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Found 6 results

  1. Celiac.com 02/14/2013 - Gluten-free tennis sensation Novak Djokovic's recent five set victory over Andy Murray at Melbourne Park makes him the first man in the 45-year Open era to win three consecutive Australian Opens. Since going gluten-free in 2010, after tests indicated that he suffered from gluten-intolerance, the 25-year-old Djokovic is undefeated at the Australian Open, and virtually unstoppable on the court. Following a high-protein, gluten-free diet, Djokovic now avoids most starches, including his past favorites, pizza and pasta. The Serbian tennis star credits the gluten-free diet with sharp improvements to his tennis and his health. “Mentally, you’ll be fresh, you’ll be happier, you’ll be calmer," said Djokovic. Physically, you’ll be stronger, faster, more dynamic, your muscles will work better. That’s what I feel." At first, the already slim 6-foot-2 Djokovic lost 10 pounds after cutting gluten out of his diet, but insists it has only helped his game. "I have lost some weight but it's only helped me, because my movement is much sharper now and I feel great physically," said Novak, whose weight now hovers at 176 pounds. “I am very skinny. [but] I am fast and very powerful on the court, so this is what matters.” When he's not in training, Djokovic has been known to backslide and eat some of his old favorites, including pizza and pasta, a pattern familiar to many folks seeking to follow a gluten-free diet, especially those who don't suffer immediate symptoms. However, he says that following a gluten-free diet brings out his best. "If you can mentally overcome this greed and eat only the food that is good for your metabolism, then you will have the best results, not just in tennis but in life as well," he says. Djokovic has now won a total of four Australian Open trophies: In 2008, and then 2011, 2012 and 2013.
  2. Celiac.com 01/11/2013 - In case you were wondering just how big gluten-free pizza has become, the answer is: Big. Very big. World-record big. Consider the recent news from Italy, where five chefs joined forces to craft the world's largest pizza, a pizza which also happens to be gluten-free. The pie shattered the previous world record for largest pizza ever baked, and set a new record for world's largest gluten-free pizza. To make the pizza, the chefs used 19,800 pounds of Schar gluten-free flour, 2,480 gallons of water, 10,000 pounds of tomato sauce, 8,800 pounds of mozzarella cheese, 1,488 pounds of margarine, 551 pounds of rock salt, 275 pounds of parmesan cheese, 220 pounds of lettuce and 55 pounds of vinegar, and 298 gallons of yeast. The final product required two full days of cooking to complete. It was 131-feet across, and topped the scales at a whopping 51,257 pounds. According to the Guinness World Records, the previous record for the largest circular pizza ever baked belonged to a pie made in Norwood, South Africa by Norwood Hypermarket on December 8, 1990. That pizza weighed 26,883 pounds. It measured 122 feet, 8 inches in diameter, weighed 26,883 pounds, and contained 9,920 pounds of flour, 3,960 pounds of cheese, 1,763 pounds of mushrooms, 1,984 pounds of tomato puree, and 1,984 pounds of chopped tomatoes. The Italian cooking team was headed by Dovilio Nardi, who had previously helped to create an Italian pizza chain that catered toward people with celiac disease. The event was organized by Dr. Schar, a company that produces gluten-free food. Source: Business Wire
  3. Celiac.com 07/31/2012 - Dana Vollmer could be walking (or swimming) proof of the benefits a gluten-free diet can afford athletes. In the second day of London's 2012 Olympics, Vollmer, who suffers from gluten sensitivity and an egg allergy, took the gold medal in the Women's 100-meter butterfly final, breaking her own personal record, as well as the world record. What is interesting about Vollmer and her success is that she seems to have reached her athletic peak while on a gluten-free diet. In the days before her diagnosis, she did what many Olympic athletes do before competitions: load up on carbohydrates. With pasta and eggs out of the equation, that becomes harder to accomplish, so some might think that she would be at a disadvantage. Evidently, she is not missing the pasta or the eggs though. On Sunday, she managed to break the 6-minute mark, clocking in at 55.98 seconds to break the world record and set a milestone for athletes and celiacs everywhere. So what does Vollmer fuel her gold-winning machinery with? According to her Twitter feed, the hard-earned gold was won on rice, almonds, sunflower seeds, crushed peanuts, peanut butter, milk and bananas. In an interview with KidsHealth, she said she also eats a great deal of quinoa, lean meat, vegetables and brown rice. It may not be the carb-heavy diet that Olympic athletes have been trained on, but clearly Vollmer is getting the nutrition and protein she needs to take home medals. With this precedent set, perhaps more Olympic athletes will start adopting the gluten-free diet. Sources: http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/health/Gluten-Free-Dana-Vollmer-164310186.html http://twitter.com/danavollmer http://kidshealth.org/kid/health_problems/allergiesimmune/vollmer.html
  4. Celiac.com 10/07/2011 - In October 2010, Kicking 4 Celiac Foundation Executive Director Craig Pinto made 717 regulation field goals in a 12 hour period to set a Guinness World Record. That success marked the beginning of the foundation's annual “Kicking4Celiac” event, which raises money and awareness for celiac disease. The second annual “Kicking4Celiac” event is set for October 9th, when Pinto will return to the football field at Bethpage High School and attempt a second world record, this one for the “Most Field Goals made in 24 Hours.” Pinto must make a at least 1,000 field goals in 24 hours to break the existing world record. This year’s event will help to grow the foundation's scholarship program, which, beginning in early 2012, will award scholarships to college-bound students with celiac disease. Speaking of last year's event, Pinto said that "the progression mirrored what I went through with celiac disease. The initial mental stress, the physical stress, but the hard work to make it through, and come out on top. It is something I want to continue to do, to break people’s thoughts and stigmas that when you’re diagnosed with celiac disease that your physical abilities will change." Pinto added that the “support from people reaching out was absolutely amazing, and it just showed how strong the celiac community stands behind and supports each other. We’re in this together.”
  5. Celiac.com 11/22/2010 - A $45 million donation to University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research will be used to create a first-of-its-kind institute to find new treatments, and perhaps a cure, for celiac disease. The donation comes at the behest of the family of a grateful patient from Indiana, Shelia Cafferty. The institute made possible by the donation could eventually employ up to 200 doctors and researchers who will not only study celiac disease, but use it as a model to better understand other associated autoimmune disorders, including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Dr. Alessio Fasano, Director of the Center for Celiac Research announced the donation at a press conference at West Baltimore's University of Maryland BioPark. Speaking about the donation, Fasano told interviewers that raising "enough money is always a problem" for celiac research, and that what has been needed "for a major breakthrough is thinking out of the box, and this will allow us to do just that." In some ways, Cafferty's nutritional health battle is similar to that fought by many people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance. She suffered nine years of debilitating gastrointestinal symptoms and rashes before she began to suspect wheat a few years ago. Cafferty, a nurse, put herself on a gluten-free diet, which provided relief, but not all of the answers. She continued to visit doctors looking for answers. About a year ago, Cafferty's determined husband tracked down Dr. Fasano, who was able to diagnose her gluten sensitivity. Fasano's diagnosis provided tremendous relief for the Caffertys, and left them with a resolve to help save others from going through similar suffering. "There are a lot of people like me, not getting answers," she said by phone from Indiana. She was unable to make the announcement with her husband Ken. "When you don't feel good, it impacts your activity and your daily living." As a result of their gratitude and resolve, Sue Cafferty and her husband Ken gave $5 million to Fasano's center and arranged for the donation of another $40 million from a foundation with which they are affiliated, but which declined to be named. Ken Cafferty said he and his wife want their money to raise the public's and doctors' awareness, as well as to fund research into treatments and a cure for celiac disease and other autoimmune disorders. "It's heartbreaking to see someone you love suffer," he said. During the press conference, Dr. Jay Perman, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore, said he expected the celiac center to collaborate with numerous researchers across, and that research done "using the Cafferty's funds will...enable research to result in real solutions for patients and their families."
  6. Celiac.com 09/30/2010 - New York arena football kicker, Craig Pinto, will attempt to set a world record for most field goals kicked within a twelve hour period, and to raise money and awareness for celiac disease. Pinto's effort will get underway on October 10, 2010, when he begins kicking field goals for 12 straight hours. In addition to raising money and awareness for celiac disease, a condition in which people who consume proteins found in wheat, rye, or barley suffer damage to their digestive tracts, Pinto, who has lived with celiac disease for more than a decade hopes to show that people with celiac disease can remain physically active, and even excel in their chosen activities. “With something that has affected me, and is so close to my heart, it only makes sense to utilize things I love – kicking and football – to raise money and awareness for my other passion,” says Craig. “And that is spreading the word and educating people about Celiac Disease.” Each field goal must be kicked from at least forty yards away from the goal post, and will be judged by official referees to make sure each kick meets specific record breaking criteria. All proceeds will benefit the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University. For more information or to make a donation visit www.kicking4celiac.com. Bethpage High School 10 Cherry Avenue Bethpage, New York 11714 October 10th, 2010 7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.
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