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Found 19 results

  1. I am newly (and finally) diagnosed with NCGS. After being gluten free for a couple of months, I pushed my luck and ate some frozen vegetables that were "processed in a facility that processes wheat"... lo and behold I was sick for two weeks from eating those vegetables over the course of a couple days. (My symptoms are typically delayed by about 5 days, so it was too late to do anything by the time I became symptomatic). Since then I've obviously been avoiding anything with an allergen warning about being processed in facilities with wheat. The hardest part has been going out to eat though... Now I have to start thinking about how they cook the food at restaurants - Do they cook the food on the same surface as wheat? Do they use the same frier? Do they put bread on the plate? Etc, etc. So my question for you veterans is how you go about talking to your waiter/waitress at restaurants? What are the key questions to ask? Obviously, most people don't understand the severity of sensitivity regarding celiac/NCGS, so how do you communicate that to them well? What are some tips for going out to eat when you know there will likely not be safe options? Also, how do you tackle this socially when going out to eat with a lot of people? I suppose it will get easier over time to be the "odd one out," with all the food problems. Thanks for the help!
  2. Celiac.com 07/11/2017 - A UK man has filed a lawsuit against a local bar and grill after becoming sick on a gyro salad that servers led him to believe was gluten-free. The Webster Groves resident, Phillip "Gus" Wagner alleges that servers at Michael's Bar & Grill in Manchester, provided inaccurate information about the dish, and that he suffered an adverse reaction to the gluten in the dish that left him with "severe and permanent injuries." His lawyer, Christine Anderson of Faerber and Anderson, specifies that Mr. Wagner was injured in one or more of the following respects to wit: injuries to the cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal tract, internal organs, respiratory system and body as a whole; that he sustained an aggravation of a pre-existing condition; that said injuries are permanent and permanently disabling; that he has experienced pain and suffering in the past and is reasonably certain to experience pain and suffering in the future; that he has expended money for necessary medical care, treatment and services in the past and is reasonably certain to expend money for necessary medical care, treatment and services in the future resulting from said occurrence; that he has lost the ordinary gains of his employment and will lose further such sums in the future; that he has sustained loss of a normal life. For their part, the restaurant says that the lawsuit is their first indication of any kind of a problem. Michale's general manager, Katina Malliotakis, says they had no indication that any customer had any kind of problem, until someone called and demanded to know their insurance company, and adding that that someone had told Wagner the gyro salad was gluten-free. Malliotakis says that Michale's special gluten-free menu does not include the gyro salad, and that her servers are all aware of that fact. "Nobody remembers a customer asking about the gyro salad,” she says. If someone did ask for a gluten-free salad, any server would have pointed them toward another salad on the menu that is gluten-free."We have plenty of gluten-free options if people ask for that," she says. What do you think? Mistaken restaurant? Mistaken patron? Much ado about nothing? Source: riverfronttimes.com
  3. Hello All, I will be traveling to Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge, Tennessee in a few weeks and am looking for gluten free friendly places to eat. I can find the chain restaurants on my own but am hoping for recommendations for any smaller independent type places. Thanks!
  4. MinnesotaCeliac

    Maui Hawaii Experience

    Hello all, This past February I rented a condo on Maui (not for from Lahaina). I had a great experience and was able to find two 100% gluten free places to eat on the island (one a restaurant and the other a bakery). I usually mitigate all risk by not eating out, but felt comfortable enough with these two places to give them try. I also had no problem finding gluten-free foods at the supermarkets. The Maui Sugar shop Organic/gluten free Bakery was an awesome find and the owners are some awesome folks. It is in Lahainia and hard to find (I stumbled upon it because I took a wrong turn trying to find a parking spot). Most shops will actually be on Front street, but this little gem is tucked in a parking lot (if you find Panama Jacks on Front street...walk to the parking lot in back and it will be a few storefronts down in the same building as Panama Jacks back door. The treats are fantastic and so are the owners (I met each of them on separate visits and both are awesome folks). I only visited twice as I found them at the end of my vacation. I would have stopped there every day if I found them earlier. They are doing it right and earned my business (you just want folks like that to succeed). I also went to the Maui Brick Oven in Kihei. They are open for dinner. Don't let the strip mall location turn you away. Stop in and give them a try. You may find yourself grabbing a pizza to go too. There are plenty of gluten free groceries to be had in stores. There is a wholefoods in Kahului and the Safeway in Lahaina that had enough gluten free items to be fine (there was another grocery store closer to my condo that also had gluten-free food but not a as much(can't remember the name right now). Food can be expensive, but if you shop at safeway sign up for there rewards card (I think that is what they called it) and you'll get some good discounts. They also stock red-bridge if you want a gluten-free beer. If you have any questions let me know!
  5. oregonceliac

    How to order food safely

    Hey everyone, I'm a newly diagnosed celiac and have some social skills issues as well. While I've read other guides for how to order at restaurants, I was wondering if someone could write up specific questions to ask staff that I could use and memorize, as I'm not even sure what questions to be asking or how to phrase them the best (accurately, firmly, yet politely). Without some questions to ask, I tend to fumble my words and my needs don't get met or understood. I'd like to go out to a bar, for example, and I understand what ingredients are and aren't safe but am not sure what questions about cross contamination/shared kitchen use type stuff I should be asking. Would someone be willing to share the script they use for A.) going out to a new restaurant and B.) going to a bar? I would really appreciate the guidance. -G
  6. Hi all, I've been gluten-free for almost a year now, and am starting to feel better somewhat. I didn't bother dating while I was going through the healing process because I was just too sick. Now that my health has improved some I'd like to start dating again, but it always ends up with my trying to explain that I can't eat out and it gets awkward and the date doesn't happen or goes badly because I have yet to find someone who understands celiac. Anyone else deal with these issues? It would be cool to share experiences, advice, etc. on the subject!
  7. Celiac.com 09/13/2016 - A 10-year-old girl allegedly fell ill after eating pizza that was supposed to be gluten-free, but which turned out to be standard pizza. The girl, Sydney Bayle, became violently ill, and ended up in the local emergency room. The attorney for Grotto Pizza says the company has admitted making a "mistake." Now the parents, Samuel and Victoria Bayle, of Edinboro, Erie County, are seeking monetary damages against both Grotto Pizza and Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center in Plains Township, including doctors and nurses. After becoming ill and checking in at the Medical Center's Emergency Room, the parents claim that medical center staff made the Sydney wait for nearly three hours, where she continued to be ill enough to vomit blood. Sydney has suffered from celiac disease from birth, according to the complaint. Read more at: Timesleader.com
  8. Hi, my 9 yo daughter has celiac. At Mexican restaurants or burrito shops, I'd like to order her a quesadilla on corn tortillas. I am concerned about cross-contamination from the the quesadilla being cooked on the same grill as flour tortillas. What do other people do? Does it help to ask to clean the grill? Other food items apply too, like grilled fish.
  9. Hi there, first time posting on this site. Just a quick thing before I start, I had a gluten sensitivity/coeliac (haven't been tested, but I now it's bad for me at this point as I will explain) since early childhood, which screwed up my school life and damaged me mentally before I decided to simply skip on eating toast last September. Since then I have been on a gluten free diet and I haven't felt better (getting the other issues in my life sorted, so it's all good!) before in my entire life. Let's get to why I came here. Two weeks ago I ate a Rib Eye Steak at a restaurant, the first time going to a restaurant since I discovered I had a gluten sensitivity. Most of the food on the menu had gluten to some extent, cross contamination or just naturally contained it. After eating the steak, I felt pretty bad. But the symptoms went within an hour or so (it was just an unpleasant fatigue, similar to how I used to feel when eating gluten, so I knew what it was) and at that point I assumed my gluten sensitivity depended on how much gluten I eat on a daily basis. Oh...how wrong was I. The next evening, just as I went to bed, a terrible headache struck. Along with abdominal discomfort, acid reflux and flu-like symptoms, I felt like hell. This isn't something I have had at all since starting the gluten free diet, so I immediately knew what the symptoms were caused by. For the next week, the symptoms would come and go. Most of the time I wouldn't feel them all that much, then around early evening I may feel fatigue, worse brain fog and sometimes abdominal discomfort. This did sometimes happen earlier in the day. My stool quality is worse than usual, now constipated most of the time. This could be because I am experimenting with my diet though so it may be unrelated. Now two weeks later, most of the symptoms are gone. But I am still getting waves of fatigue in the early evenings. I read that sometimes the symptoms can take over two weeks to go, but I didn't think they could come and go in this manner? I would really appreciate an answer since I am fretting over this, can symptoms from gluten exposure occur in this manner? Especially if you are a few months into a gluten free diet? For further clarification, my diet hasn't changed much and the only things I ate recently that are a bit different than usual is raspberry jam and Quinoa. Only had the latter one and the Raspberry Jam after the glutening. May remove the jam for a few days to see what happens.
  10. Celiac.com 07/24/2014 - People that have celiac disease know one of the main concerns is avoiding gluten when they have meals. Their second biggest concern is the possible co-mingling of ingredients that can contaminate otherwise gluten-free food! So how do you eat at restaurants when you have celiac and still have peace of mind? Here is how: Before you are to go out to a restaurant call ahead and ask for the manager, find out if they do offer gluten-free meals that are carefully prepared for people with food allergy (If you are unable to call ahead go online and look the restaurant up to see if they offer a gluten-free menu or gluten-free meal selections, if need be email them). Also ask if the restaurant prepares gluten-free meals in a separate area, and if the restaurant uses different cooking utensils for gluten-free meal preparation. When you arrive at the restaurant that you have confirmed has gluten-free meals, let your server know you have a "Gluten Allergy" (ok, you can use different terms, and this isn't correct, but it conveys necessity instead of trend) and must eat gluten-free. Ask for a gluten-free menu, if they did not offer one to you. If you feel comfortable ask to speak with the manager or chef at your table, so they know that you have a medical need for a gluten-free diet. Let your favorite restaurants know that you want gluten-free meal selections and a gluten-free menu if they do not offer that yet. Do not be afraid to ask! Also, online there are cards you can print out and take to restaurants that you can give to server, manager or chefs to let them know that you are in need of a gluten-free diet. Some restaurants are now getting trained for gluten-free food preparation through National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) and Great Kitchens, so that all the staff is fully prepared and educated on how to handle safe preparation of meals for celiac and gluten intolerant individuals. Talk about peace of mind; if a restaurant has had the gluten-free food training, know you are safe to eat gluten-free meals there!
  11. Celiac.com 10/06/2014 - Anyone who has ever had difficulty ordering gluten-free food at a restaurant can likely appreciate the scene that recently played out at a San Francisco restaurant called SO. After back-to-back problems with “rude customers,” employees of the eatery staged a walkout. The next morning, the management posted a sign that not only made their feelings clear about the situation, but let no doubt about they position on MSG, organic food, and gluten-free food. The sign read: We are CLOSED Because of You (Customers) SO… *YES we use MSG! SO… *We don’t believe in organic food AND…don’t give a s$#& about gluten free The walkout allegedly occurred after one party refused to pay for food they said was ‘too spicy,’ and another cursed at the owner. Granted, the dustup likely has more to do with rude patrons than with difficult gluten-free diners, but the management is making it clear that this is one place you will not be getting gluten-free food. It’s too early to tell whether the SO will suffer any blowback from their actions, but stay tuned for further updates. Here is the Yelp! page for SO. In the meantime, what do you think? Are you offended at the owner’s attitude? Or maybe happy they have made their position so clear? Or confused to see gluten-free lumped in with MSG and organic food?
  12. Asafoetida (hing) is a spice that's often used often in Indian cuisine and it usually has gluten in it. Some restaurant managers don't even know that and unintentionally will serve you gluten so be sure to ask them whether they use it or not.
  13. Nachos are one of may favorite snacks to make at home. Nachos are versatile, easy to make, and sure to please most eaters. They can be easily adapted to include myriad ingredients. This recipe delivers restaurant-style chicken nachos that will have your guests asking for more. Ingredients: 4-6 ounces whole chicken breast, cooked and shredded 16 ounces tortilla chips 4 ounces Cheddar cheese, shredded 4 ounces Monterey Jack cheese, shredded 4 ounces black olives, pitted, sliced, strained 2 ounces crumbled Cotija cheese ½ large tomato, diced 1 cup salsa of choice 1 avocado, skinned, pitted and sliced 1 can refried beans (I use Goya, but any brand works) 2 cloves garlic, crushed 6 green onions, sliced, white parts and tops separated 3 tablespoons animal lard (use vegetable oil if you like) salt and pepper to taste Directions: Heat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). In a small sauce pan, warm the beans gently over low heat. In a 12 inch skillet over medium heat, cook and stir the garlic and white parts of the green onions in lard until tender. Mix in shredded chicken, salt and pepper. Toss until well coated with oil. Stir in the salsa. Arrange tortilla chips on a large baking sheet or baking dish. Spread beans over the chips and top with the chicken mixture. Top with Cheddar and Monterey Jack cheeses, tomato and olives. Bake for 10 minutes, or until cheese has melted. Remove from heat and sprinkle with sliced avocado, Cotija cheese, and chopped green onion tops before serving.
  14. I understand that there are quite a few restaurants that have gluten free menus. My question is, do most of these restaurants prepare the gluten free items to where they will not be cross contaminated? Applebees, Chilis, Red Robin: these are just a few of the places that I know have gluten free menus. Any ideas?
  15. Just got back from a beach vacation with the family and thought I'd share a few restaurant options for those traveling to the Gulf Shores/Orange Beach/Fort Morgan Alabama area. This is my second year eating gluten free at the beach and here's a few of the places I hit: Fort Morgan Tacky Jacks II - The waitress was very helpful here. She recommended their seafood salad, but they also had some steamed crab and boiled shrimp entrees that were safe, as well as a steak. I had the steamed crab claws with butter as an appetizer and the seafood salad as an entree. Both were really good. The salad had an ample supply of shrimp and crawfish on it. I didn't get sick on anything. Orange Beach Colbalt's - This is an upscale restaurant. The waitress was immediately brought me their gluten free menu, which had quite a few options (but, as usual, no prices ) There were the obligatory salad offerings, as well as several seafood dishes and steak that were all gluten free. I ordered a dinner salad and their North Carolina bbq ribs. The ribs were very delicious - slightly sweet and spicy. They have a full bar and a great patio. We sat on the patio and looked at all the yachts coming in to dock. I didn't get sick here either. Yay! Gulf Shores The Original Oyster House - Last year I had a bad experience at this restaurant. I had a really sweet waitress but not very knowledgable. My food came out with a huge piece of bread on it and I had to get the kitchen to remake the dish. I ended up eating the second dish, even though I really shouldn't have and, of course, I got sick. So this year I was really hesitant to eat there. Their salad bar is a buffet, so that isn't really even an option. The waiter this year was much more informed about gluten and seemed to have more faith in the kitchen. Still, I didn't want to take a risk so I only ate a baked potato and they didn't gluten me this year. The Hangout - The have a notice printed on their menu to inform them if you have allergies. The waitress knew several options and offered to get the manager to help with more. I ended up eating the Mandarin salad, just because it sounded good. They substituted grilled chicken for fried to make it gluten free. It tasted really good. There were several other seafood and salad options I could have chosen, as well as a bunless burger. I managed not to get sick here either. LuLu's - This is my favorite place to eat when I'm in the area because it's so easy. They have a separate allergen menu that lists gluten free, dairy free, and soy free (I think). There are a ton of options. They also serve gluten free beer - Omission Lager. I had never tried Omission before so it was fun to be able to order something different. I got the mahi mahi tacos, which were super yummy. The tortilla chips that come with them are baked, instead of fried, so they're not as tasty as the regular ones but will do in a pinch. When you order off the allergen menu, a manager has to come and take your order instead of the waiter or waitress. And the manager delivers the food. They have a good understanding of food allergies/intolerances. I didn't get sick here either. Hope this helps anyone who will be traveling to this part of Alabama.
  16. I was diagnosed with Celiac two weeks ago and have been following the diet without a problem. Last night I went out with a small group for a friend's birthday and ordered what I thought was a perfectly gluten-free meal, but after eating it was like I had the flu and was sicker than I had ever been before going gluten-free... Here's what I ate: Salad (romaine lettuce and dressing*) Steak (no seasoning, in a tomato sauce* with provolone cheese) Vegetables (steamed and served in butter with no seasoning) * = the chef said these were gluten-free items Before ordering I spoke with the waiter/manager about my condition and they seemed very knowledgeable about celiac and my needs. The restaurant was empty (I hear that's the best time for a celiac to eat out). My food was prepared separately and in a clean area with new utensils (I do not know this for sure, but that's what I was told).... Am I missing something?
  17. Hi all - My husband and I are taking a trip to Las Vegas in September. I am all set with the many food choices there. However I am nervous about the 2 days we will spend traveling to the Grand Canyon. We are staying overnight in Tusayan, Arizona and the hotel has a fridge. I know to pack a cooler and that there is a Safeway in Williams. But we also want to dine out. Can anyone recommend or know of a restaurant that is in Tusayan and vicinity that would work? Thanks so much !
  18. Having celiac disease has ruined the restaurant experience for me. i try to be clear about my condition to wait staff, and they are dismissive, resentful and always confused. Then i get to read down a long list of foods i can never eat again. I end up getting something plain like a salad. later i am asked if i got enough to eat. i lie. Sometimes i have to send my food back and this makes me feel like people think im high mantenence! im sorry if i sound bitter. but its an awful exp . need tips to make it easier thanks
  19. This article appeared in the Winter 2005 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free Newsletter, and is an edited excerpt from Wheat-Free, Worry-Free: The Art of Happy, Healthy, Gluten-Free Living. Celiac.com 01/11/2005 - Even the most seasoned wheat-free/gluten-free eater (forgive the pun—"seasoned eater") may feel a little uncomfortable venturing out of the home. Its true that your risk of getting unsafe foods does increase when you leave home, but most people agree that the life experiences of eating at restaurants while traveling, or even just the social aspects or convenience of eating at a restaurant on any given day or night, are well worth it. In reality, when you eat at restaurants, some chefs will "get it" and work to ensure a safe meal for you, and others wont. Going to restaurants isnt really about eating as much as it is the ambience, the company, and, well, okay—the convenience. Focus on those primary reasons for going to a restaurant, and make the food secondary, even if theres very little you can eat. If youve heard me speak or read my books, then youve followed my advice and stuffed yourself before you left the house, so youre not hungry anyway. Defensive Dining Its been said that the best offense is a good defense, which probably applies to restaurant excursions as well as it does to the football field. Im not encouraging you to be offensive; in fact, quite the opposite. Its not, after all, the waiters or chefs responsibility to accommodate your diet. If they do, be prepared to leave a big tip, because their job descriptions definitely do not include understanding the intricacies of this diet. Nor should you fill them in on all the minutiae surrounding the diet. A brief education is all they should need, because you should already have narrowed down the choices on the menu that look as though they might be safe, or at least may be prepared in a way that would make them safe. Its okay to ask that your food be prepared in a special manner—people do that all the time even when they are not on a special diet. Most important, you need to be aware of specific foods and ingredients to avoid when eating out. Some things are more likely to be okay than others, and you should make it easier on yourself by choosing items that are more likely to be wheat-free/gluten-free. Plan Ahead Your days of eating at Italian restaurants with ease are probably behind you (although many Italian dishes are made with polenta, which is gluten-free). Pizza joints: also not likely. Chinese: possibly. Dont set yourself up for disappointment by selecting restaurants that will fill you with frustration by the very nature of their menu selection. Instead, choose restaurants with a large selection, or choose a restaurant based on its ethnicity or culture because its likely to offer more wheat-free/gluten-free foods. Thai foods, for instance, are often gluten-free, since they use fish sauce instead of soy sauce for a lot of their marinades and seasonings (although some fish sauces can also contain wheat). Study your ethnic foods so you know the ingredients they contain and can make good choices when it comes to restaurant selections. Knowing what to order is just as important as knowing where to go. Consider, for instance, an American-style restaurant like Dennys or Sizzler. For breakfast, youre better off contemplating the eggs (beware: many restaurant eggs are from a mix that contains gluten), hash browns (be sure to check), and bacon (check again) than you are the Waffle-Mania, even if it is only $3.95. For lunch or dinner, you can almost always find a restaurant that will offer you a burger (no bun), fries, and a salad (no croutons). Be aware of things that are likely to be problematic. For instance, most sushi is okay, but some of the products, such as imitation crabmeat, usually contain wheat, while other sushi items can contain soy sauce, which usually also has wheat. Cajun cooking often uses beer to cook shrimp and other shellfish, and of course beer is off-limits on a gluten-free diet. Make it easier on yourself by choosing foods that are more likely to be safe for you. What you end up with may not be your first choice, and you may find yourself longing for the days when you could order from a menu with your eyes closed. Dont whine about what you cant have, and focus on the things you can. Remember, eating out isnt about the food. Its about the atmosphere, the company, and the fact that youre not cleaning up. Talk to the Waiter and Ask the Right Questions Sometimes talking to the waiter is an exercise in futility. If you realize this is the case, either order what you deem to be safest, order nothing at all, or leave. A cooperative waiter or waitress, on the other hand, is your first line of defense in keeping bad food away. Make friends. Be kind. Tip well. After youve picked what you think could be a safe menu selection or could be made into one, ask questions. Dont be shy; its not rude or uncommon for people to ask questions, even when theyre not accommodating a restrictive diet. Ask if the hamburger patty is 100 percent beef or if it has fillers; ask if the eggs are all-egg, or if they have fillers; check to make sure the fries arent coated with breading, seasonings, or anything else that would make them off-limits. Check sauces and marinades; even if you mention that you cant eat wheat or gluten, people rarely realize, for instance, that soy sauce usually contains wheat. Once youve made your menu selection, the waiter isnt dismissed. At this point it gets a little awkward because youve probably already asked a lot of questions, but there are a few more to ask, because how the food is prepared is also important. You need to make sure that the hamburgers arent grilled on the same rack as the buns, and that the croutons arent just plucked out of your salad, but rather that they were never put in. You even need to ask about the oil the fries are cooked in, because if theyre cooked with breaded foods, you really shouldnt eat them. At this point, even the most patient of waiters is likely to be giving you a stiff smile with that "Is there anything else youd like to know?" expression. Offer to talk to the chef, if it would make things easier. Chefs, although not often educated in the fine art of accommodating restricted diets, are usually interested in them nonetheless, and are usually quite fascinated when you talk to them about the wheat-free/gluten-free diet. Each time you talk to a chef, youre educating him or her and making it easier for the next wheat-free/gluten-free patron who comes along. Do Your Homework Many national chain restaurants have lists of their wheat-free/gluten-free products available by phone or on their Websites. Collect lists from your favorite restaurants and fast-food chains, and keep them in a folder for future reference. You may even want to consider putting them in a three-ring binder that you keep in the car. Once youve done all the work to find restaurants that work for you, by all means dont worry about getting in a rut. Theres nothing wrong with "tried and true" when your only other option is "guessed and now Im sick." Dont get too complacent, though, because just like products at the grocery store, menu items at restaurants sometimes change ingredients. Check frequently, and remember that even if you think its safe, if something makes you sick, dont eat it! BYOF (Bring Your Own Food) It probably wouldnt be too cool for a group of eight to walk into a lovely Italian restaurant, with everyone carrying their entire meal in a brown paper bag, simply to enjoy the ambience. But if you go to a restaurant and bring a small amount of food with you—even if its the main course—its certainly not rude. Some (but not many) restaurants have regulations about preparing food, and are allowed to serve only foods that theyve prepared. Most, however, have no problem if you bring in your own pizza and ask them to heat it for you. If you do bring your own food, make sure you its wrapped in aluminum foil to avoid contamination during the heating process. Pizza ovens, for instance, sometimes have convection fans that can blow the flour from other pizzas around the oven, contaminating yours. If you bring bread and ask them to toast it for you, theyre likely to put it in the slot of a toaster, contaminating it with "regular" crumbs and ruining your pristine bread. In that case, you might want to explain that it cant be put in a toaster, but if they have a toaster oven or broiler (that isnt blowing flour around), that would be wonderful. If youre asking them to microwave something, of course, theyll just remove the aluminum foil. The most important thing to remember if youre bringing your own food is to leave a big tip. Sprechen Sie Gluten? When eating at restaurants of different cultures and ethnicities, its a good idea to know the language, especially if the restaurant is staffed by people who speak a language other than your own. Learn the important words to best communicate your special needs. For instance, in Spanish the word for flour is harina, but that can refer to corn flour or wheat flour, so you need to know that the word for wheat is trigo, and corn is maize. Some restaurant cards come in a variety of languages. Additionally, some Websites offer translation capabilities. Tipping Im aware of the redundancy in my continuous references to tipping and the importance of being extra generous at tip-time, but I believe it bears repeating. When it comes to asking people to accommodate the gluten-free diet, it seems imperative that we express our gratitude to those who generously oblige our requests. As awareness of this diet increases over the next few years, it will be more common for restaurateurs to understand these restrictions and accommodate them. Anything we can do as a community to enhance their understanding and acceptance will benefit us all in the long run. Have fun! Now that youre armed with some basic restaurant realities, remember rule #1: Have fun! Dont live your life in a bubble just because you have a dietary restriction. Bon appetite!