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Found 7 results

  1. Sweet Baby Cakes has come up with some of the best gluten-free brownies we've ever tried. Their traditional Chocolate Fudge Brownie is a brownie lover's delight. Made from chocolate syrup, black bean flour and flax meal, this brownie tastes as good as it looks. The brownie is chewy and sweetened with agave, but it is not so sweet that you can't eat the whole brownie in one sitting! These brownies are also ready to eat from the freezer, which means you don't have to thaw or microwave them before eating. For more information, visit their website. Review written by Patricia Seeley.
  2. Celiac.com 06/21/2012 - Retrospective studies and case reports have suggested that older patients with celiac disease may suffer from impaired cognitive function. To evaluate this possibility, a research team recently conducted a study of people with celiac disease who are over age 65. The researchers included S. Casella, B. Zanini, F. Lanzarotto, C. Ricci, A. Marengoni, G. Romanelli, A. Lanzini, of the Gastroenterology Unit of the Department of Medicine at University and Spedali Civili in Brescia, Italy. The researchers wanted to evaluate functional and cognitive performances in celiac disease, and in control patients, older than 65 years. For their study, they recruited 18 celiac disease patients aged 75-years or older (±4 years, group A) who had been on a gluten free diet for an average of 5.5 years (±3 years), along with a control group of 18 patients matched for sex and age, averaging 76 years of age (±4 years, group . The team then administered a number of functional and cognitive neuropsychological tests. They recorded the results as "row scores" and as "equivalent scores" by relating "raw scores" to reference rank categories. For the functional tests, they found that the Barthel Index of functional performance was similar for both groups. However, for the cognitive tests, they found that the "raw score" was significantly lower in celiac disease than controls. The cognitive tests included Mini Mental Test Examination (p=0.02), Trail Making Test (p=0.001), Semantic Fluency (p=0.03), Digit Symbol Test (p=0.007), Ideo-motor apraxia (p The also found that the "equivalent score" was also lower in celiac disease than controls for tests of Semantic memory. The results showed that cognitive performance is worse in elderly patients with celiac disease than in healthy control patients, despite prolonged treatment with a gluten-free diet. They write that "awareness on the increasing phenomenon of late-onset celiac disease is important to minimize diagnostic delay and prolonged exposure to gluten that may adversely and irreversibly affect cognitive function." Source: Dig Liver Dis. 2012 Apr 6.
  3. Celiac.com 06/30/2008 - In the crypts of the small bowel, there is a group of small, granular epithelial cells, called Paneth cells, which play an important part in innate immune system. There has been some controversy about what role Paneth cells might play in complicating celiac disease, so team of Italian researchers set out to examine the distribution, proliferation, and function of paneth cells in adults with uncomplicated and complicated celiac disease. The research team was made up of P. Biancheri , Cdel V. Blanco, L. Cantoro, M. De Vincenzi, A. Di Sabatino, W. Dhaliwal, E. Miceli, R. Salerno, A. Vanoli, T.T. Macdonald, and G.R. Corazza. The team is affiliated with the Celiac Specialty Center at the First Department of Medicine at University of Pavia in Pavia, Italy. Seeking to better understand the function and the numbers of Paneth cell adults with celiac disease (celiac disease), the team measured Paneth cells and human alpha-defensin (HD)-5 and HD-6 in 28 adults with uncomplicated celiac disease, 8 patients with complicated celiac disease (3 with ulcerative jejunoileitis, 2 with refractory sprue, and 3 with enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma), and 14 control subjects. Subjects with uncomplicated untreated and treated celiac disease showed similar numbers of Paneth cells, with similar cell proliferation, compared to the control group, while subjects with complicated celiac disease showed much fewer Paneth. Subjects with uncomplicated untreated celiac disease, and those with treated celiac disease showed similar levels of mucosal HD-5 and HD-6 compared to the control group, while cells taken from the biopsies of subjects with treated celiac disease and challenged with gliadin proteins showed no change in mucosal HD-5 and HD-6 transcripts. Furthermore, those subjects with uncomplicated celiac disease showed no reduction in mucosal Paneth cell numbers and alpha-defensins. Clearly, a small study such as this will not tell us exactly how a reduction in the numbers of Paneth cells might complicate celiac disease, but since the role of Paneth cells is so vital to healthy innate immune function, it does point to the need for further examination. Am J Clin Pathol. 2008 Jul;130(1):34-42.
  4. Celiac,com 10/08/2010 - Many people are familiar with probiotics, such as acidophilus, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus case, which promote beneficial gut bacteria, and are commonly found in yogurt, kefir and other fermented milk products. But how many of us have heard of polysaccharides, which are a particular kind of carbohydrate made up of of a number of monosaccharides joined together by something called glycosidic bonds. On a simpler note, polysaccharides are also known as pre-biotics, because they serve as fuel for probiotic bacteria, and help to promote healthy ratios of beneficial bacteria to non-beneficial bacteria in the gut. It is well-known among scientists that diet has a major influence on the health and diversity of gut microbiota. People with celiac disease must follow a gluten-free diet in order to avoid associated damage and health disorders. When people with celiac disease follow a gluten-free diet, their celiac symptoms disappear and their gut begins to heal itself from the damage. The health effects of the diet for people with celiac disease are overwhelmingly positive. However, there is some evidence that by eliminating gluten, people with celiac disease are making themselves susceptible to a plunge in beneficial gut bacteria, and an elevated ratio of bad-to-good gut bacteria. This may have immune-system implications for those people. To test this hypothesis, a team of scientists recently conducted a preliminary study to determine if a gluten-free diet alone could change the make-up and immune properties of gut microbiota. The team included G. De Palma, I. Nadal, M. C. Collado, and Y. Sanz. Their full results appear in theSeptember, 2009 issue of the British Journal of Nutrition. To briefly summarize their study, the team enrolled ten healthy individuals without celiac disease, averaging just over 30 years of age. They put these people on a gluten-free diet for a month. Subsequent analysis of fecal microbiota and dietary intake showed a decrease in healthy gut bacteria, coupled with an increase of unhealthy bacteria that corresponded with reduced intake of polysaccharides after following the gluten-free diet. Another healthy control group that ate a diet that contained gluten, and thus provided polysaccharides. In addition representing an adversely change in gut microbiota, the samples taken while the individuals followed a gluten-free diet also exerted reduced immune stimulatory effects on peripheral blood mononuclear cells than those of subjects on a regular gluten-containing, polysaccharide-rich diet. Should these findings be confirmed by subsequent studies, the results could call attention to a more comprehensive approach to proper dietary intake in people with celiac disease, including dietary counseling, and possible supplementation of the diet with polysaccharides. Source: Br J Nutr. 2009 Oct;102(8):1154-60.
  5. Celiac.com 06/30/2010 - Presently, the only proven treatment for celiac disease is a lifelong gluten-free diet. As part of a gluten-free diet, people with celiac disease are encouraged to avoid consuming foods containing rye, along with avoiding wheat and barley. However, there is surprisingly little evidence to document the adverse effects of rye in cases of celiac disease. To address this deficiency, a team of clinicians set out to determine conclusively whether rye should be excluded from the celiac diet. The team included S. M. Stenman, K. Lindfors, J. I. Venäläinen, A. Hautala, P. T. Männistö, J. A. Garcia-Horsman, A. Kaukovirta-Norja, S. Auriola, T. Mauriala, M. Mäki, and K. Kaukinen They are affiliated variously with the Department of Pediatrics, and the Pediatric Research Center of the Medical School University of Tampere, the Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery at Tampere University Hospital, the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of Kuopio, the Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, the Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of Helsinki, and Technical Research Centre of Finland. The goal of the team was to determine whether rye secalin triggers toxic reactions in vitro in intestinal epithelial cell models to the same degree as wheat gliadin. Moreover, they examined whether the harmful effects of secalin can be reduced by germinating cereal enzymes from oat, wheat and barley to hydrolyze secalin into short fragments as a pretreatment. The data showed that secalin did trigger toxic reactions in intestinal Caco-2 epithelial cells in a similar manner to gliadin. Secalin triggered epithelial cell layer permeability, tight junctional protein occludin and ZO-1 distortion, and actin reorganization. High-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS), showed that germinating barley enzymes best degraded the secalin and gliadin peptides. Further in vitro analysis showed that germinating barley enzyme pretreatment ameliorated all toxic secalin-triggered reactions. From these results, the team concludes that germinating enzymes from barley offer efficient degradation of rye secalin. In future, these enzymes might be utilized as a novel medical treatment for celiac disease or in food processing in order to develop high-quality celiac-safe food products. Such enzyme treatments might pave the way for either new treatments for celiac disease, or, new methods of processing rye for production of new, celiac-safe foods. SOURCE: Clinical & Experimental Immunology DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2249.2010.04119.x
  6. Celiac.com 03/19/2010 - Celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the gut triggered by an adverse immune response to dietary gluten proteins in genetically susceptible individuals. One of the first ways the body responds to offending proteins in an adverse celiac disease response is by producing mucous via IgA secretion in an effort to neutralize offending antigens and pathogens. A team of researchers recently sought to better document the relationships between immunoglobulin-coated bacteria and bacterial composition in feces of celiac disease patients, untreated and treated with a gluten-free diet (GFD) and healthy controls. The research team included Giada De Palma, Inmaculada Nadal, Marcela Medina, Ester Donat, Carmen Ribes-Koninckx, Miguel Calabuig, and Yolanda Sanz. They observed that intestinal dysbiosis and reduced immunoglobulin-coated bacteria are associated with celiac disease in children. Both untreated and treated celiac disease patients showed markedly lower levels of IgA, IgG and IgM-coated fecal bacteria compared to healthy controls. Celiac disease patients showed substantially reduced ratio of Gram-positive to Gram-negative bacteria compared to control subjects. Untreated celiac disease patients showed less abundant group proportions (P<0.050) of Bifidobacterium, Clostridium histolyticum, C. lituseburense and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii than did healthy controls. Untreated celiac disease patients showed more abundant group proportions (P<0.050) of Bacteroides-Prevotella than in control subjects. Both untreated and treated celiac disease patients showed significantly impoverished (P<0.050) levels of IgA coating the Bacteroides-Prevotella compared with healthy controls. From these results, the research team concluded that intestinal dysbiosis plays a role in reduced IgA-coating bacteria in celiac disease patients. This offers a fresh perspective into the possible relationships between the gut microbiota and the host defenses in celiac disease patients. Source: BMC Microbiology 2010, 24 February
  7. Diabetes Care 25: 1111-1116 Celiac.com 08/08/2002 - Dr. Anette-G. Ziegler, of the Academic Teaching Hospital Muenchen-Schwabing in Munich, Germany, and colleagues looked at seven first-degree relatives of patients who had type 1 diabetes and were under seven years of age and found that their titers of type 1 diabetes-associated autoantibodies did not improve after one year on a gluten-free diet. At the same time the subjects IgG antibody titers to gliadin were reduced. The researchers conclude that even though studies have shown that a gluten-free diet protects against autoimmune diabetes in animal models, it does not appear to do so in humans, although there is research that shows that it can reduce the frequency of type 1 diabetes in patients with celiac disease. According to the researchers, gluten is not the driving antigen for type 1 diabetes-associated islet autoimmunity.
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