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Found 10 results

  1. Celiac.com 01/29/2018 - Researchers suspect that certain environmental factors, including infectious agents, might play a role in making celiac disease more prevalent and more widespread. Researchers in the USA and Sweden studying regional variation in the frequency of celiac disease have found similarities in the geographic distribution of Lyme disease, an emerging multisystemic infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete, which invites questions about a possible connection with celiac disease. One research team recently set out to determine if infection with Borrelia contributes to an increased risk of celiac disease. The research team included Armin Alaedini, Benjamin Lebwohl, Gary P. Wormser, Peter H. Green, and Jonas F. Ludvigsson. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY USA; the Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY USA; the Institute of Human Nutrition, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY USA; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY USA; the Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; and with the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. Using biopsy reports, the team identified 15,769 individuals with celiac disease. By linking to the nationwide Patient Register, they were able to compare the rate of earlier occurrence of Lyme disease in the patients with celiac disease to that in 78,331 matched controls. To further assess the temporal relationship between Borrelia infection and celiac disease, they also examined the risk of subsequent Lyme disease in patients with a diagnosis of celiac disease. The team found that twenty-five patients with celiac disease had a prior diagnosis of Lyme disease (0.16%), whereas 79 had a subsequent diagnosis of Lyme disease (0.5%). This showed a modest association between Lyme disease and celiac disease was seen both before and after celiac diagnosis, with celiac risk being highest in the first year of follow-up. So, only a small portion of the celiac disease patients had a prior diagnosis for Lyme disease. The research team asserts that the supposed association between Lyme disease and celiac disease, both before and after the diagnosis of celiac disease, is likely driven by surveillance bias, at least in part. These data show that patients with Borrelia infection do not face a substantially higher risk for developing celiac disease. Source: BMC Med. 2017; 15: 169. doi: 10.1186/s12916-017-0926-1. PMCID: PMC5599869
  2. Celiac.com 12/19/2016 - Research conducted with high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) has documented substantial bone micro-architecture in premenopausal women with newly diagnosed celiac disease. A team of researchers recently set out to assess changes in bone micro-architecture after 1 year on a gluten-free diet in a cohort of pre-menopausal women. The research team included MB Zanchetta, V Longobardi, F Costa, G Longarini, RM Mazure, ML Moreno, H Vázquez, F Silveira, S Niveloni, E Smecuol, Temprano M de la Paz, F Massari, E Sugai, A González, EC Mauriño, C Bogado, JR Zanchetta, and JC Bai. They are variously affiliated with the Instituto de Diagnóstico e Investigaciones Metabólicas (IDIM), Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Sección Intestino Delgado, Departamento de Medicina at the Hospital de Gastroenterología "Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo” in Buenos Aires, Argentina; and with the Cátedra de Gastroenterología Facultad de Medicina and the Cátedra de Osteología y Metabolismo Mineral at the Universidad del Salvador in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Their team prospectively enrolled 31 consecutive females upon celiac diagnosis, and reassessed 26 of them after 1 year of gluten-free diet. All patients received HRpQCT scans of distal radius and tibia, areal BMD by DXA, and bone-specific parameters and celiac serology both times. The team then compared 1-year results against data from a control group of healthy pre-menopausal women of similar age and BMI in order to assess whether the micro-architectural parameters of treated celiac patients matched values expected for their age. Compared with baseline, the trabecular compartment in the distal radius and tibia showed marked improvement of trabecular density, trabecular/bone volume fraction [bV/TV] [p < 0.0001], and trabecular thickness [p = 0.0004]. Trabecular number remained stable in both regions. Cortical density increased only in the tibia (p = 0.0004). Cortical thickness decreased significantly in both sites (radius: p = 0.03; tibia: p = 0.05). DXA increased in all regions (lumbar spine [LS], p = 0.01; femoral neck [FN], p = 0.009; ultradistal [uD] radius, p = 0.001). Most parameters continued to be significantly lower than those of healthy controls. This prospective HRpQCT study showed that most trabecular parameters altered at celiac disease diagnosis improved significantly with a gluten-free diet, along with calcium and vitamin D supplementation. However, there were still significant differences with a control group of women of similar age and BMI. The team plans a prospective follow-up, in which they expect to be able to assess whether bone micro-architecture matches levels expected for a given patient's age. Source: J Bone Miner Res. 2016 Jul 22. doi: 10.1002/jbmr.2922.
  3. Lactose intolerance is frequently a side effect of celiac disease. Celiacs who eat gluten become lactose intolerant after the villi and microvilli in their small intestine become damaged, and are no longer capable of catching and breaking down the lactose molecule. The problem usually disappears when celiacs remove gluten from their diet, which allows the damaged villi and microvilli to grow back. Lactose intolerance symptoms can continue for a long time after a celiac has gone on a 100% gluten-free diet. In some cases the villi and microvilli damage can take up to two years to heal completely, but in most cases it takes between six months and a year. Most people who are lactose intolerant can usually eat goat and sheep (feta) cheeses without any problems.
  4. Celiac.com 03/24/2010 - Celiac disease is a permanent intolerance to gluten ingestion, which is predisposed in individuals with human leukocyte antigen (HLA ) and DQ2 or DQ8 haplotype. Celiac is an autoimmune disease and there has been mounting evidence indicating a substantial connection between celiac and other autoimmune disorders such as, autoimmune thyroiditis and diabetes mellitus type 1. Additionally, recent evidence has surfaced correlating a relationship between celiac and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). An Italian study was designed to research a gene commonly associated with celiac disease known as MYO IXB, which was recently found to be mutated in IBD patients as well. Additionally, the chromosome 4q27 region is also associated with celiac disease and other autoimmune diseases, and predisposes patients to ulcerative colitis, indicating a common genetic code for these diseases. Although, other IBD risk factors were not found to be candidate genes for celiac disease. Italian patients with IBD were tested for celiac disease and their results were lower than expected, and lower than compared with the general population. celiac disease was found to be more prevalent in patients with ulcerative colitis than in those with Crohn's disease. Ulcerative colitis is typically isolated to the colon and is not present in the small intestine. However, there have been reports of diffuse duodenitis in ulcerative colitis patients which is sometimes mistaken for celiac disease. The gastroduodenal association with Crohn's disease varies from 30% to 80% of patients. Celiac disease and inflammatory bowel are not related, they are merely two diseases that sometimes cross the same path. While the prevalence of celiac disease in Italian IBD patients was typically low indicating no close relationship between celiac disease and inflammatory bowl disease, the mutual relationship of these diseases lies in the fact that patients with both conditions frequently share a history of iron-deficient anemia. It is thus important for patients that are unresponsive to treatments for IBD and are prone to incessant anemia, to also test for celiac disease. Source: Science Direct
  5. Among celiacs and their relatives, there appears to be a higher incidence of other disorders related to the immune system. A partial listing of these includes insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (type I), Graves disease, Addisons disease, scleroderma, chronic active hepatitis, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Sjogrens syndrome. In addition, a gluten-free diet appears to have helped some individuals with autism, chronic fatigue syndrome (myalgic encephalomyelitis or ME, PVS, post viral fatigue syndrome or PVFS), attention deficit disorder (ADD), and ADHD; though it is by no means a cure for any of these. For more information on this topic visit the Related Disorders page.
  6. Scand J Gastroenterol 1999 Sep;34(9):909-14 AW Morrow Gastroenterology and Liver Centre, Dept of Histopathology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. SPECIAL NOTE: European Codex Alimentarius quality wheat starch was used in this study. (Celiac.com 06/25/2000) BACKGROUND: It is expected that in patients with coeliac disease the small bowel mucosal mucosa will return to normal if they adhere to a gluten-free diet (GFD). However, in many this is not the case. This study aims to determine whether this persistent villous atrophy (VA) could be due to continued ingestion of the trace amounts of gluten in gluten-free foods, as defined by the WHO/FAO Codex Alimentarius. METHODS: Duodenal biopsy specimens from 89 adults with long-standing coeliac disease were examined, and the findings correlated with their form of gluten-free diet. RESULTS: In 51 subjects the duodenal specimen was normal, whereas in 38 there was villous atrophy (partial, 28; subtotal, 8; total, 2). There was no relationship between the presence or absence of VA and ingestion of either a GFD as defined by the Codex Alimentarius (Codex-GFD; 39 patients) or a GFD that contained no detectable gluten (NDG diet: 50 patients). Intraepithelial lymphocyte counts were higher, and lactase levels lower, in subjects with an abnormal biopsy specimen than in those in whom it was normal. However, within each of these biopsy groups there was no difference in these variables between patients on a Codex-GFD and those on an NDG-GFD. IgA antigliadin antibody was detected in 4 of 29 patients on a Codex-GFD and in 3 of 13 on a NDG-GFD (NS). CONCLUSION: The persistent mucosal abnormalities seen in patients with coeliac disease on a GFD are not due to the ingestion of trace amounts of gluten. The consequences of these abnormalities have yet to be determined.
  7. Celiac.com 06/08/2010 - Paul Seelig of Durham, owner of Great Specialty Products; a bread company that claimed to manufacture gluten-free bread which actually contained gluten and made many people sick, is now facing additional indictments for false murder implications. Selling, 48, is facing nine felony fraud charges for selling gluten contaminated bread which he claimed was gluten-free. People began complaining about Seelig's bread products after getting sick from them, which led state state officials to close Seelig's business in January, and arrest Seelig on criminal charges in February. In March, State School Board member Kathy Taft was raped and left for dead. She later died, and almost two months after that Jason K. Williford was charged with Kathy Taft's rape and murder. Prosecutors said that Seelig volunteered information about Taft's killer to barter for reducing or dismissing his felony charges. Seelig implicated a former co-worker who was entirely innocent, and had no connection to Taft's murder. On Monday, Seelig was expected to plead guilty to his felony charges and accept a plea deal, but he refused. Instead, Wake Superior Court Judge Donald Stephens arraigned Seelig on felony charges, is seeking additional indictments against Seelig for false murder accusations, and at the prosecutors request raised Seelig's bond to 750,000. Sources: NewsObserver.com News-Record.com
  8. Celiac.com 11/03/2009 - Many infants, toddlers and young children are either born with or develop a variety of protein allergies with symptoms including anaphylaxis, intolerance or sensitivity to milk, egg, shellfish, crustacean, peanuts, nuts, sesame seeds, soy and gluten. These symptoms can manifest themselves in a variety of ways including coeliac (celiac) disease (gut damage), eczema, shock, migraines, headaches, crankiness, aggression, depression, listlessness, chronic fatigue, irritable bowel, wind, flatulence, diarrhea, bloating, fluid retention, poor growth patterns, feeling vaguely and sometimes seriously unwell: a general failure to thrive.Unfortunately, we do not understand all the reasons. There are nutritional, neurological and hormonal implications, which often go unconsidered, to many of the foods we eat. In some instances, with babies, the problems are transmitted via the mother’s breast milk and there are many instances of babies, for example plainly uncomfortable at being entirely covered in a painful rash due to their reactions to gluten and other foods in their mother’s diets. Such problems are more common where there is a history of asthma, colic, gluten sensitivity and other immune system issues in the family. In other instances, the problems may be caused by too early an introduction of solid foods and food types and in some cases by simple over exposure to particular food categories. These issues require awareness and careful observation on the part of the mother to try and relate/identify the problem foods to the problems in the child. In some instances, these problems may also overlap with lactose intolerance, fructose malabsorption and other fermentable sugar issues. There can also be cumulative issues with preservatives and the histamines in chocolate/cocoa and orange juice. Histamines and gluten, either singly or in combination, can both contribute to headache, migraine and behavioral problems. I recall one young mother, the wife of a colleague, who found that her normally happy and contented baby son reacted negatively to the coffee, cabbage, curry, chocolate, pasta and occasional alcohol in her diet – all foods his mother enjoyed, particularly the chocolate - by becoming red in the face, grizzly, plainly uncomfortable and often with diarrhea. Fortunately, she was perceptive enough to relate these incidents to her diet and chose to abstain from consuming the offending foods for the duration of the breast-feeding period. We had spent some time discussing and theorizing about the underlying reasons.With the coffee we suspected the caffeine. With the cabbage we suspected the nitrogenous (high protein) fertilizers used in growing the vegetable and the sugar content. With the pasta we suspected the gluten and possibly the fructose content of the garlic and perhaps the garlic as an irritant. The curry and chili plainly had an irritant effect and we suspected the histamines in the chocolate. Michael, now in his late teens, eats all these foods sparingly but is pleased to avoid them where possible. He thrives on plain, simple meals with careful food combinations. Although not a celiac he is not fond of bread, biscuits and cakes etc and appears to instinctively avoid them. He likes his fruit and, particularly, his vegetables. He prefers to avoid spicy foods, deep fried foods, meat pies and the like where he struggles to digest the combination of meat and pastry: of protein and carbohydrate. He also prefers to avoid consuming orange juice in combination with toast and breakfast cereals: the combination of acid and carbohydrate. He deliberately avoids cucumber, garlic, onion, soft drinks, coffee and alcohol due to sugar fermentation and acidity issues. An intelligent, fun loving and well adjusted young man who towers over both his parents and enjoys robust good health, he has learned, with his mother’s support, to select and develop a diet which suits him and upon which he obviously thrives. He is living proof of the adage “that one man’s meat is another man’s poison”: that a single diet does not suit everyone. A lesson many people have yet to learn. Recently, via my blogs and Youtube videos I have made “friends” with three young men in their early twenties: one of Hispanic background from California and two from Melbourne. All are coeliacs (celiacs) with diabetes and thyroid complications overlapping with their gluten induced gut damage. All I suspect the result of long term poor food choices exacerbated by having to fend for themselves in early adulthood without the parental support, awareness and perception enjoyed by Michael. Interestingly, one of these young men from Melbourne has come to the conclusion that, unless he urgently does something to help himself, he will seriously compromise both his longevity and quality of life if he continues going down the path he has pursued to date. He has come back several times for reassurance, to seek further information and to express his determination to reach 80 years of age in good health. He is slowly, painfully and somewhat belatedly trying to go down the path pursued by Michael and his mother since Michael was a baby: that of finding the diet that suits his individual nutritional and health needs. He is making solid progress with the occasional setback like a recent bout of Ataxia (poor co-ordination, a classic symptom of gluten sensitivity, in addition to his severe gut damage) resulting from the eating of potato chips deep fried in gluten contaminated oil: an all too frequent occurrence. In some instances the child may outgrow the problem but in many others the problems or tendencies may be lifelong, for example, in the case of coeliac disease and many forms of gluten sensitivity and as in the case of Michael, recounted above, where many of the food sensitivities of early childhood remain into adulthood. In some other health problems, the degree of exposure to a particular food or food additive may be the issue. A small amount is OK but too much may lead to eczema, mucus, arthritis or headache problems etc. The consumption of such a food needs to be managed carefully. It is my belief that it is often better to eat a small amount of as many foods as possible – to build some tolerance to them - rather than to go down the road of the total exclusion of every offending food. Often, this approach is not only socially desirable but sometimes a necessity where there is limited opportunity to organize the food. In these circumstances, it is important for the dietary challenged individual to be selective and to know and understand their dietary limits and the consequences of exceeding those limits. I am a firm believer in the old adage of moderation and diversity in the diet and of gentle shifts in dietary regimes if making any changes. It is possible, for example, and often desirable to reduce the intake of sugar, salt, coffee, milk etc., in the diet and these changes are all best done gradually over a few weeks to enable the body, digestive system and the taste buds to acclimatise to the new regime. The same applies to the introduction of a new food. A gradual introduction of any new food is often more beneficial and pleasant than a sudden change in diet as this allows the body to adjust without adverse and off-putting reactions.
  9. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2000;12:541-547. (Celiac.com 07/09/2000) Researchers in Sweden released a report that shows a high number of patients with chronic diarrhea also have bile acid malabsorption. Further, steatorrhea is also common, but appears to be independent of bile acid malabsorption. Their study evaluated 94 patients with chronic diarrhea for loss of bile acids using both 75-SeHCAT and a fecal fat excretion tests. The patients also completed a symptom questionnaire before during a 7 day period before taking the 75-SeHCAT test. Dr. Kjell-Arne Ung and his colleagues from Sahlgrenska University Hospital, in Goteborg reported their finding in the the May issue of the European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. They found that mild steatorrhea was present in 50% of patients with non-organic bile acid malabsorption, and in 38% of patients with functional diarrhea. Further, low 75-SeHCAT levels alone is not an indicator or risk for steatorrhea, although some patients with severe organic disease had a concomitant malabsorption of fat and of bile acids. Dr. Ungs study also shows that severe steatorrhea was common in patients with celiac disease, even in patients with high 75-SeHCAT values. When compared with patients who had functional diarrhea, those with bile acid malabsorption had significantly more frequent and looser stools, however, abdominal pain, distension and flatulence was equal between those with bile acid malabsorption and normal bile acid absorption. In conclusion Dr. Ung and colleagues state: The high prevalence of bile acid malabsorption and the absence of specific symptoms, with the exception of frequent and liquid stools, indicates that the 75-SeHCAT test should be performed early in the investigation of patients with chronic diarrhea.
  10. Author: Auricchio S; De Ritis G; De Vincenzi M; Silano V. Source: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr, 1985 Dec, 4:6, 923-30. This paper is a critical appraisal of current theories on the mechanisms of toxicity of wheat and other cereals in celiac disease and some related enteropathies. The peptidase deficiency, primary immune defect, and gluten-lectin theories on celiac disease are examined and critically discussed on the basis of the relevant data available in 88 references. Special attention has been paid in this review to the nature of the cereal components triggering the appearance of toxic symptoms and signs in celiac disease as well as to underlying action mechanisms. The gluten-lectin theory is the one best able to explain celiac disease. It also explains some secondary intolerance that may occur in temporarily predisposed individuals as a consequence to viral hepatitis and intestinal infections, as well as the occurrence of intestinal lesions in healthy subjects that are administered very high amounts of gluten.
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