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Found 3 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/29/2016 - As part of a call for public comment that expired on May 30, 2016 at 8:00 PM EST, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force issued a Draft Recommendation Statement regarding celiac disease screening. The draft was distributed solely for the purpose of receiving public input. It has not been disseminated otherwise by the USPSTF. The final Recommendation Statement will be developed after careful consideration of the feedback received and will include both the Research Plan and Evidence Review as a basis. The statement is intended for adults, adolescents, and children who do not have signs or symptoms of celiac disease. The statement is basically a call for more evidence. It expresses the USPSTF conclusion that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic persons. The USPSTF website regarding this announcement includes information on the Rationale, Clinical Considerations, Other Considerations, Discussion, Recommendations of Others, and References. Current testing recommendations include: The American College of Gastroenterology recommends that asymptomatic persons with a first-degree relative who has a confirmed diagnosis of celiac disease be considered for testing. Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus should be tested for celiac disease if there are any digestive symptoms, signs, or laboratory evidence suggestive of celiac disease. The U.K. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommends offering serologic testing for celiac disease to persons with a first-degree relative with celiac disease or persons with type 1 diabetes mellitus or autoimmune thyroid disease upon diagnosis. Serologic testing for celiac disease should be considered for persons with any of the following: metabolic bone disorder (reduced bone mineral density or osteomalacia), unexplained neurologic symptoms (particularly peripheral neuropathy or ataxia), unexplained subfertility or recurrent miscarriage, persistently elevated liver enzymes with unknown cause, dental enamel defects, Down syndrome, or Turner syndrome. The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition recommends testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic children who have conditions associated with celiac disease (type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroiditis, Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, Williams syndrome, selective IgA deficiency, and first-degree relatives with celiac disease). It recommends testing asymptomatic children who are at risk beginning around age 3 years, provided they have had an adequate gluten-containing diet for at least 1 year before testing. It recommends that asymptomatic persons with negative serology who are at risk be considered for repeat testing.19 Read more at: uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org
  2. Celiac.com 01/11/2005 - After being diagnosed with celiac disease and going on a 100% gluten-free diet, make sure your doctor: Tests your bone density (osteoporosis is more likely in those with untreated celiac disease); Tests your blood for iron and folate deficiencies; Vaccinates you for pneumococcal disease (serious infections are common in immune-stressed individuals. This step will vary with your overall condition upon diagnosis and may not be necessary). Other recommendations for initial management of celiac disease: Referral to a dietitian and support group; Ensure all regular medications are gluten-free; If osteoporosis is found, assess vitamin D and parathyroid hormone concentrations; Blood screening of your parents, children, brothers and sisters for celiac disease. Check the Diseases and Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease section of Celiac.com and if you have any other health problems listed in that section be sure to discuss this with your doctor. Many people with celiac disease have additional food intolerance, and therefore never fully recover on a gluten-free diet alone. If you fall into this category try the following: Re-check your diet and make sure it is 100% gluten-free; Food allergy testing (finger-stick or ELISA); An elimination diet; Keep a food diary; Try a rotation diet--only eating the top food allergens once every few days. The most common additional food intolerance are: Cows milk, corn, soy and eggs. Many people who have had difficulty recovering from celiac disease have found that maintaining a "paleo" perspective which favors unprocessed meats, vegetables, and fruits while avoiding all grains, is the final step necessary for a complete recovery. For more information on this topic the Winter 2005 edition of Scott-Free Newsletter has an excellent article: Putting the Pieces Back Together by Roy S. Jamron, which is available on-line to all subscribers. A special thanks to Ron Hoggan for providing me with some of the information that appears in this article.
  3. Celiac.com 12/28/2006 - The American Diabetes Associations (ADA) Clinical Practice Recommendations have been updated to include new information about treatment and prevention that reflects the latest research. Changes have been made in numerous areas, including the management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes; nutrition recommendations; and screening and treatment for children who have both type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. In 2006, the ADA published Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) guidelines for people with diabetes, specific to individual populations, such as those who are obese or pregnant. The Clinical Practice Recommendations have been updated to reflect these guidelines and to encourage people with diabetes or pre- diabetes to seek individualized MNT to help them achieve their treatment goals. Information about how to treat children who are diagnosed with both type 1 diabetes and celiac disease was also added to the Clinical Practice Recommendations this year. Up to 16 percent of children with type 1 diabetes are also diagnosed with celiac disease, an immune disorder that affects the digestive system, damages the small intestine and interferes with the absorption of nutrients from food. The recommendations call for more aggressive screening for celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes who present symptoms such as weight loss, growth failure, abdominal pain and chronic fatigue. A gluten-free diet is recommended for those who test positive for celiac. Diabetes Care, published by the American Diabetes Association, is the leading peer-reviewed journal of clinical research into the nations fifth leading cause of death by disease. Diabetes also is a leading cause of heart disease and stroke, as well as the leading cause of adult blindness, kidney failure, and non-traumatic amputations. For more information about diabetes call 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383).
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