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Found 4 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/26/2019 - The Food and Drink Federation (FDF) is a support group that advocates for the food and non-alcoholic drink manufacturing industry, and certain food sectors in the UK. Seeking to provide clarity for consumers and consistency for manufacturers over gluten labeling, the FDF recently issued a set of product labeling guidelines called the Gluten Labeling Guidance: Best Practice for Pre-packed Foods which Include or Exclude Cereals Containing Gluten. The FDF guidelines address various labeling scenarios, with special attention to oat and wheat types. The guidelines include information about the differences between celiac disease and cereal allergy, advice on precautionary allergen labeling, and flow charts for making claims about gluten absence in a given product. They also include an overview of the relevant EU and UK laws and policies. Consumers rely on labels in order to make safe, informed choices about packaged foods. For consumers with food allergies or sensitivities, labels become even more important. Did the food originally contain gluten ingredients? Is it naturally gluten-free? Is it produced in a dedicated facility? For these and other reasons, it is crucial for manufacturers to label their products in compliance with law. That's where FDF comes in. FDF is committed to providing best-practice regulatory guidance, and looks for its new, more comprehensive guidelines to help food manufacturers, large and small, to make safe, informed choices for their package labels, says Alex Turtle, food law, labeling and enforcement manager, FDF. The march toward clear, consistent and helpful package labeling for gluten-free and other foods is an ongoing affair, but the FDF's latest guidelines represent a small victory for all sides in the world of gluten-free foods. The new guidelines are supported by Coeliac UK, Anaphylaxis Campaign, the British Retail Consortium and the Gluten Free Industry Association. Read more at IFST.org
  2. Celiac.com 05/17/2010 - Finding gluten-free food is hard enough without having to worry if your "gluten-free" labeled food is really gluten-free. For those of us that become increasingly ill from ingesting a small amount of gluten, improper food labeling can be a matter of life or death. Since 2007, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been contemplating potential revisions for the current “gluten-free” labeling of foods by food manufacturers. As the FDA requirements currently stand, there is very little protection for celiacs and gluten sensitive sufferers. However the new law, if approved, will require companies labeling their products as “gluten-free” to guarantee that their product is completely free of wheat, rye, barley, and oats and any crossbred hybrids or fillers containing wheat, rye or barley or oats, that do not test at less than 20 ppm for gluten. Meanwhile as we gluten-sensitive American's continue to wait patiently for a final resolve for the FDA requirements for gluten, Canadians are actively revising their labeling regulations for gluten-free. Health Canada has proposed changes in the current labeling regulations for gluten-free. According to the Canadian Food and Drug Regulations, “No person shall label, package, sell or advertise a food in a manner likely to create an impression that it is a gluten-free food unless the food does not contain wheat, including spelt and kamut, or oats, barley, rye or triticale or any part thereof.” Additionally the words, “gluten-free” is not permitted on any packaged foods containing oats; even if the oats are uncontaminated. Health Canada is now seeking input from Canadian citizens and shareholders on the proposed labeling regulations to help share information which will aid in the development of proposed changes. The Health Canada website is open to the public for comments from May 13, 2010 until July 11, 2010. For more information on the proposed revisions of Canadian gluten-free labeling, please visit the Health Canada website at: Health CanadaSource: Marketwire
  3. Celiac.com 07/24/2001 - In an effort to make food ingredient labels easier for everyone to understand, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is currently revising its food labeling laws. If Congress passes the current proposed legislation it will make life much easier for those with food allergies and intolerance. The Food Allergy Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN) spearheaded the yearlong label revision project and worked with 18 food companies to create voluntary guidelines for food labels that will help consumers avoid foods that could trigger an allergic reaction. The current recommended FAAN guidelines will identify the top eight allergens that cause 90 percent of food allergies, and will also avoid the use of technical food language in favor of easier to understand terms. For example, instead of using simply natural flavors on labels, the new labels would include the source of the ingredient: natural peanut or milk flavor. According to the guidelines common allergens such as peanuts, tree nuts like walnuts and pecans, fish, shellfish, eggs, milk, soy, and wheat should be clearly identified on all labels. On a positive note, the new FAAN guidelines have been voluntarily adopted by certain companies within the food industry for the benefit of the allergic consumer. Numerous consumer complaints and calls from the 6-7 million people in the USA with food allergies, not to mention the fear of lawsuits from the 150-200 people that die each year from them, were certainly motivating factors for them taking this important step. In any case, any change in food labeling practice would have to be an improvement over the present situation. The new FAAN guidelines, however, amount to only recommendations at this point, although Kelloggs and General Mills and several other companies have already adopted them. Legislation incorporating the FAAN guidelines has been proposed by representative Nita M. Lowey (D-NY) , which, if passed, would make them federal law in the USA. To encourage a stronger version of the proposed new labeling laws, contact your representatives now about this important issue!
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