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Found 6 results

  1. Celiac.com 02/01/2018 - To make a clinical diagnosis of celiac disease, doctors use serological testing for IgA antibodies to human tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) which indicate celiac disease autoimmunity. However, some tests are more highly sensitive for anti-tTG, while other tests are highly specific. So, is combining two tests a reliable strategy for screening for celiac disease in clinical practice? A team of researchers recently compared the performance of three kits used to diagnose celiac disease, and evaluated the point prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity in a South Indian urban population. The research team included G Venugopal, J Mechenro, G Makharia, A Singh, S Pugazhendhi, R Balamurugan, and BS Ramakrishna. They are variously associated with the SRM Institutes for Medical Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Salai, Vadapalani in Chennai, India, the SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Kattankulathur, India, the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi, India, the Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City KS, USA, the Indian Institute of Technology, Samantapuri, Bhubaneswar, India, the SRM Institutes for Medical Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Salai, Vadapalani, Chennai, India, and with the SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Kattankulathur, India. For the first part of their study, the team performed anti-tTG testing on sera from 90 patients with documented celiac disease and 92 healthy controls using three different kits. They then tested one thousand nine hundred and seventeen healthy adults residents of the Vellore and Kancheepuram districts for celiac disease autoimmunity using a sequential two-test strategy. Based on these results, the team suggests that using first a highly sensitive test for anti-tTG followed by a highly specific test is a reliable strategy for screening for celiac disease in clinical practice. Source: Indian J Gastroenterol. 2017 Dec 22. doi: 10.1007/s12664-017-0803-z.
  2. Celiac.com 08/21/2017 - Can a tiny Virginia start-up change the world with a cheap, reliable devise to test food for gluten on the fly? With their startup called Altede, Ed and Anna Champion, together with business partner Briana Petruzzi, hope to build quick, cheap tests for all sorts of food allergens. Their first target is gluten. Altede is looking to develop a test that is reliable, sensitive to FDA levels of 20ppm gluten, costs less than $5 and could be performed within a couple of minutes while sitting at a restaurant table. The Altede team doesn't expect anyone to test everything they eat. But those with severe gluten intolerance might find peace of mind in a pinch. "We really want to keep the cost low. We think that's going to be critical," says Ed Champion. "You know, $15 and you're not going to do it. It's going to be too painful. But $3 or $5…what's your afternoon worth?" Altede has developed an antibody that they grow inside of and later extract from mice, a technique also used by pregnancy test manufacturers. The antibody is specially engineered to latch onto protein molecules inside gluten. A user like Anna Champion would carry the kit, which is about the size of a pack of M&M's. When she comes across a food she wants to eat but suspects may make her sick, she puts a pea-sized sample into a liquid container that comes inside the pouch. She would shake it up and then dip the test strip. The liquid would creep along the paper, passing a stripe of the antibodies Altede designed. If gluten is present, the antibodies will latch on to the proteins, accumulate on the paper and produce a visible pink line. So far, their prototype device can detect small amounts of gluten. The prototype looks and operates just like a pregnancy test. But the test currently takes hours, instead of minutes. Ed Champion says that tweaks to the chemistry will provide quicker results, though there are still a number of technical challenges to overcome. But after two years of development, Champion says the team is getting close. To help the, prepare their portable gluten tester for a product launch, Altede recently enrolled in the first cohort of RAMP, Roanoke's business accelerator, and received a $50,000 grant from the state's Commonwealth Research Commercialization Fund. Once the company can quickly and reliably test for gluten, it will use the same technology to build tests for a number of different food allergens. Champion has invested more than $30,000 in the venture to date. He supplies the business knowledge for the company, while Anna Champion, a Virginia Tech researcher, and Petruzzi, a Ph.D. student, are the scientific brains behind the operation. Stay tuned for updates on Altede and their efforts to build a better gluten test.
  3. Celiac.com 02/10/2012 - The HBV vaccine is usually effective against common hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, with just 4-10% of vaccine recipients failing to respond to standard immunization. Some studies suggest that people with celiac disease may have high levels of resistance to the HBV vaccine, compared to the general population. A team of researchers recently took a look at the issue of HBV vaccine reliability in people with celiac disease. The study team included Mohammad Rostami Nejad, Kamran Rostami, and Mohammad Reza Zali. They are variously affiliated with the Research Center for Gastroenterology and Liver Disease at Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran, and with Acute Medicine at Dudley Group of Hospital in Dudley, UK. Together, they reviewed data from previous studies. The ability to respond to recombinant HBV vaccine is associated with certain gene sites. At those sites, certain HLA haplotypes, such as B8, DR3, and DQ2 are common genetic markers among non-responders. Since HLA genotypes play an important role in unresponsiveness to the HBV vaccine, and since 90-95% of people with celiac disease have HLA-DQ2, celiac disease may be a factor in this failure to respond to the HBV vaccine. For one study, Ertekin et al., a research team gave HBV vaccinations, according to a standard immunization schedule, to 52 children with celiac disease, and another twenty matched for age and sex. The average age of the celiac disease patients was 10.7 ± 4 years (range, 4-18 years). Anti-HBs titers were positive in 32 (61.5%) patients and negative in 20 (38.5%) patients, while they were positive in 18 (90%) of the children in the control group (P < 0.05). The review team found statistically significant differences between negative anti-HBs titers, clinical presentation of celiac disease, and dietary compliance in patients with celiac disease (P < 0.05). In all, 32 of the 52 children with celiac disease responded favorably to HBV vaccination. This was a substantially lower percentage that the 18 of 20 control subjects responded (P < 0.05). Ertekin et al. concluded that a significantly higher percentage of children with celiac disease failed to respond to hepatitis B vaccination, as compared with the control group. They concluded that response to the HBV vaccine in children with celiac disease should be investigated, and a different immunization schedule should be developed for them. They suggested that celiac children who follow a gluten-free diet may have a better immune response to the HBV vaccine. The data fits with previous studies that confirm the findings that children with celiac disease fail to respond to the HBV vaccine at significantly higher rates than do healthy children. In fact, the researchers point out a similar study on adults, Noh et al., revealed that, of 23 adults with celiac disease who had completed a full course of HBV vaccination, 19 tested positive for HBsAb and 13 failed to acquire proper long-term immunity. Another study, by Stachowski et al., further cemented this connection between HLA and non-responsiveness to HBV vaccine. In that study, 34 out of 153 patients with end-stage renal disease failed to respond to HBV vaccine, and HLA-DQ2 was found almost exclusively in the non-responder group. Long stretches of time between vaccination and antibody testing might be one reason even celiac disease patients who follow a gluten-free diet have significantly reduced post-vaccination levels of HBV antibody. Therefore, current guidelines recommend revaccinating celiac patients once they have established a reliable gluten-free diet. This study was not designed to assess the presence of HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in the groups. Therefore, future studies assessing HLA haplotypes in celiac disease should seek to describe the role of HLA typing in response to HBV vaccination. The evidence indicates that early diagnosis of celiac disease, and treatment with a gluten-free diet may increase the overall percentage of patients responding favorably to the HBV vaccine. Treatment of celiac disease with a strict, gluten-free diet seems to play a positive role in the development of antibody memory. The review team points out that the high prevalence of celiac disease in the general population and a lack of response to HBV vaccine in untreated patients, invites routine assessment in patients with celiac disease receiving the HBV vaccine. Lastly, the review team notes that non-responsiveness to HBV vaccine may indicate undiagnosed celiac disease or noncompliance with gluten-free diet. SOURCE: Hepat Mon. 2011 August 1; 11(8): 597–598. doi: 10.5812/kowsar.1735143X.761
  4. Celiac.com 10/13/2009 - The standard method of measuring successful observance of a gluten-free diet in patients with celiac disease is through a dietary interview performed by health professional. However, there is currently have no simple, objective method for conducting such a dietary interview. To address this discrepancy, a team of researchers recently designed an easy, quick questionnaire based on four simple questions which yield a five-level score (0–IV). The score provides the test individual with an indication of their compliance level. The research team was made up of Federico Biagi, Alida Andrealli, Paola Ilaria Bianchi, Alessandra Marchese, Catherine Klersy, and Gino Roberto Corazza. The team recently set out to assess the accuracy of the questionnaire. They ran the questions past 168 celiac patients, 126 females and 42 males, with a median age of 42·4 (SD 12·9) years. All subjects were allegedly following a gluten-free diet (median 82, 25th–75th percentile 50–108, range 15–389 months). They compared the resulting scores with the persistence of both villous atrophy and endomysial antibodies while on a gluten-free diet. They also compared patient survival rates. Non-expert personnel interviewed patients by telephone. The questionnaire took less than one minute to complete. The lowest results were markedly more common among the patients with a persistence of both villous atrophy and positive endomysial antibodies. Those patients also had significantly higher rates of death overall. From these results, the researchers conclude that the questionnaire offers a simple, accurate way to verify compliance with a gluten-free diet for patients with celiac disease. Source: British Journal of Nutrition (2009), 102, 882–887
  5. The following labs have excellent reputations for such tests: Specialty Labs 2211 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica California 90404 Tel: 310 828-6543 or 800 421-4449 Internet: http://www.specialtylabs.com The University of Maryland at Baltimore Attention: Karoly Horvath, MD, or Athba Hammed, Research Assistant School of Medicine Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Laboratory UMAB/Bressler Research Building, Room 10-047 655 West Baltimore Street Baltimore, MD, 21201 410 706-1997 or fax at 410 328-1072 University of Iowa Foundation for Celiac Disease Research University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics 200 Hawkins Drive Iowa City, IA 52242 IMMCO Diagnostics, Inc. Vijay Kumar, Ph.D. IMMCO Diagnostics 60 Pineview Drive W. Amherst, NY 14228 Tel: (716) 691-0091 Toll Free Tel: (800) 537-TEST E-mail: IMMTEST@AOL.COM Immunopathology Laboratory Dept. of Pathology 5233 RCP University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics 200 Hawkins Drive Iowa City, IA 52242 Tel: (319) 356-2688 Mayo Clinic Dr. Joeseph Murray Internet: http://www.mayohealth.org/mayo/common/htm/index.htm Prometheus, Inc. 5739 Pacific Center Boulevard San Diego, California 92121 Tel: (619) 824-0895 Toll Free (888) 423-5227 Fax: (619) 824-0896
  6. Vijay Kumar, M.D., Research Associate Professor at the University of Buffalo and President and Director of IMMCO Diagnostics: Absolutely yes. For the test to provide meaningful results, it must be validated using a large number of clinical documented subjects. In addition, the two tests, endomysial and reticulin are immunofluorescent tests where the readings are subjective. Experienced laboratory personnel are needed to read such tests. Karoly Horvath, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Director, Peds GI Nutrition Laboratory; University of Maryland at Baltimore: There are several advantages to use a laboratory experienced with the celiac serological tests: Technically, the test are more reliable, and the internal and external control of tests are better established than in laboratories where the celiac disease serology panel is only one of the routine tests More importantly, laboratories specialized in celiac serological testing have larger numbers of positive and negative samples to validate their tests and they are able to set up more accurately the negative, intermediate and pathologic values A laboratory specialized in these tests generally has a clinical background, and the physicians with experience in celiac disease may help in the interpretation of the results and they are happy to consult with other physicians and they can answer the questions of patients.
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