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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/26/2019 - People with gluten intolerance often have non-gastrointestinal symptoms, including several common skin conditions. If you have celiac disease or other sensitivity to gluten, a gluten-free diet may help to improve symptoms of these associated skin conditions. These Seven Common Skin Conditions are Associated with Celiac Disease Acne Links between celiac and malabsorption, as well as hormonal upset can contribute to a greater production of acne. Many birth control pills boast promises of clearer skin, their method is through hormone manipulation. Because many who suffer from gluten intolerance also experience a disruption of normal hormone function, this disharmony can lead to problems with acne. There are some anecdotal reports that acne can improve on a gluten-free diet. Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis) Technically, the mouth is not part of the skin, but we include canker sores, since they are one of the most common non-gastrointestinal celiac symptoms, and easily visible in the mirror. Nearly 20% of people with symptomatic celiac disease had canker sores as one of their symptoms. In many cases, these canker sores are recurrent, and can be one of the few or only signs of celiac disease. Dermatitis Herpetiformis This painful, blistery condition can be very stressful, especially when misdiagnosed. An inflamed, itchy rash, dermatitis herpetiformis begins as tiny white filled blisters or red spots around hair follicles. Trying to hide or disguise DH, as well as trying to treat it when misdiagnosed can be incredibly stressful for a person. Read more on celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis at Celiac.com. Dry Skin Also correlated to malabsorption, dry skin is a very common complaint amongst those with celiac. But this condition is one that many people see even after the prescribed treatment of a gluten free diet. Why? Vitamin E rich grains are vital to maintaining skin harmony, but since many who are gluten intolerant begin avoiding grains completely—even those grains that are gluten-free, getting that important Vitamin E in their diets can become a challenge. Eczema Eating a gluten-free diet is becoming an increasingly popular mode of treatment for eczema. Those who are gluten intolerant also tend to have more advanced psoriasis.Psoriasis—Like eczema, psoriasis has in many cases shown improvement when the person is put on a gluten free diet. In Scott Adams’ 2004 article, he also mentioned that psoriasis in those with celiac tends to be more severe. Psoriasis Psoriasis is a common, chronic, genetic, systemic inflammatory disease that usually manifests as itchy plaques of raised red skin covered with thick silvery scales. Psoriasis is usually found on the elbows, knees, and scalp but can often affect the legs, trunk, and nails. There’s been very little research done on the association between celiac disease and psoriasis. That means there’s just not much good information. Some people with psoriasis claim to see benefits on a gluten-free diet, but that is purely anecdotal. One interesting finding recently was that psoriasis patients who do not have celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity commonly show high levels of antigliadin IgA antibody, and would likely benefit from a gluten-free diet. Some earlier studies have shown that celiac disease antibodies correlate with psoriasis activity, though little follow-up has been done, so there’s still a lot of confusion about any connection to celiac disease? Read more on celiac disease and psoriasis at Celiac.com. Rosacea Rosacea is a common inflammatory skin condition that shares the same genetic risk location as autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease. Some studies have shown high rates of immune conditions in rosacea patients, while others have shown a connection between rosacea, celiac and other diseases. Still, more research is needed to nail down the connection. The most recent study showed that rosacea is associated with T1DM, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis in women, whereas the association in men was statistically significant only for rheumatoid arthritis. Again, for people with celiac disease, or a sensitivity to gluten, symptoms of these skin conditions may improve or disappear on a gluten-free diet.
  2. Celiac.com 04/30/2018 - Rosacea is one of the most common skin diseases, and usually manifests as chronic inflammation of the eyes and the central part of the face. Rosacea is medically harmless, but it can trigger strong self-consciousness and reduce people’s overall enjoyment of life. For most people, symptoms of rosacea include flushing and erythrosis or reddening of the face. A small percentage of patients also get the formation of papules and pustules, with phymata. Doctors have posited numerous possible triggers, including hypochlorhydria, dysmotility, anatomic anomalies of the intestine, and immunologic causes. SIBO is an acronym for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, a medical condition marked by an abnormally high concentration of bacteria in the jejunal aspirate on culture. SIBO is more common in people with rosacea than it is in the general population, and when SIBO is treated with antibiotics, skin lesions vanish in nearly 100% of cases. This remission lasts for at least 9 months in about 80% of patients. The same thing happened when unresponsive SIBO patients receiving placebo as part of a study were switched to antibiotics, so the evidence is very strong. It’s well known that numerous patients with rosacea have stomach and gut complaints, including dyspepsia, bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain of a cramping nature, altered bowel habits such as alternating constipation and diarrhea, and meteorism. It’s also not uncommon for rosacea patients have to suffer from medical conditions such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, celiac disease, gastritis due to H. pylori overgrowth, lipase deficiencies, hypochlorhydria, and diseases affecting the small intestinal mucosa. Rosacea patients show a good response to a variety of antibiotics, including tetracycline or macrolide drugs, metronidazole, or chloramphenicol. The overwhelmingly positive response to antibiotics, coupled with the fact that many rosacea patients see symptom improvement when treated with drugs that speed intestinal movement, lends support to the idea that skin lesions have a bacterial origin. Still, evidence of bacterial role in rosacea has been far from clear. Some researchers suspect that rosacea lesions result from increased intestinal permeability in patients with SIBO, which in turn might lead to translocation or pro-inflammatory cytokine release. Earlier studies have linked rosacea with certain genetic variants in the genomes of rosacea sufferers that were strongly associated with the disorder, including genetic variants in or near the HLA-DRA and BTNL2 genes. Interestingly, these areas of the genome are also associated with autoimmune disease, including type I diabetes and celiac disease. Read more about rosacea and SIBO at News-medical.net, and at Rosacea.org.
  3. Celiac.com 02/24/2016 - Rosacea is a common inflammatory skin condition that shares the same genetic risk location as autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease. Researchers have noted a clustering of autoimmune diseases in patients with rosacea. In fact, a recent genomewide association study found 90 genetic areas associated with T1DM, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and/or rheumatoid arthritis, but did not address a possible association with rosacea. A team of researchers recently set out to assess any connections between rosacea and T1DM, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis, respectively. The research team included Alexander Egeberg, MD, Peter Riis Hansen, MD, PhD, DMSci, Gunnar Hilmar Gislason, MD, PhD, Jacob Pontoppidan Thyssen, MD, PhD, DMSci, National Allergy Research Center, Department of Dermato-Allergology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark, Department of Cardiology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark. For their study, the team conducted a population-based case-control study in which a total of 6,759 patients with rosacea were matched with 33,795 control subjects on age, sex, and calendar time. They used conditional logistic regression to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). After adjustment for smoking and socioeconomic status, patients with rosacea had significantly increased ORs for T1DM (OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.41-4.73), celiac disease (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.35-3.07), multiple sclerosis (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.20-2.28), and rheumatoid arthritis (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.82-2.52). The connection was seen most commonly in women, while for men, only the rheumatoid arthritis connection was statistically significant. As a disclaimer, the researchers point out that they were unable to distinguish between the various sub-types and severities of rosacea. However, they did find that rosacea in general is associated with T1DM, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis in women, whereas the association in men was statistically significant only for rheumatoid arthritis. Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
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