pasta; and $159.4 million from ready meals. Euromonitor also projects growth of 38.5% from 2013-18. For its purposes, Euromonitor confines its gluten-free definition to products formulated to replace wheat flour. Its definition specifically omits products that are are naturally gluten-free or products with minor formulation changes such as Chex cereals or Rice Krispies. One thing these companies have in common, is that their estimates all predict robust double-digit market gluten-free growth through the next few years. Source: Foodnavigator.com.
  16. Cashew chicken is one of my favorite Asian dishes, but it's almost always made with Hoisin sauce, which usually includes wheat flour, so I usually avoid the temptation to order it when I'm out. So, recently, just as I was recalling my love of cashew chicken, I remembered the gluten-free hoisin sauce in my refrigerator, and I was off to the races. This recipe for cashew chicken is easy to make, and delivers a tasty dish that will please most eaters, and help you to liven up your dinner repertoire. Ingredients: 1 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breast, cut into bite size strips, about 1-inch x ¼-inch each. 1 tablespoon cornstarch 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, such as safflower 5 slices ginger 6 cloves garlic, minced 8 scallions, white and green parts separated, each cut into 1-inch pieces ½ red bell pepper, sliced 1 stalk of celery, sliced ½ tablespoon gluten-free hoisin sauce (I use Premier brand) ½ tablespoon gluten-free oyster sauce 1 teaspoon gluten-free soy sauce 1 teaspoon teaspoon rice vinegar 3 tablespoons water 3 dashes white pepper powder ½ teaspoon sugar â…› teaspoon sesame oil ¾ cup toasted raw cashews ¼-½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes Salt to taste White rice, for serving (optional) Directions: In a medium bowl, toss chicken with cornstarch until chicken is coated; season with ¾ teaspoon salt and ¼ teaspoon pepper. Heat a tablespoon oil in a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Cook half the chicken, tossing often, until browned, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a plate. Add remaining oil and chicken to skillet along with the garlic, ginger, and white parts of scallions. Cook, tossing often, until chicken is browned, about 3 minutes. Return first batch of chicken to pan. Add vinegar; cook until evaporated, about 30 seconds. Add sesame oil, celery, red peppers, oyster sauce, hoisin sauce, soy sauce, pepper and water, and cook, tossing, until chicken is cooked through, about 1 minutes or so. Remove from heat. Stir in scallion greens and cashews. Serve immediately over white rice, if desired.
  17. Below is Ron Hoggan's reply the editor of the Montreal Gazette regarding the article: "Is gluten really something that most people should avoid?" Dear Health Editor: Mr. Dunning represents corn as a choice for bread-making prior to the advent of wheat, rye, and barley cultivation. However, the evidence suggests that corn was not yet available 10 to 15 thousand years ago when wheat, the earliest of these three grains, was first cultivated so it wasn’t available more than 20 thousand years ago when wild barley was first exploited ( 1 ). The evidence also indicates that corn was not available in the Near East, where wheat was first cultivated, as corn was a New World food developed by Mesoamerican indigenous peoples ( 2 ) half a world away. In short, corn was not a discarded option for bread making when and where gluten grains were first cultivated. Perhaps Mr. Dunning should be forgiven such a relatively minor mistake. After all, he is a journalist, not a cereal scientist. However, as he is identified, in the article in question, as a science writer and a critical analyst, that should set the bar a little higher. Surely we may expect him to conduct basic research in an area by at least glancing at some of the peer reviewed reports on this topic. The one time he does this, he harkens to a report on autism as a tool for arguing against the connection between ADHD and gluten*. For instance, he decries the adoption of a gluten free diet by those without celiac disease, gluten induced neuropathy, or wheat allergy. Yet more than 90% of those with celiac disease currently go undiagnosed in the USA (3) and the average delay between onset of symptoms and diagnosis is 11 years (4). Here in Canada, we have very long delays before most of us can get to see a gastroenterologist, so our delays to diagnosis may be even longer. This suggests that our rates of diagnosis are even lower than those of the USA. Perhaps Mr. Dunning’s querulous rhetoric could be more constructively directed at these long delays and the alarming rates of under-diagnosis of celiac disease. In the interim, it seems very sensible for those with undiagnosed celiac disease to follow a gluten free diet and experience the improved health and quality of life which Mr. Dunning admits are available to these individuals through a gluten free diet. This is an issue that might be revisited when our health care system is providing a timely diagnosis to at least a majority of cases of celiac disease. Recent research has also shown that those with non-celiac gluten sensitivity, which afflicts about 12% of the general population ( 5), experience even higher rates of morbidity and early mortality than those with celiac disease (6 ). Yet this group is either entirely ignored in Mr. Dunning’s article, or, more likely, it is the unstated focus of his attack. Mr. Dunning also seems to be unaware that humans lack the full compliment of enzymes necessary for full digestion of gluten proteins thus making many of the constituent amino acids beyond our ability to metabolize when he states that gluten is “a protein that your body uses.” He further asserts that there is no good reason to avoid gluten if one does not have one of the three conditions he lists. Yet my own work suggests that the morphine-like opioids derived from gluten grains may be a contributing factor in several types of malignancy ( 7). I was pleased to read that Mr. Dunning had at least glanced at data on gluten sensitive idiopathic neuropathy, but chagrined to read his speculation regarding the prevalence of this condition. I have devoted many years to the study of gluten’s impact on human health and have yet to read any work suggesting its prevalence. Perhaps Mr. Dunning could at least hint at his source when making such contentious claims. Nonetheless, there is clear evidence that a majority of those who experience gluten sensitive idiopathic neuropathy (5) do so in the presence of non-celiac gluten sensitivity, an autoimmune dynamic. Closer to home, our own Scott Frazer has demonstrated that consumption of gluten proteins is a potent force behind the development of many cases of type 1 diabetes (8). Reports of the causal connection between gluten consumption and autoimmune disease abound in the peer reviewed literature and are too numerous to warrant citing. Mr. Dunning also asserts “there is no evidence that incidence of disease increased worldwide once wheat became a staple.” The field of Archaeology differs dramatically with Mr. Dunning’s claim. In general, it is quite well established that pre-agricultural, hunter-gatherers were much taller and had stronger bones than their descendants who adopted agriculture (9). For instance, a common finding in the skeletal remains of early farmers is a condition of porotic hyperostosis (10). Mr. Dunning also seems to be unaware that fats, per gram, provide more than twice the energy available in either carbohydrates or proteins and this ignores the added weight of indigestible fibre. The increased caloric density of fats is a principle that most students learn in high school Biology classes. Yet Mr. Dunning asserts that bread was a source of high energy and light weight. While science requires scepticism and criticism to function, polemic rhetoric based on personal bias generates more heat than light. Mr. Dunning’s report is rife with errors and emotion. Publication of such dogma does little to enhance either the Gazette’s or Mr. Dunning’s credibility. Newspapers are given considerable credence as many readers, myself included, assume that journalists are exercising due diligence in checking their facts prior to publication of these reports. It is only when I read an article such as this one, that is deeply flawed and falls within my area of expertise, that my faith in journalists and the media is undermined. *note: The only report I could find that fits the meagre description provided by Mr. Dunning is one that involved 15 children who were studied over a 12 week period (11). If this is, indeed, the study Mr. Dunning referred to, it hardly provides conclusive evidence of anything beyond the obvious need for more comprehensive study in this area. His use of these data as a springboard for his absolutist claims seems highly questionable, to say the least. Sincerely, Ron Hoggan, Ed. D. Royal Roads University, Continuing Studies co-author: Dangerous Grains ISBN: 978158333-129-3 www.dangerousgrains.com editor: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity www.celiac.com editor/co-author: Cereal Killers http://tiny.cc/s7neg Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheat http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maize Fasano A, Berti I, Gerarduzzi T, Not T, Colletti RB, Drago S, Elitsur Y, Green PH, Guandalini S, Hill ID, Pietzak M, Ventura A, Thorpe M, Kryszak D, Fornaroli F, Wasserman SS, Murray JA, Horvath K. Prevalence of celiac disease in at-risk and not-at-risk groups in the United States: a large multicenter study. Arch Intern Med. 2003 Feb 10;163(3):286-92 Green PHR, Stavropoulos SN, Panagi SG, Goldstein SL, Mcmahon DJ, Absan H, Neugut AI. Am J Gastroenterol. 2001 Jan;96(1):126-31 Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71. Anderson LA, McMillan SA, Watson RG, Monaghan P, Gavin AT, Fox C, Murray LJ. Malignancy and mortality in a population-based cohort of patients with celiac disease or "gluten sensitivity". World J Gastroenterol. 2007 Jan 7;13(1):146-51. Hoggan R. Considering wheat, rye, and barley proteins as aids to carcinogens. Med Hypotheses. 1997 Sep;49(3):285-8. http://www.ohri.ca/profiles/scott.asp Lutz W. [The carbohydrate theory]. Wien Med Wochenschr. 1994;144(16):387-92. Wright L, Chew F, Porotic Hyperostosis and Paleoepidemiology: A Forensic Perspective on Anemia among the Ancient Maya. Am Anthro. 1998 Dec; 100: 924-939. Elder JH, Shankar M, Shuster J, Theriaque D, Burns S, Sherrill L. The gluten-free, casein-free diet in autism: results of a preliminary double blind clinical trial. J Autism Dev Disord. 2006 Apr;36(3):413-20.
  18. Celiac.com 11/12/2013 - If you say you're making a really good gluten-free Veal Parmesan or Chicken Parmesan for lunch or dinner, and if you say I am invited, then we are very likely going to be friends, for my heart holds a deep and abiding love those two dishes. Here's a quick, easy and elegant version. I like to make it with veal, but chicken is also delicious. Ingredients: 6 thin veal cutlets, about 2 1/2 ounces each OR 3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, halved horizontally ¾ cup of potato flour, rice flour, cornstarch, or general purpose gluten-free flour ¾ cup crushed Rice Chex or gluten-free breadcrumbs ½ cup grated Romano cheese 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon black pepper ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1 large egg, lightly beaten 2 cups your favorite easy tomato sauce--canned. jarred, whatever might be in the freezer, etc. ⅓ cup olive oil 4 ounces mozzarella cheese, preferably fresh, cut 6 1/4-inch-thick slices Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Directions: Combine breadcrumbs and grated Parmesan in a shallow bowl. Combine spices in a bowl and mix. Heat your oven's broiler. On the stove, warm the tomato sauce on a rear burner. On another burner, heat ½-inch of oil in large cast iron skillet over medium heat. Don't let oil get smoky. Season both sides of the cutlets with the spice mix of salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, thyme, oregano, paprika, and cayenne. Dredge cutlets in gluten-free flour of choice. Then dip cutlets in the beaten egg, then dredge in breadcrumb and cheese mixture, turning to coat both sides. Place 3 cutlets on a plate. Place 3 cutlets in skillet; cook until golden, 1 to 2 minutes on each side. Using a spatula, transfer browned cutlets to a 10x15 inch baking pan. Top off oil in the skillet. Cook the remaining cutlets. Place remaining cutlets in baking pan. Top each cutlet with a slice of mozzarella. Now, here's where I do things differently than most traditional preparation methods. Instead of lining the pan with the tomato sauce, I broil the fried cutlets alone--about 4 inches from heat source until cheese is melted and lightly browned in spots, 4 to 5 minutes. I serve them immediately with warm tomato sauce on the side. This makes for a crunchier cutlet and the ability to add sauce at will. You can also put the warm sauce on the plate and top with the broiled cutlas. Or you can do it the traditional way, by putting the sauce in the pan, then putting the cutlets and cheese in and broiling. However you do it, I'm sure you'll make friend with this gluten-free version of veal and chicken Parmesan.
  19. Okay, so it's still a little early for peaches, but peach season is just around the corner, and when it comes, one of my favorite things to make with peaches, especially early in the season, is a tasty peach crisp. This version comes together quickly and delivers a delicious peach crisp that will have your eaters asking for seconds in no time. Makes about six portions, so scale accordingly. Ingredients: 6 fresh peaches, peeled, pitted and sliced ½ teaspoon almond extract ½ teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup gluten-free all-purpose flour ¾ cup white sugar ½ cup brown sugar ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon salt ½ cup butter Directions: Heat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C). Place the peaches in the bottom of a greased, 8-inch square baking dish. Sprinkle peaches with vanilla and almond extracts. In a medium mixing bowl, combine the flour, sugar, brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt. Use a pastry cutter to cut the butter into the flour mixture until the mixture forms pea-sized crumbs. Sprinkle the flour mixture in an even layer over the top of the peaches, and bake in the preheated oven for about 45 minutes, until the peaches are bubbling and the topping is browned. Note: Some gluten-free flours do not brown as well as regular flour, so be careful to avoid overcooking. Serve with vanilla ice cream, frozen yogurt, or regular plain yogurt, as desired.
  20. Celiac.com 11/02/2011 - With the rise in celiac disease diagnoses, increasing awareness of gluten-free issues, and an explosion of gluten-free related products, it is no surprise that supplements claiming to break down gluten would find their way onto the market. In fact, a number of supplements currently on the market claim to do just that: to break down gluten after it has been consumed. Are these claims accurate? Are these products in any way helpful for people following a gluten-free diet? Finally, do these supplements offer a safe alternative to a gluten-free diet for people who suffer from celiac disease and/or gluten-sensitivity? For example, GlutenEase, made by Enzymedica Inc., contains a blend of enzymes, including amylase, glucoamylase and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DDP-IV) — that are intended to "digest both gluten and casein, a protein found in milk," according to the company. The website for GlutenEase says that the supplement can "support" people who have trouble digesting gluten. However, and most importantly, the site says that GlutenEase is "not formulated" for people with celiac disease. Gluten Defense, made by Enzymatic Therapy Inc., contains a similar blend of enzymes that includes DDP-IV, lactase and amylase. The site for Gluten Defense says the product is "specifically formulated to defend against hidden gluten" that can cause gas, bloating and indigestion. But what does that mean? Does that mean that taking the supplement might offer people with celiac disease some extra protection against accidental gluten contamination? That seems doubtful, and unproven from a scientific standpoint. Unlike GlutenEase, Gluten Defense offers no specific disclaimer for people with celiac disease. There is also no claim that the product is safe, or in any way formulated for people with celiac disease. Dave Barton, whose title is "Director of Education" for Enzymedica, claims that many people who say they have celiac disease see improvement when taking product, and that some even manage to begin eating wheat again. However, Barton is quick to warn consumers that there's "no way to guarantee that it would break down 100% of gluten proteins." But that's the problem isn't it? It would need to break down nearly all of the gluten proteins in order for those proteins to not cause damage to the person with celiac disease. The fact is that these enzyme supplements may break down a few molecules of gluten protein, but no supplement exists that will make it safe for people with celiac disease to eat gluten again. According to Dr. Stefano Guandalini, professor of pediatrics and director of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center, "[t]he amount of gluten that these would be able to digest is ridiculously low. For people with celiac disease, these are something to completely avoid." Dr. Peter Green, director of the Columbia University's Celiac Disease Center, agrees that current enzyme supplements would digest only a small percentage of gluten molecules. However, Green adds, the basic concept is sound. Pharmaceutical companies are spending hundreds of millions of dollars to create an enzyme-based drug that would permit people with celiac disease to consume gluten. However, Green points out, the companies wouldn't be spending that money if a successful over-the-counter alternative already existed. Bottom line: Enzymes currently claiming to help break down gluten protein will not permit people with celiac disease to safely consume products made with wheat, rye or barley. Any benefit these enzymes may provide for people with celiac disease is strictly theoretical, and likely minimal at best. A completely gluten-free diet is currently the only proven treatment for celiac disease. Talk with your doctor before making any changes to your gluten-free diet for celiac disease treatment. Source: http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-skeptic-gluten-supplements-20110926,0,2998711.story
  21. One of the few things better than a delicious soup is a rich, delicious soup that is easy and quick to make. In this recipe for potato leek soup, butter, chicken broth, leeks, cream and potatoes come together to yield a rich, luscious soup that goes great with your favorite toasted gluten-free bread. Ingredients: 1 cup butter 2 leeks, sliced 2 bay leaves 2 tablespoons chives, chopped 4 sprigs fresh thyme 10 black peppercorns 1 quart gluten-free chicken broth 1 cup dry white wine 4 cups Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and diced 1½ cups heavy cream ½ tablespoon white pepper salt and pepper to taste Directions: Trim away the green portions of the leek, leaving just the white part. Keep the two largest and longest leaves, and make a bouquet garni by folding the 2 leaves around the bay leaves, peppercorns and thyme. Tie into a package-shaped bundle with kitchen twine and set aside. Or, place two leek leaves, bay leaves, peppercorns and thyme together in a piece of cheesecloth. Cut the white part of the leek in half lengthwise, and rinse well under cold running water to make sure the leek is clean. Slice thinly crosswise and set aside. In a large pot over medium heat, melt butter. Cook leeks in butter with salt and pepper until tender, stirring frequently, about 15 minutes. Add the chopped leeks and cook until wilted, about 5 minutes. Add the wine and bring to a boil. Add the reserved bouquet garni, chicken stock, potatoes, salt and white pepper, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes, or until the potatoes are falling apart and the soup is very flavorful. Remove the herbs and peppercorns. Adding just a little bit at a time, puree the soup in a food processor or blender. Be careful! Cover top with a towel to prevent scalding if any soup escapes. Stir in the creme and season with salt and pepper as desired. Spoon soup into serving bowls and top with chopped chives.
  22. If you want a tasty, healthy treat that's cheap, super simple to make and delivers big flavor, try this recipe for homemade applesauce. It's one of those dishes that kids can help you make, and which will leave smiles all around. Ingredients: 4 apples - peeled, cored and chopped ¾ cup water ¼ cup white sugar ½-¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon, to taste Directions: In a saucepan, combine apples, water, sugar, and cinnamon. Cover, and cook over medium heat until apples are soft, about 15 to 20 minutes. Allow to cool, then put them in a blender and blend until smooth. If you don't have a blender, then you can mash them with a fork or potato masher. Serve alone, or over ice cream or frozen yogurt.
  23. Simple, rustic foods are one of my true loves. Simple, rustic, Italian foods are one of my great loves. The Italian word 'cacciatore' means 'hunter.' In Italy, dishes prepared 'alla cacciatore,' or 'hunter-style,' usually include chicken or sometimes rabbit, and are prepared with tomatoes, onions, herbs, often bell pepper, and often include either red or white wine. Because the chicken or the rabbit are commonly dredged in flour, traditional cacciatore dishes can be off limits for people eating a gluten-free diet. However, with a spot of modification, that hurdle can be cleared, and a wonderful gluten-free vesion of the dish can be enjoyed. This recipe for chicken cacciatore makes about four servings. Ingredients: 4 chicken thighs 2 chicken breasts with skin and backbone, halved crosswise ½ cup tapioca, rice or other gluten-free flour or potato starch, for dredging 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium green bell pepper, chopped 1 medium red bell pepper, chopped 1 large onion, chopped 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped ¾ cup dry white wine (red wine works, too) 1 ( 28-ounce) can diced tomatoes with juice ¾ cup reduced-sodium chicken broth 3 tablespoons drained capers 1½ teaspoons dried oregano leaves ¼ cup coarsely chopped fresh basil leaves 2½ teaspoons salt, plus more to taste 1½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more to taste Directions: Sprinkle the chicken pieces with 1 teaspoon of each salt and pepper. Dredge the chicken pieces in gluten-free flour mixture to coat lightly. In a large heavy sauté pan, heat the oil to medium-high flame. Sauté chicken pieces until brown, about 5 minutes per side. Transfer browned chicken to a plate and set aside. In the same pan sauté bell pepper, onion and garlic over medium heat until the onion is soft, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Add the wine and simmer a few minutes until liquid is reduced by half. Add the tomatoes with the juice, broth, capers and oregano. Return the chicken pieces to the pan and turn them to coat in the sauce. Bring the sauce to a simmer. Continue simmering over medium-low heat until the chicken is cooked, about 30 minutes for the breast pieces, and 20 minutes for the thighs. Using tongs, transfer the chicken to a platter. If necessary, boil the sauce for a few minutes, until it thickens up. Spoon off any excess fat from atop the sauce. Spoon the sauce over the chicken, then sprinkle with the basil and serve with rice or pasta for a delicious meal.
  24. In my house, the chilly appearance of fall means stews, soups and chilies simmering on the stove. Fall is when I love making dishes that not only help to warm the house, but also fill it with delicious aromas that tease my nose until dinner time. Chili is one of my favorite things to make in fall. Below is a recipe for a rich, delicious chili that will delight your nose as it cooks, and delight yourself, friends and family when it's time to eat. It is easy to make, keeps well in the fridge or freezer, and makes a great main dish, or a great side for a game day or the family visit pot-luck. Ingredients: 2 pounds extra-lean ground beef 1 teaspoon butter 1 large white onion, chopped 2 garlic cloves, chopped 1 can (4.5 ounces) mild green chili peppers, chopped 1 habanero pepper, halved and seeded (optional) 2 (15 ounce) cans red kidney beans, drained 1 (15 ounce) can pinto beans, drained 1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce 1 (28-ounce) can crushed tomatoes 1 tablespoon chili powder 1 teaspoon ground cumin ½ teaspoon ground oregano 2 teaspoons salt ½ teaspoon garlic powder 3-4 drops of of hot red pepper sauce, to taste (Louisiana Brand or other gluten-free brand) Note: If you use fresh, dry beans, be sure to clean them and soak them overnight before cooking. Directions: In a large pot, cook the ground beef over medium heat until evenly browned. Drain off grease, and set aside. Melt butter in a skillet over medium heat. Sauté the onions and garlic about 3-5 minutes, until onions are clear, adding green chills and habanero during last 2 minutes. Remove the onions, garlic and peppers from the heat and add them to the pot with the ground beef, and set the heat to medium. Add habanero halves. Add the kidney beans and tomato sauce to the beef mixture, and season with chili powder, salt, garlic salt and hot pepper sauce. Bring to a simmer, and adjust seasonings to taste if necessary. Cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer for 2-3 hours, stirring occasionally. When it's done, remove the habanero pieces and discard. Serve chili with buttered gluten-free cornbread or other favorite gluten-free bread.
  25. Celiac.com 08/08/2012 - In the UK, people with celiac disease get their gluten-free food subsidized by the government as part of their national health care. This includes items like gluten-free pizzas. This practice works in much the same way that insurance companies in America cover drug prescriptions for their members. Those members with a doctor's prescription pay a reduced cost or no cost at all on certain items. In the UK, everyone is insured by the National Health Service (NHS). There, people with celiac disease and certain other conditions get prescriptions that allow them to obtain gluten-free food at a reduced cost. In a recent story, BBC news claims that, as part of this service, the NHS is spending £17 (about $26) on each gluten-free pizza it supplies. That amount would equal four times the original base price of the pizza, since they originally cost less than £4.50 (about $6) each. According to the BBC, once manufacturing, handling and delivery fees were added, the bill for the NHS had risen to £34 (over fifty bucks) for two pizzas. Without acknowledging the actual cost per pizza, Stuart Lakin, head of medicines management at NHS Rotherham, said that the NHS was making efforts to minimize wholesaler delivery charges on the pizzas by switching patients from brands that attract additional charges. He added that costs for all gluten-free products was down from £274,611 in 2009/10 to just £177,153 in 2011/12. Moreover, he noted, only patients with clinically diagnosed celiac disease are eligible for prescriptions for gluten-free products. Health Secretary Andrew Lansley pointed out that prescriptions encouraged celiac sufferers to more strictly follow gluten-free diets, but admitted that the practice is ‘under ongoing review.' What do you think? Should gluten-free food be treated like medicine for people with celiac disease, and be covered under insurance plans like prescription drugs? Is $26 dollars too much to pay for a gluten-free pizza? Source: BBC News
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