Jump to content
Celiac Disease FAQ | This site uses cookies GDPR notice. Read more... ×
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'reflux'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Spring 2019 Issue
    • Winter 2019 Issue
    • Autumn 2018 Issue
    • Summer 2018 Issue
    • Spring 2018 Issue
    • Winter 2018 Issue
    • Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Summer 2017 Issue
    • Spring 2017 Issue
    • Winter 2017 Issue
    • Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Summer 2016 Issue
    • Spring 2016 Issue
    • Winter 2016 Issue
    • Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Summer 2015 Issue
    • Spring 2015 Issue
    • Winter 2015 Issue
    • Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Summer 2014 Issue
    • Spring 2014 Issue
    • Winter 2014 Issue
    • Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Summer 2013 Issue
    • Spring 2013 Issue
    • Winter 2013 Issue
    • Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Summer 2012 Issue
    • Spring 2012 Issue
    • Winter 2012 Issue
    • Autumn 2011 Issue
    • Summer 2011 Issue
    • Spring 2011 Issue
    • Spring 2006 Issue
    • Summer 2005 Issue
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
    • Lists of Diseases and Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Addison's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Anemia and Celiac Disease
    • Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia and Celiac Disease
    • Arthritis and Celiac Disease
    • Asthma and Celiac Disease
    • Ataxia, Nerve Disease, Neuropathy, Brain Damage and Celiac Disease
    • Attention Deficit Disorder and Celiac Disease
    • Autism and Celiac Disease
    • Bacterial Overgrowth and Celiac Disease
    • Cancer, Lymphoma and Celiac Disease
    • Candida Albicans and Celiac Disease
    • Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis) & Celiac Disease
    • Casein / Cows Milk Intolerance and Celiac Disease
    • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Cognitive Impairment and Celiac Disease
    • Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Depression and Celiac Disease
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Condition Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Diabetes and Celiac Disease
    • Down Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Dyspepsia, Acid Reflux and Celiac Disease
    • Epilepsy and Celiac Disease
    • Eye Problems, Cataract and Celiac Disease
    • Fertility, Pregnancy, Miscarriage and Celiac Disease
    • Fibromyalgia and Celiac Disease
    • Flatulence (Gas) and Celiac Disease
    • Gall Bladder Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Celiac Disease
    • Geographic Tongue (Glossitis) and Celiac Disease
    • Growth Hormone Deficiency and Celiac Disease
    • Heart Failure and Celiac Disease
    • Infertility, Impotency and Celiac Disease
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Intestinal Permeability and Celiac Disease
    • Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Kidney Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Liver Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Lupus and Celiac Disease
    • Malnutrition, Body Mass Index and Celiac Disease
    • Migraine Headaches and Celiac Disease
    • Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease
    • Myasthenia Gravis Celiac Disease
    • Obesity, Overweight & Celiac Disease
    • Osteoporosis, Osteomalacia, Bone Density and Celiac Disease
    • Psoriasis and Celiac Disease
    • Refractory Celiac Disease & Collagenous Sprue
    • Sarcoidosis and Celiac Disease
    • Scleroderma and Celiac Disease
    • Schizophrenia / Mental Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sepsis and Celiac Disease
    • Sjogrens Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Skin Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sleep Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Celiac Disease
    • Thyroid & Pancreatic Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Tuberculosis and Celiac Disease
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
    • United States of America: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Organizations
    • Outside the USA: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Contacts
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com
    • History of Celiac.com Updates Through October 2007
    • Your E-mail in Support of Celiac.com 1996 to 2006

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 12 results

  1. I had a rant here about 3 months ago after I received the results of my own biopsy, and was advised to go gluten free anyway, which I still haven't done but I'm experimenting with foods and hope to be gluten free soon. I wanted to come here and ask your advice again, because my dad had a biopsy about 4 weeks ago, the results of which came today, and I am so surprised to read they're negative. They told him it was very likely that he had celiac because his blood test was transglutaminase positive. He has low iron, low vitamin D, reflux, and his long-term symptoms of M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome which I know are also common symptoms of celiac. Everyone was sure he might have it, so I don't understand why his biopsy was "normal with no evidence" of the disease. The letter does however suggest further blood tests to see if he might develop celiac disease in the future. If his immune system is attacking and it's showing in his blood, doesn't that mean he's already developed it? Why would it do that if he didn't have celiac going on now? I've been encouraging him to try gluten free bread and biscuits but he's been reluctant, now he definitely won't. Should he? Or should he wave the whole thing off and continue eating his sandwiches like he did quite happily today? I guess they will tell him at the appointment. It's just so ridiculous because after he eats wheat he gets reflux! I was also counting on his results being positive... Sorry I'm rehashing my story now, but since 2011 I've had severe, chronic reflux that has gotten worse with time and has remained a mystery after a barium, manometry and two endoscopies; IBS; light headedness/heavy/cotton wool head with brain fog; headaches and jaw pain; muscle pain and severe weakness; sensitivity to noise, light, and heat, also the sun; fatigue and crashing after activity; bone pain; also severe acne that only responds to antibiotics; dry and flaky skin; brittle, cracked and peeling nails; year-round allergies, like having a mild cold permanently; and the occasional mouth ulcer and bleeding gums. The absolute worst is the reflux, followed by the IBS and then my head. I haven't been able to spin in a circle for years. I can't dance. Can't exercise. I feel so dizzy and sick all the time. Can't bend over or lie down with the reflux. Have cut out all acidic foods and FODMAPS. I am underweight. The reflux doesn't allow me to drink much water now because it feels like I have a little ocean of acid/bile sitting in my esophagus and drinking just adds more to it. So my throat has been so dry for months now. Barium and endoscopy both showed acid/bile sitting there, and a hernia. Manometry presumably showed no reason for reflux like a problem with the wave or a loose LES. But my blood work was negative and then my biopsy was negative. I cried on my friend's shoulder when I got that letter, and I've been counting on dad's results since. Now... Now what? I haven't heard from the hospital in 3 months, since my results came back. I don't know if they're waiting to figure out my father before figuring out me, or if they've discarded me. They told me I'm difficult. So I'm looking for gluten free foods but it's difficult without medical support, and being the only one in the house that wants to be gluten free, cross contamination is going to be a constant threat. Just persuading them to have a second toaster is a battle in itself. (Gluten free pancakes are all very well, but not if I put them in that toaster!) Honestly, I'm at my wits' end. I haven't been healthy since 2011. I'm only 28. I don't remember what it feels like to not have reflux, acid, bile; to eat anything with no pain or gas or toilet trips; to spin in a circle or go to amusement parks; what it feels like to have a clear head. I avoid sunny days. This was all triggered and set off at the end of 2011 by panic attacks and a hospital stay. Oh, I forgot to mention that my stools are often pale, like beech furniture (that might be a strange comparison!). I've really just... had it. So I'm not really sure what I'm asking... should we both go gluten free despite negative biopsies? Or might we just have M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, which my dad was diagnosed with 18 years ago? Thank you for reading!!
  2. This is my second thread within a few days, sorry it is long! My biopsy results came today, exactly 6 weeks after the endoscopy. They were "reported as normal." And I am honestly devastated. I've been crying all day. I needed those samples to come back positive, because I cannot - no, I will not - go on like this anymore. Some background: I had panic attacks in 2011 that eventually had me hospitalised with a heart rate of 170. After leaving the hospital I noticed I had constant indigestion and light headedness, symptoms that they assured me were due to the heart rate. When things calmed down, they said it was the beta blockers. After coming off the beta blockers, I started questioning my doctors why I had indigestion, acid reflux; why I was now light headed in the cinema, squinting and holding my head from the loud noise; why I was now sensitive to the sun, to light, to heat; and why I had symptoms of IBS. To cut a long story short, I've been getting treatment for IBS and especially the reflux since 2012, with absolutely no success. I've had every test and I now have a hiatal hernia and acid/bile in the esophagus constantly. I've also had muscle pain and severe weakness, and joint pain. After writing my doctor a letter last May, he suggested testing for celiac, as all my symptoms fit and my father had actually been found celiac positive in his last blood test, but my dad had no idea about that until very recently. I've had three blood tests - all negative. I've had a biopsy - negative. And I've been eating copious amount of bread and wheat for many months, and have never felt worse. The doctors tell me that the reflux will just stop on its own one day. I don't think that ever happens. I mentioned that my father had been diagnosed with M.E/Chronic fatigue syndrome in 2000, and that for a long time we've wondered if I might have inherited it. They didn't really say anything to that. I know it's not good to have celiac disease, but it has treatment, and it has hope. There are worse things to be diagnosed with, crohns, even M.E. There is no treatment for those. I don't want to have fundoplication surgery for the reflux and hernia, because it sounds awful and scary. The gastroenterologist didn't even think the surgery was necessary when I last spoke to her. But I really cannot go on with it, I refuse, so without a diagnosis of celiac, what's left for me to do? Just fundoplication. I was prepared to replace my food, was planning it. I've been researching for months. I even managed to delude myself into believing I have celiac. When my dad got a letter a couple of weeks ago about his last blood test being "strongly suggestive of coeliac disease," I hoped even harder. I thought it was a sign! I feel so foolish. Now I'll have to wait to see the gastroenterologist again to talk about... What? Fundoplication? She didn't even want to do it. She just shrugged and smiled and said I was a difficult patient. I'm going to see my dad's doctor this week, if I can, to talk about how likely it is that I might have celiac after all, regardless of my results, because of my dad's positive blood test, and to discuss the possibility I might have M.E/Chronic fatigue syndrome. In all honesty, I was prepared to look into M.E, until my dad's letter. Then I was even more certain my problem was gluten. Now they tell me, I have no problem with gluten. I feel SO ill right now, I can only describe it as "malaise." My head is light yet heavy, with pressure. My eyes are begging to close. My gut has been painful for over a week. I can feel acid reflux as always. My nails are cracked and peeling, as always. There is blood in my stools. My muscles are painful and so weak that I couldn't stretch out my arm while holding a mug without my arm feeling weak and wobbly. My legs were wobbling as I walked on Saturday. My gums feel as if there could be an ulcer. And I have acne, pale/yellow skin tone, and a headache is threatening. I just can't go on. Really thinking about giving up. I will try to go gluten free anyway, but my mum doesn't believe gluten is my problem and has been sceptical the whole time, so she is reluctant to learn about cross contamination in the kitchen. She just says it's not the problem and it's something else. I don't want to have NCGS because I don't think my doctors/gastroenterologists believe it exists. Thank you for any help :(.
  3. Hi, I've struggled with GI issues (IBS, GERD) and poly-cystic ovarian syndrome for the last 5-6 years (I am 26). My reflux has been continually getting worse and my doctor was concerned since I take high doses of Zantac. They referred me to specialty clinic for endoscopy. During my EGD doctor noticed lots of inflammation and he left a note stating that my villi in small intestine were flat. Only post op notes were to wait for the biopsy results of duodenum and along stomach; and to try another med. I've been having a lot of fatigue and easy bruising the last few months on top of worsening reflux. I've been primary surviving on chicken, bread, carrots...but it wasn't helping like it normally seemed to. Last week I started having joint pain that moves and comes/goes, as well as tingling in my hands and feet. After the tingling/joint pain started I stopped eating gluten/complex carbs because I thought maybe it was related to blood sugar; reflux is a little better but joint pain is not. Does this sound familiar to anyone? I had some blood work done for vitamins/minerals and liver function. Nurse over phone said it seems within normal limits; but that my liver function was on the lowest end of normal (AST =10). I have an appointment with my regular doctor tomorrow; as of Friday they didn't have my results but they wanted to follow up on joint pain/tingling.
  4. Celiac.com 04/20/2016 - People with celiac disease very often have reflux symptoms. A team of researchers recently set out to evaluate mucosal integrity and motility of the lower esophagus as possible contributors to reflux symptoms in patients with celiac disease. The research team included María Inés Pinto-Sánchez, Fabio D. Nachman, Claudia Fuxman, Guido Iantorno, Hui Jer Hwang, Andrés Ditaranto, Florencia Costa, Gabriela Longarini, Xuan Yu Wang, Xianxi Huang, Horacio Vázquez, María L. Moreno, Sonia Niveloni, Premysl Bercik, Edgardo Smecuol, Roberto Mazure, Claudio Bilder, Eduardo C. Mauriño, Elena F. Verdu, and Julio C. Bai. They are variously affiliated with the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, the Department of Medicine, "Dr. Carlos Bonorino Udaondo" Gastroenterology Hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Favaloro University Hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Consejo de Investigación en Salud, MSAL, Gobierno de la Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina, and with the Gastroenterology Chair, Universidad del Salvador in Buenos Aires, Argentina. For their study, they enrolled newly diagnosed celiac disease patients with and without reflux symptoms, non-celiac patients with classical reflux disease (GERD), and control subjects, who had no reflux symptoms. Using both light microscopy and electron microscopy, they assessed endoscopic biopsies from the distal esophagus for dilated intercellular space (DIS). They used qRT-PC to determine tight junction (TJ) mRNA proteins expression for zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-2 and claudin-3 (CLDN-2; CLDN-3). Overall, patients with active celiac disease showed higher DIS scores than controls, and similar to GERD patients. They found altered DIS even in celiac disease patients without reflux symptoms, who had normalized after one year of a gluten-free diet. Celiac disease patients with and without reflux symptoms had lower expression of ZO-1 than controls. Celiac disease and GERD patients showed similar expression of CLDN-2 and CLDN-3. This study shows that patients with active celiac disease have altered esophageal mucosal integrity, independent of any reflux symptoms. Loss of TJ integrity in the esophageal mucosa may result from altered expression of ZO-1, which may contribute to the development of reflux symptoms. Source: Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1980686, 9 pages
  5. Hello folks, I'm looking for some advice on whether or not people have had similar symptoms/on-set that eventually led them to the Celiac diagnosis. So 8 weeks ago I started feeling lethargic, short of breath and I was having heartburn (but I'd never had it before, to my knowledge, so I didn't know what it was). Prior to this, I was also transitioning out of a phase of high fat, low carbohydrate diet (ketogenic) which I did to lose weight. I've done this type of diet for months at a time, several times, and I've always had more energy, felt great, and lost weight, I always felt worst when I would go back on carbs. So the warning sign of not tolerating carbs was there I guess, and to be honest it was carbs - pizza, pasta, rice, chips; I rarely ate sugar in terms of sweet things or fruit in general in life, not even soda. 3 weeks later, after a few beers, I threw up violently and had massive acid reflux symptoms which affected my throat, breathing, everything; I was diagnosed with mild antral gastritis and grade B GERD, as confirmed by a GI scope procedure. I responded really well to PPI/antacid treatments, which I still use. I changed my diet completely: removing alcohol, coffee, spicy food, etc... I've had little or no acid symptoms since treatment started. During this whole period I was having constipation problems -- and then water stools -- then back to C, and I also lost 2 stone in weight: or 28 pounds, mostly in a 5 week period. Now, week 8, I have gained back my appetite and 12 pounds of the 24 lost and my bowel movements have become stable (but not normal, for me). However, some things have persisted or have been left unexplained: I had pain in my pelvis, lymph node swelling in my groin and lymph node swelling in my left armpit which was painful. They come and go, but the armpit sometimes flares up 20-30 minutes after eating. I also have discomfort in my bowel region, but it's not like spasms with D. It comes and goes with bowel movements. I now go to the toilet much more regularly; it used to be usually every second day, now it's 2-3 times per day and it's a lot more than it used to be. mostly normal looking stools but sometimes hard little rocks. I get a small painless flat rash of red dots on my hands, upper side, near the thumbs usually; sometimes 20-30 minutes after eating (once co-incidentally with armpit swelling). Also it happens sometimes when I'm passing stools. I've noticed this rash appear with: eating a lot of whole wheat bread; eating chocolate chip cookies, eating french fries. The rash disappears usually after 30-40 minutes; it doesn't happen every day but at least every second day. I've checked for other rashes but haven't found any. I have constant mouth ulcers and my gums are inflamed often. My pee has not been the same. It's darker but not outside of normal yellow ranges. But, I used to mostly pee clear completely, as it were water, for my whole life in living memory. Now, I pee and it's always yellow, usually very pale yellow inside normal ranges. But, it's different for me. My blood test from when this started has shown slightly elevated bilirubin level (by only 1 point, so the doctor effectively discounted it as being significant); My blood tests have also shown very slightly high neutrophil levels, which I think have gone down since GERD treatment. All other tests are normal. I have a dry mouth often, I drink a ton of water. Since this all happened, I have dry eyes and got prescribed eye drops. I've always had perfect vision before now and don't wear glasses or anything. Also, my skin on my face is very dry. I still suffer from fatigue and shortness of breath. I did have a lot of burping and passing gas at the height of the gastritis; now, however, that has gone away and things are normal. I also don't have stomach pains often or D, or even C now. I asked the GP in my most recent visit, if they thought I could have a food intolerance: they said that I'd likely have a rash everywhere and it would itch. Plus, I've never had a food intolerance to anything or allergy in my life until now... I'm 24, 5'8, 10 stone 6 pounds, M. No underlying health issues. I was in decent physical shape before all of this. So my questions are: 1) could this be celiac: did you guys have any of these weirder symptoms like lymph node, dry eyes, higher bilirubin, shortness of breath? 2) I don't have D and C often anymore in spite of going to the toilet more often, does this rule out Celiac? 3) My plan was to eliminate gluten for a week or two, and see if my fatigue, libido, urine colour and other symptoms go back to normal. If that happens, I plan to re-introduce gluten and insist on testing. Would you recommend this? I don't believe my GP is convinced of testing now. I am continuing to see doctors to rule out other causes, but this is one that I feel may be secretly behind some of my symptoms. Thanks in advance!
  6. Hi to all. I'm new on this, and i want to share something: Male, 29 years. Right now i'm on a non-gluten diet. Feeling relatively well. Healthy. Lots of tests, all of them went normal. Before this, i was living for some time with an array of 'strange' and 'unrelated' symptoms. Strange and unrelated, because at that moment i didn't have information about the celiac thing. So: 1) Acutte anxiety, some kind of generalized-anxiety-disorder. Panic attacks, from time to time. 2) Abdominal distension, with strange noises. Diarrhea, with mucus, 2-3 times per day, alternated with constipation, every few weeks. Lots of belching (a lot) 3) Uncomfortable and disgusting palpitations after dinner, on a daily basis. Specially after large meals with carbs. With no pain, thankfully. Just the akward sensation. 4) A little overweight. Around 11 KG. 5) Mild insomnia. 6) The most notorius: Acid reflux, pyrosis, after every meal. All of this disappeared very quickly, after the first 10 days on the diet. The mild overweight also, after a few weeks. Thoughts on this? Anyone going trough something like this? It feels strange.
  7. Celiac.com 05/21/2015 - Some studies have indicated higher rates of reflux in patients with celiac disease, but there hasn't really been any clear data on the risk for celiac disease in patients presenting with reflux. A team of researchers recently set out to determine rates of celiac disease in patients with GORD, and to better understand the nature of reflux symptoms in newly diagnosed celiac disease patients. The research team included P.D. Mooney, K.E. Evans, M. Kurien, A.D. Hopper, and D.S. Sanders. They are affiliated with the Regional GI and Liver Unit, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, South Yorks, UK. The team divided the patients into groups as follows: Group A included 3368 patients who had undergone routine duodenal biopsy, and prospectively recruited between 2004 and 2014. Researchers compared these results with those of a screening control group. Group B included 32 patients with newly diagnosed celiac disease who had undergone esophageal manometry and 24-h pH studies, prospectively recruited. The results showed the following: Of the 3368 patients in Group A who received routine duodenal biopsy, 850 (25.2%) presented with GORD. Rates of celiac disease among GORD patients was just 1.3% (0.7-2.4%), about the same as in the general population (P=0.53). Routine duodenal biopsy at endoscopy showed that reflux was negatively associated with celiac disease, with an adjusted odds ratio of 0.12 (0.07-0.23), P<0.0001. In group B, about one third of patients complained of reflux. Manometry showed that just under 10% had a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter, and 40.6% had esophageal motor abnormalities, with 25% showing significant hypocontraction. Also, pH study did show that one in three did in fact suffer reflux episodes. The main takeaway from this study is that GORD patients have undiagnosed celiac disease at about the same rate as the general population, and so routine duodenal biopsy cannot be recommended for patients with GORD. Interestingly, pH/manometry studies showed a fairly high percentage of newly diagnosed celiac patients with reflux and/or esophageal dysmotility; which might explain the high prevalence of reflux symptoms in celiac disease. Source: Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2015 Jun;27(6):692-7. doi: 10.1097/MEG.0000000000000359.
  8. Hello! I want to start by saying that this is a great group of people (based on posts i read) and I am very grateful for any help and insight from you all. I am a mother of a 1.5 year old girl. I myself am a Type 1 diabetic and I have brother who is Type 1. Type 1 and Celiac are known to coincide so I have been tested before but was negative. My daughter has had tummy problems from nearly the start and I am wondering if she could also have an autoimmune disease--Celiac.... She was diagnosed with reflux at 3 months old (screaming, spitting up, arching her back). She was put on 2 reflux meds which did not help much. She went from breastfed, to formula (screaming got worse) and finally we put her on Soy Formula and that seemed to help at first. She was still having terrible bouts of gas and constipation. After she turned 1, we tried milk again-as the doctor suggested- and after a month she began to vomit every day and have painful gas. We took away all milk products and she is not throwing up, but she has 1-2 diarrhea stools EVERY day. It smells HORRIBLE!! And she has painful gas a few times a week. She tends to run a low grade fever and will have unexplained high fevers a couple times a month (102-104 degrees) with no symptoms. Her CBC is perfect, she is still chubby, and her stool tested negative for bacteria (although blood was present in the stool). I feel like her pediatrician thinks I'm just a little dramatic at this point but I feel like i should have her tested for Celiac. I have no known family history--just the Type 1 diabetes (and I don't know if that puts my child more at risk). Any advice? Does this sound similar to any one else's experience?
  9. Celiac.com 06/28/2013 - Celiac disease has been linked to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), but there is very little data from population-based studies on the rates of shared disease among these groups. To get a better picture of the issue, a team of researchers recently set out to conduct a population-based study on rates of celiac disease in people with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). The research team included Jonas F. Ludvigsson, Pertti Aro, Marjorie M. Walker, Michael Vieth, Lars Agréus, Nicholas J. Talley, Joseph A. Murray, and Jukka Ronkainen. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine at Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, in Stockholm, Sweden, the Department of Pediatrics at Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden, the Departments of Medicine and Immunology in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, USA, the Department of NVS, Center for Family and Community Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, the Faculty of Health at the University of Newcastle in Newcastle, Australia, the Institute of Pathology in Bayreuth, Germany, the Primary Health Care Center of Tornio, Finland, and the Institute of Health Sciences at the University of Oulu in Oulu, Finland. For their study, the team conducted endoscopes on a thousand randomly selected adults from the general population. They defined celiac disease as positive serology together with mucosal abnormalities of the small intestine. They defined any eosinophil infiltration of the esophageal epithelium as esophageal eosinophilia and EoE was defined as having at least 15 eosinophils/high-power field in biopsies from the distal esophagus. They used Fisher's exact test to compare the prevalence of GORD, esophageal eosinophilia, and EoE in subjects with celiac disease, and to compare the realists with those of the control group. Of the 400 subjects (40%) with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GORS), 155 (15.5%) had erosive esophagitis, 16 (1.6%) had Barrett's esophagus, 48 (4.8%) had esophageal eosinophilia, and 11 (1.1%) had EoE. They diagnosed celiac disease in eight (2%) of the 400 individuals with GORS, compared to 10 of 600, or 1.7% for the control group (p = 0.81). They also diagnosed celiac disease in 3 of 155 subjects (1.9%) with erosive esophagitis, compared with 15 of 845 (1.7%) of control subjects (p = 0.75); and 2 cases of celiac disease from the 48 (4.2%) individuals with esophageal eosinophilia (controls were 16 of 952 (1.7%), p = 0.21). They found no celiac disease, however, in any of the 16 subjects with Barrett's esophagus, while they did find 18 cases among the 984, or 1.8% of control subjects; p = 1.0. Nor did they find celiac disease in any of the 11 individuals with EoE, compared with 18 cases in the 989, or 1.8% of control subjects; p = 1.0. Because this population-based showed no increased risk of celiac disease among individuals with GORD, esophageal eosinophilia, or EoE, they conclude that there is no need to conduct celiac screening of individuals with GORD, or EoE screening of individuals with celiac disease. Source: Informa Healthcare. doi:10.3109/00365521.2013.792389
  10. Celiac.com 12/16/2011 - To date, symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) - heartburn and acid regurgitation - have been among the only GI symptoms absent from the list of common manifestations of celiac disease. They are usually definitive indicators of gastric acid reflux. But a report from Julio César Bai's group in Buenos Aires notes that at the time of diagnosis, patients with celiac disease were more likely to complain of GERD symptoms than healthy controls. Moreover, maintaining a gluten free diet alleviated these symptoms. Their results are reported in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.GERD is a chronic condition usually resulting from the reflux of acidic stomach contents up into the esophagus. It is commonly treated with proton pump inhibitors, but some cases are refractory to this treatment. There has been conflicting data as to whether GERD symptoms are more common in people with celiac, and whether a gluten free diet might help. Dr. Bai's group designed a two pronged study to answer these questions: They undertook a cross sectional analysis of 133 people upon their diagnosis with celiac over the course of 2005, and a longitudinal assessment of 53 of them as they maintained a gluten free diet over the next four years. At the time of their diagnosis, the proportion of celiac with reflux was six-fold higher than that in the the 70 healthy controls included in the study. Interestingly, more severe reflux symptoms were associated with the classical, rather than the silent, presentation of celiac disease. However, it should be noted that this was somewhat of a selected population; these data were obtained from patients coming to a malabsorption clinic, where the classic presentation of celiac is more prevalent than the silent type. Moreover, for whatever reason, these healthy volunteers had less GERD symptoms than is usually reported. After three months on a gluten free diet symptoms were comparable to those seen in healthy controls. Interestingly, though, this was the case for patients who reported only partially complying to a gluten free diet as well as those who adhered to it strictly. Because these symptoms are alleviated upon assumption of a gluten free diet, the authors hypothesize that they might be caused by a nontraditional mechanism in celiac patients rather than by actual reflux. One suggestion they posit is reduced upper gastrointestinal motility, and another is a permeability defect in the stratified esophageal epithelium. In an editorial accompanying the paper, delayed gastric emptying and disturbed neuroendocrine control of upper GI function are floated potentially contributing to GERD symptoms in untreated celiac. Further research would have to be done to bear out these and other ideas. Nachman F, Vázquez H, González A, Andrenacci P, Compagni L, Reyes H, Sugai E, Moreno ML, Smecuol E, Hwang HJ, Sánchez IP, Mauriño E, Bai JC. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in patients with celiac disease and the effects of a gluten-free diet. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2011 Mar;9(3):214-9. Epub 2010 Jun 30. Source: Leffler DA, Kelly CP. Celiac disease and gastroesophageal reflux disease: yet another presentation for a clinical chameleon. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2011 Mar;9(3):192-3. Epub 2010 Dec 8.
  11. Celiac.com 11/21/2008 - Not much is known about what effects, if any, a gluten-free diet might have upon gastroesophageal reflux disease-related symptoms (GERD-rs) in people with celiac disease. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the recurrence of GERD-rs, in celiac patients with nonerosive reflux disease (NERD). Out of a total of 105 adult patients with celiac disease, the team found 29 with celiac disease who presented with the NERD. Those 29 were enrolled in the study, and compared against a control group of thirty non-celiac patients with NERD. After 8 weeks of PPI treatment the team found that 25 (86.2%) celiac patients saw GERD-rs resolve, compared to just 20 (66.7%) control subjects. The team used clinical means to assess recurrence of GERD-rs at 6, 12, 18, and 24-month intervals after initial proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment were withdrawn for 8 weeks. In the celiac disease group, just five patients (20%) had a recurrence of GERD-rs at 6 months, but none had recurrence at 12, 18, and 24 months, while the control group showed recurrence in six of 20 controls (30%) at 6 months, in another six (12/20, 60%) at 12 months, in another three (15/20, 75%) at 18 months, and in another two (17/20, 85%) at 24 months. This is the first study to evaluate the effect of a gluten free diet in the nonerosive form of GERD in patients with celiac disease, via a clinical long-term follow-up, and the results suggest that a gluten free diet could be helpful reducing GERD symptoms and in preventing of their recurrence. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008;23(9):1368-1372.
  12. Celiac.com 03/04/2011 - Celiac disease is similar to the inflammatory bowel diseases, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, in the obvious sense that all are chronic inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. But more than that, they all also present daily psychological and social challenges to patients’ lifestyles. In a recent study reported in the European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, researchers in the United Kingdom examined the prevalence of GI symptoms in patients with these diseases and correlated the incidence of these symptoms with quality of life (QoL). Not surprisingly, they found that increased severity of reflux and irritable bowel syndrome were associated with a diminished QoL. Patients with celiac disease had worse symptoms and QoL than those with ulcerative colitis, but they were better off than people with Crohn’s disease. This cross-sectional study was performed by sending patients surveys through the mail. One thousand and thirty-one people were included; 225 patients with celiac, 228 with ulcerative colitis, 230 with Crohn’s disease, and 348 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. As this was a postal survey, there is a potential inclusion bias – it is possible that those patients faring the worst would be most likely to send back the questionnaires. Seventy one percent of the celiac patients reported adhering to a gluten-free diet, but this was not corroborated endoscopically. One of the surveys assessed physical and mental QoL and another considered depression and anxiety. Participants were also asked to report and rate GI symptoms they had experienced over the past month, including reflux, heartburn, regurgitation, belching, dysphagia (difficulty swallowing), and retrosternal pain. Barrat et al. found that the celiac patients had higher rates of belching and dysphagia than inflammatory bowel diseases sufferers in this study and also than reported previously. They highlight that despite the high (71%) degree of adherence to the gluten-free diet, 22% of celiac patients still reported severe enough IBS symptoms to affect their QoL. They infer from this finding a couple of noteworthy things. First, that the gluten-free diet may not adequately control IBS symptoms in celiac patients. But also, that doctors are perhaps not inquiring about reflux and IBS during consultations, or patients are under-reporting their prevalence. The authors thus suggest that QoL might be improved for these patients if doctors were more diligent in assessing them for reflux and irritable bowel syndrome. Source: European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology: February 2011 - Volume 23 - Issue 2 - p 159–165
×