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Found 14 results

  1. Celiac.com 11/15/2018 - Gluten-free products, marketed as such, were largely unknown 20 years ago, but the gluten-free industry is set to reach an estimated $2.34 billion in sales by 2019. That’s more than double figures for 2014. The growth has been exponential. What sets gluten-free foods apart from other culinary trends or diet fads is that they address a legitimate health concern that affects millions of people around the world. With the massive influx of gluten-free products, and the expansion of “gluten-free” restaurant options, it’s easy to forget that gluten exists in some obvious and not so obvious places that people with celiac disease need to avoid. Here are 15 foods or food ingredients that many people wrongly assume are gluten-free: Beer Light or dark, lager, IPA or Stout, traditional beer is brewed with barley, and is not gluten-free. However, a number of major and micro breweries create tasty gluten-free alternatives. There are a number of tasty, award winning beers that are brewed from gluten-free ingredients and are fully gluten-free. There are also gluten-reduced beers. These beers are brewed like traditional beers and EU regulations allow for gluten-removed beer to be labeled as gluten-free. Plenty of people with celiac disease do fine drinking these beers, but many do not. Know your beer, know your body, and drink accordingly. Read more at Celiac.com's Oktoberfest Beer Guide! Gluten-free vs. Gluten-removed Beers. Barbecue Sauce Many barbecue sauces use artificial colors, flavorings or thickeners that may contain gluten, so it’s important to check labels, and even contact a manufacturer if you're not sure about something. Couscous, Tabbouleh and Falafel Couscous and bulgar are wheat and are used in many different Middle-eastern foods, and some people do not realize that they contain gluten. Bulgar or couscous are also used to make another popular Middle-eastern dish called tabbouleh (salad). Couscous or wheat flour are sometimes used to make falafel, so be sure to ask about the ingredients before eating. Candy Always be careful about candy. Many candies are safe and gluten-free, but many candies are not. Sometimes trusted products can change. Read labels, check websites, contact manufacturers as needed, and be careful! If you’re not sure, Celiac.com’s Annual Safe Gluten-Free Halloween Candy List is a good place to start. Cookie Dough This might seem obvious, but cookie dough, unless specifically gluten-free, almost always contains standard wheat flour and is not gluten-free. Dried Spices Some manufacturers actually use flour to keep their spices from clumping. Pay special attention to spice blends and mixes, including curry powders, which may contain wheat. Gravies, Soups, Sauces and Mixes—Packaged, Canned, or Jarred If you’ve ever made gravy from scratch, you might recall that it involves making a roux, a paste of butter and flour which thickens the gravy and gives it a nice sheen. Well, roux is also used as a thickening agent in many packaged, canned or jarred gravies, soups, sauces and mixes. Even some fresh soups may contain wheat or flour. Gazpacho, for example, can be made gluten-free, but most recipes call for a piece of bread soaked in sherry vinegar and blended into the soup. When it comes to gluten in soup, eater beware! Hot Dogs & Sausages The bun is an obvious source of gluten, but the dog itself can contain traces of wheat as well in the form of both filler and binder. So check labels, know the ingredients, and double-check when it comes to hot dogs and sausages. Ice Cream Although many ice creams are gluten-free, some may contain wheat in the form of added ingredients, like cookie dough, toppings or candy pieces. Double-check the ingredients to be safe. Packaged Deli Meats, Marinated or Pre-Seasoned Meats & Vegetable Proteins Packaged, marinated meat, fish, chicken, or other meats may contain gluten as a binder or hidden ingredient. Some vegetable-based proteins like Seitan contain gluten. Also, many deli meats claim to be gluten-free, but the same companies have released specific lines of gluten-free meats, raising the question of why they needed a separate product in the first place. Deli meats are controlled by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, not the Food and Drug Administration, which currently uses a different gluten-free standard. Prescription Drugs, Vitamins and Supplements Even though they are not technically foods, and they are meant to keep you healthy, prescription drugs, vitamins and supplements may contain gluten as binders, typically in the form of wheat starch. Ask you pharmacist for guidance, read labels closely, and make phone calls to companies or visit their Web sites to be sure. Salad Dressings Many salad dressings have updated their recipes to exclude any wheat or barley-derived additives, but some still contain gluten, especially the powdered mix kind. Soy Sauce Most soy sauces contain wheat and should be avoided. Be sure to find a gluten-free soy sauce. Sushi Although raw fish by itself is gluten-free, there are many ingredients in sushi rolls and other items that contain soy sauce and other sources of gluten. The seaweed wrappers in sushi may contain soy sauce, and the wasabi or fake crab may contain gluten. Teriyaki sauce is another source of gluten because it is made with soy sauce. See our How to Safely Order Sushi article for more info. Teriyaki Sauce Teriyaki is nearly always made with made with soy sauce, and most commercial brands contain wheat, so be careful. Read more on: Celiac.com UNSAFE Food List Celiac.com SAFE Food List Celiac.com's SAFE and UNSAFE Halloween Candy List
  2. Celiac.com 10/11/2018 - Halloween is upon us once again, and that means it’s time for Celiac.com’s Safe Gluten-Free Halloween Candy list for 2018. This year, we’ve added candies to both the SAFE Gluten-Free Halloween Candy list, and to our UNSAFE Non-Gluten-Free Halloween Candy list. We’ve also added more manufacturer contact information to make getting answers to gluten-free questions easier. Taken together, we think it’s the best, most comprehensive and most up-to-date list of safe, gluten-free Halloween candies, and other candies to watch out for. Below our SAFE, GLUTEN-FREE Halloween candy list, you will find a list of UNSAFE, NON–GLUTEN–FREE candies, along with a partial list of major candy makers, links to their company websites, and other resources. As always, Celiac.com strives to make the Safe Gluten-Free Halloween Candy List as comprehensive as possible, please keep in mind that the list is by no means complete, or definitive, and should only be used as a guideline. Before eating any candy on the list, always read labels, check manufacturer information, and choose according to your own sensitivity levels, or those of your children. Feel free to comment below if you see any issues, or if you'd like us to take note of any information you may have about a product. Lastly, manufacturer information can change. That means that a product this is safely gluten-free at one point may suddenly be made with gluten ingredients. The opposite is also true, as many manufacturers are doing what they can to make products gluten-free when possible. That means it’s important to read labels, and check manufacturer websites for information on changes to any specific products. As always, Celiac.com wishes you and your loved ones a safe and happy gluten-free Halloween 2018! Gluten-Free Halloween Candy 2018: 3 Musketeers fun size 3 Musketeers Mint with dark chocolate A Act II Popcorn Balls Adams & Brooks Fun Pops Scooby Doo Ingredients free of: peanuts, tree nuts, egg, milk, wheat/gluten, soy Albert's Gummy Eyeballs Albert's Iced Halloween pops (lollipops) Alien Pop, Baseball Pop, Basketball Pop, Boo Pop, Carousel Pop, ColorBlaster Pop, Football Pop, Happy Heart Pop, Hoppin' Pop, Lickin' Lips Pop, Lolliday Pop, Lollinotes, Pop—A—Bear, Soccer Pop, Alien Glow Pop, Buggin' Glow Pop, Burstin Bits, and Ghostly Glow Pop Almond Joy — All Except ALMOND JOY PIECES Candy Almond Joy fun size bars Altoids (except for Altoids Smalls Peppermint) Amanda's Own Confections Chocolate shapes and chocolate lollipops Annie's Organic Bunny Fruit snacks Andes mints and candies Alter Eco Dark Twist Chocolate Bar Alter Eco Dark Truffle with Mint Filling Alter Eco Organic Salted Caramel Chocolate Truffle Alter Eco Organic Sea Salt Chocolate Truffle Alter Eco Salted Burnt Caramel Chocolate Bar Amella Agave Caramels Amella Carmel Bar with Roasted Almonds Amella Chocolate Fudge Caramels Amella Gingerbread Caramels Amella Gray Sea Salt, Milk Caramel Amella Gray Sea Salt, Dark Caramel Amella Naked Honey Gray Sea Salt Caramels Amella Naked Honey Salted Chocolate Caramels Amella Naked Honey Lavender Caramels Amella Naked Honey Vanilla Caramels Amella Naked Candy Cane Amella Peppermint Caramels Amella Roasted Almond Caramels Amella Siracha Original Spicy Caramels Amella Vegan Sea Salt Caramels Amella  Walnut Fudge Caramels Angell Crisp Candy Bar Dark Angell Candy Bar Snow Angell Candy Bar Applehead, Grapehead, Cherryhead B Baby Ruth original and fun size Barrels of Candy Bazooka Big Mix (includes bubble gum, bubble gum filled candy, candy chews, and bubble gum filled lollipops) Bazooka Ring Pops Bazooka Push Pops Bazooka Baby Bottle Pops Betty Crocker Fruit by the Foot Wicked Webs Berry Wave mini feet Betty Crocker Halloween fruit flavored snacks, including Fruit Gushers, Fruit Roll–ups, and Mini Rolls Bit•O•Honey Big Blow bubblegum Black Forest Gummy Tarantulas Black Forest Gummy Fun Bugs Juicy Oozers Black Forest Organic Berry Medley Organic Fruit Snacks Black Forest Organic Caramel Hard Candy Black Forest Organic Fruit Chews Black Forest Organic Gummy Bears Black Forest Organic Gummy Cherries Black Forest Organic Gummy Cola Black Forest Organic Gummy Exotic Fruits Black Forest Organic Gummy Soda Black Forest Organic Gummy Tea Black Forest Organic Gummy Worms Black Forest Organic Halloween Mix Black Forest Organic Lollipops Black Forest Organic Mixed Fruit Hard Candy Black Forest Organic Sour Heads Little Monsters Black Forest Organic Sour Watermelon Black Forest Organic Sour Heads Brookside Dark Chocolate Acai and Blueberry Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Blood Orange and Peach Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Chardonnay Grape and Peach Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Covered Almonds Brookside Dark Chocolate Covered Blueberries Brookside Dark Chocolate Covered Cranberries Brookside Dark Chocolate Fruit & Nut Bar Blueberry with Açai Flavor and Other Natural Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Fruit & Nut Bar Cherry with Pomegranate Flavor and Other Natural Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Fruit & Nut Bar Cranberry with Blackberry Flavor and Other Natural Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Goji and Raspberry Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Mango and Mangosteen Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Merlot Grape and Black Current Flavors Brookside Dark Chocolate Pomegranate Flavor Brookside Milk Chocolate Covered Almonds Bubbly lollipop and gum Buckleberry Foods Chocolate Almond Butter Cups Buckleberry Foods Chocolate Mint Truffles Butterfinger bar, original and fun size C Cadbury Adams Swedish Fish Cadbury Adams Sour Patch Kids and Sour Patch Extreme Candy Checkers (made for Target) Caramel Apple Pops (made by Tootsie Roll) Carmit Caramel clusters Carmit Gold Coins Carmit Raisin Clusters Cary's Of Oregon Coconut Toffee Bites Cary's Of Oregon Dark Chocolate Almond Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Dark Chocolate Coconut Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Dark Chocolate Espresso Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Dark Chocolate Hazelnut Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Milk Chocolate Coconut Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Milk Chocolate Vanilla Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Milk Chocolate Almond Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Milk Chocolate Chai Toffee Cary's Of Oregon Toffee Bites Cella's Milk Chocolate Covered Cherries Cella's Dark Chocolate Covered Cherries Charleston Chew original and fun size Charms Blow Pops and Blow Pop Minis—may contain milk or soy Charms Pops Charms Squares Charms Sour Balls Charms Super Blow Pops Charms Candy Carnival Package—Blow Pops, Sugar Babies, Zip a Dee mini pops, Sugar Daddy, Pops, Sugar Mama Caramel, Tear Jerkers sour bubble gum, Blow Pop Bubble Gum—may contain milk or soy Charms Fluffy Stuff Spider Web cotton candy Cherryhead Chewy Atomic Fireballs Chewy Lemonheads and Friends Child's Play Chocxo 37% Milk Chocolate Coconut and Almond Snaps Chocxo 37% Milk Chocolate Hazelnut Butter Cups Chocxo 37% Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Chocxo 37% Milk Chocolate Salted Peanut Snaps Chocxo 70% Dark Chocolate Hazelnut Butter Cups Chocxo 70% Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Chocxo Double Dark Hazelnut Quinoa Cup Chupa Chups Fruit Lollipops Circus Peanuts by Spangler Cliff—Fruit Rope, all flavors "gluten-free" Coastal Bay Confections Candy Corn, Mellocreme Pumpkins, Autumn Mix Colombina Scary Eyeballs bubblegum Colombina Fizzy Pops Comix Mix Candy Sticks—Tom and Jerry, Flintstones, Scooby Doo, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Popeye Cracker Jack caramel coated popcorn and peanuts Crispy Cat Mint Coconut Candy Bar Crispy Cat Toasted Almond Candy Bar Crispy Cat Chocolate Marshmallow Candy Bar Crows CVS Brand Candy Bracelet with Pendant D Dagoba Products—All Daggoba Chocolate products are gluten-free Disney Halloween Candy Mix—jelly beans, gummies, candy bracelets and characters from Cars, Tinkerbell and Toy Story Dots Gumdrops—including Candy Corn Dots, Ghost Dots, and Bat Dots Dove pieces—Dark Chocolate, Milk Chocolate, Peanut Butter Milk Chocolate, Caramel Milk Chocolate Dream Almond Dark Chocolate Bar Dream Creamysweet Chocolate Bar Dream Pure Dark Dark Chocolate Bar Dream Raspberry Dark Chocolate Bar Dream Rice Crunch Chocolate Bar Dubble Bubble bubblegum Dum Dum Chewy Pops Dum Dum Lollipops (including Shrek Pops) E Enstrom Cappucino-Tiremisu Truffle Enstrom Cinnamon Truffle Enstrom Dark Chocolate Almond Belle Enstrom Dark Chocolate Almond Toffee Enstrom Dark Chocolate Almond Toffee Petites Enstrom Dark Chocolate Butter Toffee Enstrom Dark Chocolate Denver Mint Enstrom Dark Chocolate Espresso Belle Enstrom Dark Chocolate Espresso Toffee Enstrom Dark Chocolate Peanut Toffee Enstrom Dark Chocolate Peppermint Belle Enstrom Dark Chocolate Toffee Crumbs Enstrom Limoncello Truffle Enstrom Milk Chocolate Almond Toffee Enstrom Milk Chocolate Almond Toffee Petites Enstrom Milk Chocolate Butter Toffee Enstrom Milk Chocolate Denver Mint Enstrom Milk Chocolate Espresso Toffee Enstrom Milk Chocolate Mint Melt away Enstrom Milk Chocolate Peanut Toffee Enstrom Milk Chocolate Toffee Belle Enstrom Milk Chocolate Toffee Crumbs Enstrom Mint Melt away Truffle Enstrom Mixed Almond Toffee Petites Enstrom Peppermint Cookie Belle Enstrom Peppermint Truffle Enstrom Pumpkin Pie Spice Truffle Enstrom Sugar Free Milk Chocolate Almond Toffee F Farley's Kiddie Mix — Smarties, SweetTarts, Now and Later, Jaw Breakers, Super Bubble and Lolli—pops Ferrara Pan Caramels Ferrara Pan Lemonhead & Friends candy mix—including Applehead, Cherryhead, Grapehead, Chewy Lemonhead & Friends, Chewy Atomic Fireball, and Red Hots FLIX Spooky Lip Pops Lollipops, Angry Birds Lollipops, Gummy Boo Bands, Monsters, Inc. Character Candies, Lollipops and Marshmallow Eyeballs Florida's Natural Healthy Treats Nuggets, Sour String, Fruit Stiks Fright Fingers Popcorn Kit Frankford's Bugs Gummy Candy Frankford's Gummy Body Parts Frankford's Marshmallow Pals Frooties Fun Dip Fun Dip Sour G Game Night boxes of candy game pieces (includes Operation, Sorry!, Monopoly, Life, and Clue) Gimbal's Fine Candies Jelly Beans, Sour Lovers, Cherry Lovers, Cinnamon Lovers, Licorice Scotties Goldenberg's peanut chews Go Max Go Buccaneer Candy Bar Go Max Go Cleo's Candy Bar Go Max Go Mahalo Candy Bar Go Max Go Snap! Candy Bar Go Max Go Thumbs Up Candy Bar Go Max Go Twilight Candy Bar Goobers Go Picnic Sea Salt Caramel Lollipops Go Picnic Orbites Dark Chocolate and Tangerine Grave Gummies (Yummy Gummies) Greenbriar Skull and Bones Fruit Hard Candy, Spooky Lollipop Rings, Grave Gummies Gummy Brush Paint Shop Gummy Pirate Choppers H Harrison's Original Fruit Slices Harrison's Original Fruit Smiles Heath milk chocolate English toffee bar and snack size — contains almonds Hershey's Air Delight Hershey’s - Baking Bars Hershey’s Semi Sweet Baking Bar Hershey’s Unsweetened Baking Bar Hershey’s and Reese's - Baking Chips Hershey’s Butterscotch Chips Hershey’s Cinnamon Baking Chips Mini Kisses Milk Chocolates Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Chips Hershey’s Semi-Sweet Chocolate Mini Chips Hershey’s Mint Chocolate Chips Hershey’s Premier White Chips Hershey’s Semi-Sweet Chocolate Baking Chips Hershey’s Special Dark Mildly Sweet Dark Chocolate Chips Hershey’s Sugar Free Semi-Sweet Baking Chips Reese’s Peanut Butter Baking Chips Hershey’s - Cocoa Hershey’s Cocoa Hershey’s Special Dark Cocoa Hershey’s Kisses Hershey’s Hugs Candy Hershey’s Kisses Milk Chocolate Filled with Caramel Hershey’s Kisses Milk Chocolate Filled with Cherry Cordial Crème Hershey’s Kisses Filled with Vanilla Crème Hershey’s Kisses Dark Chocolate Filled with Mint Truffle Hershey’s Kisses Pumpkin Spice Flavored Candies Hershey’s Kisses Carrot Cake Flavores Candies Hershey’s Kisses Meltaway Milk Chocolates Hershey’s Kisses Milk Chocolate Hershey’s Kisses Special Dark Mildly Sweet Chocolate Hershey’s Kisses Deluxe Chocolates Hershey’s Nuggets Hershey’s Nuggets Milk Chocolates Hershey’s Nuggets Milk Chocolate with Almonds Hershey’s Nuggets Special Dark Chocolate with Almonds Hershey’s Nuggets Extra Creamy Milk Chocolate with Toffee and Almonds Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Bar (1.55oz only) Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Bar with Almonds (1.45oz only) Hershey’s Milk Duds – All Hershey’s Spreads – All Except Hershey’s Chocolate Spread with Snacksters Graham Dippers Hershey’s and Reese's Toppings Hot Tamales Hot Tamales Spray Hubba Bubba Gum Humphrey Popcorn Balls I Ice Cream Dipper (Blue Raspberry, Strawberry) J Jelly Belly beans—gluten–free, dairy–free Jolly Rancher hard candy and Doubles Candy Jolly Rancher Hard Candy Stix, Lollipops and Fruit Chews Jujy’s Junior Caramels Junior Mints Just Born Jelly Beans Just Born marshmallow treats Justin's Nut Butters dark chocolate peanut butter cups Justin's Nut Butters milk chocolate peanut butter cups Justin's Nut Butters white chocolate peanut butter cups Justin's Nut Butters mini dark chocolate peanut butter cups Justin's Nut Butters mini milk chocolate peanut butter cups K KatySweet Chocolate Dipped Strawberries KatySweet Pecan Fudge KatySweet Plain Fudge KatySweet Raspberry Lemon Almond Bark KatySweet Walnut Fudge Kellogg's Spongebob Squarepants fruit flavored snacks Kenny's Green Apple Rings Kenny's Gummi Bears Kenny's Peach Rings Kenny's Sour Gummi Bears Kenny's Sour Gummi Worms Kenny's Sour Neon Gummi Worms Kenny's Watermelon Rings Kinder Surprise Eggs Kraft Caramels Kraft Jet–Puffed Boo Mallows and Ghost Mallows Kraft Swedish Fish Kraft Sour Patch Kids and Sour Patch Extreme L Laffy Taffy Plain, Stretchy & Tangy and Rope Lemonheads Lemonheads & Friends Conversation Hearts Tropical Chewy Lemonhead Chewy Lemonhead & Friends Berry Chewy Lemonhead Lifesavers LifeSavers Gummies including Big Ring Gummies, Sweet 'n' Sour, and Scary Assortment Lily's Sweets 40% Original Creamy Milk Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 40% Salted Almond Creamy Milk Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 55% Almond Dark Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 55% Coconut Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 55% Crispy Rice Dark Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 55% Dark Chocolate Bar with Cinnamon Lily's Sweets 55% Original Dark Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Original Dark Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Blood Orange Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Candy Cane Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Chipotle Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets 70% Sea Salt Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets Creamy Milk and Hazelnut Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets Milk and Gingerbread Chocolate Bar Lily's Sweets Original Double Chocolate Crunch Bar Lily's Sweets Sour Cherry Double Chocolate Crunch Bar Lollipop Paint Shop Lovely Bananas Foster Lovely Black Licorice Lovely Caramel Apple Lovely Cashmels Lovely Chocolate Peppermint Lovely Chocolate Cherry Lovely Chewy Original Caramels Lovely Chocolate Swirl Caramels Lovely Fudgee Roll Lovely Fudgee Roll Raspberry Lovely Fruit Chews Lovely Halloween Cherry Licorice Lovely Halloween Juicy Chew Lovely Hula Chew Lovely Juicy Chew Original Lovely Juicy Chew Tropical Lovely Pumpkin Spice Lovely Salted Caramel Lovely Super fruit Chews M M&M's—original, peanut, peanut butter Manischewitz Fruit Slices Mars M&M's—except pretzel M&M's Mars Dove chocolate products (all flavors EXCEPT for milk chocolate cinnamon graham/cookies and cream, and some holiday varieties, such as milk chocolate truffles) Mars Munch Nut bar Mars Snickers, Snickers Dark bars, fun size and mini's—may contain almonds Mary Janes Mallo Cup Marvel Heroes Candy Sticks (Hulk, Spiderman, Wolverine) Mega Warheads Melster Chocolate Covered Marshmallow Melster Peanut Butter Kisses Melster Compound-Coated Marshmallow Melster Chocolate-Covered Creme Drops Melster Compound Coated Creme Drops Melster Salt Water Taffy Melster Peanut Butter Kisses Melster Circus Peanuts Melster Sanded Marshmallow Melster Coconut Toasties Milk Duds Milky Way Midnight Bar (not the original Milky Way Bar) Milky Way Caramel Bar Mike and Ike Mike and Ike Spray Mini Mentos Mini Sour Dudes Straws Monstaz Pops (jack–o–lantern lollipops) Monster Hunt plastic monster eggs filled with candy bones, skulls and pumpkins (made for Target) Mounds Bars – All Mounds dark chocolate fun size bars N Necco's Sky Bar 4 in 1 chocolate bar Necco Wafers Necco Mary Janes Necco Mary Jane Peanut Butter Kisses—does contain peanuts Necco Sweethearts Conversation Hearts (available for Valentine's Day only) Necco Canada Mint & Wintergreen Lozenges Necco Haviland Thin Mints and Candy Stix Necco Clark Bars Necco Skybars Necco Haviland Peppermint & Wintergreen Patties Necco Candy Eggs Necco Talking Pumpkins (available at Halloween only) Necco Squirrel Nut Caramels and Squirrel Nut Zippers Necco Banana Split and Mint Julep Chews Necco Ultramints Nestle Milk Chocolate fun size bars Nestle Baby Ruth Nestle Bit–O–Honey Nestle Butterfinger (NOT Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx) Nestle Goobers—does contain peanuts Nestle Nips (both regular and sugar–free) Nestle Oh Henry! Nestle Raisinets—made on equipment that processes peanuts Nestle Sno–Caps Nestle Toll House morsels and chunks (only if labeled gluten-free) Nestle Wonka Pixy Stix Nestle Wonka Laffy Taffy Nestle Wonka Lik–M–Aid Fun Dip Nestle Wonka Spree Nik—L—Nip wax bottles with juice Now and Later O Oh Henry! Operation Gummy Candy P Palmer Peanut Butter Cups—does contain peanuts Payday Candy – All Peanut M&M's Pearson's Bun candy—maple and roasted peanuts Pearson's Mint Patties, Pearson's Nut Goodies Pearson's Salted Nut Rolls Peeps Jack–O–Lanterns, Marshmallow Pumpkins, Marshmallow Ghosts, Marshmallow Tombstones, Chocolate Mousse Cats, Milk Chocolate Covered Pumpkins, Dark Chocolate Covered Pumpkins, and Milk Chocolate Dipped Orange Chicks—"Gluten Free" Pez candy—All PEZ products are "Gluten Free" Pop Rocks Popcorn Expressions Kettle Corn Snack Bags Pixie Stix Pure Fun Halloween Pure Pops R Rain Blo Bubble Gum Eyes of Terror Raisinets Razzles candy gum Red Bird Assorted Puffs Red Bird Dark Chocolate Peppermint Mini Red Bird Cinnamon Puffs Red Bird Cinnamon Sticks Red Bird Citrus Puffs Red Bird Cream Penny Sticks Red Bird Lemon minis Red Bird Lemon Sticks Red Bird Peppermint Puffs Red Bird Peppermint Sticks Red Hots Reese's Fast Break candy bars and snack size Reese’s Nutrageous Bar Reese's Peanut Butter Cups snack size and miniatures—Except Reese's Peanut Butter Cup Unwrapped Minis and Seasonal Shaped Items Reese's Pieces Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups – All Except Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup Unwrapped Minis and Seasonal Shaped Items Reese’s Pieces Candy - All Except Reese’s Pieces Eggs Reese’s Spreads – All Except Reese’s Spreads with Snacksters Graham Dippers Reese's Select Peanut Butter Cremes Reese's Select Clusters Reese's Whipps Riviera Spooky Candy Rings Rolo Caramels in Milk Chocolate Candies – All Except Rolo Minis Rolo chocolate covered caramels—Except ROLO Minis Russell Stover Salt Water Taffy Russell Stover Candy Corn Taffy Russell Stover Caramel Apple Taffy S Scharffen Berger Products – All Except Scharffen Berger Cocoa Powder Sidewalk Chalk Sixlets Skeleton Pops (lollipops) Skittles includes Original, Sour, Wild Berry, Fizzl'd Fruits, and Crazy Core, including fun—size Smarties—(the small pastel–colored candies sold in rolls and made by Ce De). Also Candy Money, Candy Necklace, Easter Smarties, Giant Smarties, Giant Smarties Pops, Love Hearts, Mega Smarties, Smarties in a Pouch, Tropical Smarties, Smarties Double Lollies, Smarties Mega Lollies, Smarties Parties, Smarties Pops, and X—TREME Sour Smarties. Manufacturer states: These products contains NO: gluten, milk, egg, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts, or soy. (US only, NOT gluten-free in Canada). Skor Toffee Bars - All Snickers Bars (all flavors) Snickers Fudge bar Sno—Caps Sno—Cone Soda Pop So Delicious Dairy Free Coconut Milk Candy Corn So Delicious Dairy Free Coconut Milk Peppermint Star Sour Patch Spooky Candy Rings (eyeballs, Frankenstein heads and other shapes on rings) Starburst Fruit Chews and fun—size Starburst Gummibursts and Sour Gummibursts Stonyfield Organic Mixed Berry Fruit Snacks Stonyfield Organic Strawberry Fruit Snacks Sugar Babies Sugar Daddy Caramel Pops Sugar Mama Caramels Super Bubble bubble gum Surf Sweets Gummy Worms Surf Sweets Gummy Swirls Surf Sweets Gummy Bears Surf SweetsFruity Bears Surf Sweets Jelly Beans Surf Sweets Sour Worms Surf Sweets Sour Berry Bears Swedish Fish Sweet's All American Mint Taffy Sweet's Apple Fruit Sours Sweet's Banana Taffy Sweet's Black Licorice Taffy Sweet's Blue Raspberry Taffy Sweet's Bubble Gum Taffy Sweet's Buttered Popcorn Taffy Sweet's Candy Cane Taffy Sweet's Candy Corn Sweet's Candy Corn Taffy Sweet's Caramel Apple Taffy Sweet's Caramel Taffy Sweet's Cherry Cola Taffy Sweet's Cherry Fruit Sours Sweet's Cherry Hearts Sweet's Cherry Taffy Sweet's Chocolate Bridge Mix Sweet's Chocolate Cinnamon Bears Sweet's Chocolate Hazelnut taffy Sweet's Chocolate Peanut Clusters Sweet's Chocolate Peanuts Sweet's Chocolate Raisins Sweet's Chocolate Taffy Sweet's Chocolate Wonder Mints Sweet's Cinnamon Bears Sweet's Cinnamon Bunnies Sweet's Cinnamon Hearts Sweet's Cinnamon Lips Sweet's Cinnamon Santa's Sweet's Cinnamon Squares Sweet's Cinnamon Taffy Sweet's Cookie Dough Taffy Sweet's Cotton Candy Taffy Sweet's Egg Nog Taffy Sweet's Fish Sweet's Fruit Slices Sweet's Fruit Sours Sweet's Grape Fruit Sours Sweet's Guava Taffy Sweet's Gum Drops Sweet's Holiday Trees Sweet's Honey Taffy Sweet's Hot Shots Sweet's Huckleberry Taffy Sweet's Jelly Beans Sweet's Jelly Beans Sweet's Key Lime Taffy Sweet's Key lime Taffy Sweet's Lemon Fruit Sours Sweet's Marshmallow Bears Sweet's Natural Fish Sweet's Natural Lemonade rings Sweet's Natural Nummy Bears Sweet's Natural Sour Worms Sweet's Neapolitan Taffy Sweet's Orange Dark chocolate Jewels Sweet's Orange Milk chocolate Jewels Sweet's Orange Slices Sweet's Orange Slices Sweet's Orange Sticks Sweet's Orange/Vanilla Taffy Sweet's Peach Taffy Sweet's Peanut Clusters (available in both milk and dark chocolate) Sweet's Peppermint Taffy Sweet's Pink Grapefruit Sours Sweet's Raspberry Dark Chocolate Jewels Sweet's Raspberry Milk Chocolate Jewels Sweet's Raspberry Sticks Sweet's Raspberry Taffy Sweet's Red and Green fruit Sours Sweet's Red Licorice Taffy Sweet's Root Beer Taffy Sweet's Rum Taffy Sweet's S'more's Taffy Sweet's Scandinavian Swimmers Sweet's Sour Bunnies Sweet's Sour Stars Sweet's Sour Stars Sweet's Strawberry and Banana Taffy Sweet's Strawberry and Crème Taffy Sweet's Strawberry Taffy Sweet's Sugar free Cinnamon Bear cubbies Sweet's Sweet's Candy Pebbles Sweet's Vanilla Taffy Sweet's Watermelon Taffy Sweet's Wild berry Taffy Sweet's Wonder mints Sweethearts conversation hearts Forbidden Fruits (candy packaging of The Twilight Saga, New Moon the movie) Sweet's Candy Corn Taffy T Tasty Brand Fruit Gummies- Citrus Splash Tasty Brand Fruit Gummies- Smoothie Tasty Brand Fruit Gummies- Super fruit Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Citrus Splash Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Mixed Fruit Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Scary Berry Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Smoothie Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Spooky Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Super fruit Tasty Brand Organic Fruit Snacks- Wild Berry Tic Tacs Tootsie Caramel Apple Pops Tootsie Pops—original and mini Tootsie Fruit Rolls Tootsie Peppermint Pops Tootsie Rolls Tropical Dots Tootsie Rolls Midgies and snack bars Topps — Baby Bottle Pop, Ring Pops, Push Pops, Ring Pop Gummies, Bazooka Gum, Bazooka Gum Nuggets Trader Joe's Citrus Gum Drops Trader Joe's Mango Taffy Trader Joe's Sour Gummies Transformers Candy Mix—gummy shields, fruit chews, candy shields, gum rocks Tropical Stormz Pops TruJoy Fruit Chews TruJoy Organic Choco Chews TruSweet Jelly Beans TruSweet Gummy Bears TruSweet Fruity Hearts TruSweet Fruity Bears TruSweet Gummy Worms TruSweet Sour Worms TruSweet Sour Berry Bears TruSweet Watermelon Rings TruSweet Peach Rings TruSweet Spring Mix Jelly Beans TruSweet Spooky Spiders TruSweet Organic Fruity Bears TruSweet Organic Fruity Hearts TruSweet Organic Jelly Beans TruSweet Organic Peach Rings TruSweet Organic Watermelon Rings Twist and Glow, Twist and Glow Heart, Twist and Glow Pumpkin Two Moms in the Raw Gluten Free Almond Butter Cacao Truffles Two Moms in the Raw Almond Butter Cayenne Truffles Two Moms in the Raw Almond Butter Green Tea Vanilla Truffles U Unreal Halloween Treats Unreal Dark Chocolate Almond Butter Cups Unreal Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Unreal Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups with Coconut Unreal Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups with Crispy Quinoa Unreal Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Unreal Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups with Crispy Quinoa V Vosges Haut Chocolate Bacon Dark Chocolate Bar Vosges Haut Chocolate Coconut & Cherry Caramel Bar Vosges Haut Chocolate Crispy Carrot Bar W Warheads Extreme Sour hard candy and Sour QBZ chewy cubes Warheads Sour Chewy Cubes Warheads Super Sour Spray, Sour Dippers, Double Drops Welches Fruit Snacks—All flavors Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter Banana Cup Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter and Cherry Cup Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter and Toasted Coconut Cup Wild Ophelia Peanut Butter and Smoked Salt Cup Wonka Bottlecaps Wonka Chocolate Laffy Taffy Wonka Giant Chewy Nerds Jelly Beans Wonka Giant Pixy Stix Wonka Gobstopper Everlasting Wonka Gobstopper Chewy Wonka Fruit Tart Chews Wonka Fun Dip and Fun Dip Sour Wonka Laffy Taffy Ropes Wonka Mix–Ups Wonka Monster Mix–Ups—SweetTarts Skulls and Bones, Spooky Nerds, Howlin' Laffy Taffy Wonka Nerds—carry a cross contamination warning on the Spooky Nerds orange and fruit punch flavors Wonka Pixy Stix Wrigley's Gum Wrigley’s Creme Savers X X–scream Mouth Morphers Fruit Gushers Y York Peppermint Patties - All Except York Pieces Candy, York Minis, and York Shapes (5 oz.)s YumEarth Organic Fruit Snacks YumEarth Gummy Fruits Z Zed Candy Skulls and Bones Zip-A-Dee-Mini Pops With all these selections, finding some good, gluten–free candy should be a snap. As always, be sure to read labels, as some ingredients can vary. **WARNING! THESE UNSAFE CANDIES CONTAIN OR MAY CONTAIN GLUTEN: AIRHEADS Packaging states that Airheads are: "Manufactured in a facility that processes wheat flour." Airheads.com FAQs state that: "Airheads do not contain gluten; however, they are processed in a facility that uses wheat flour, so the company does not guarantee that Airheads are gluten-free. Airheads Xtremes Rolls contains wheat flour ALTOIDS Contain gluten as wheat maltodextrin ANNABELLE'S Abba Zabba—contains: peanuts, soybean oil and soy lecithin, wheat/gluten Big Hunk—Package statement: "made in a facility that uses milk, egg, tree nuts, wheat and peanuts" Look—Contains: milk, peanuts, soy lecithin, eggs, wheat/gluten Rocky Road, Rocky Road Mint, Rocky Road Dark—Contain wheat/gluten Uno—Contains: milk, almonds, soy lecithin, wheat/gluten AMERICAN LICORICE CO. Sour Punch Sticks, Twists, Bits, Bites, Straws—contains wheat/gluten Red Vines—all varieties and flavors contain wheat/gluten BEE INTERNATIONAL Zombee Bloody Bites (glow in the dark plastic fangs with oozing candy blood bags) Zombee Candy Corn (in a tall tube with plastic pumpkin lid) Package statement: "Made in a facility that also processes milk, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts." BRACH'S All Brach's candy should be considered NOT gluten–free! Please be careful, as I have seen Brach's candies included on gluten-free safe lists! Brach's Candy Corn, Brach's Jelly Bean Nougats, and Brach's Halloween Mellowcremes ARE all processed in a facility that processes wheat. CADBURY ADAMS Sour Patch Xploderz CHUCKLES Chuckles Ju Jubes CVS Candy Corn, Autumn Mix, Candy Pumpkins Ingredients free of: wheat/gluten, milk, tree nuts, peanuts Package statement: "This product was packaged in a facility where other products containing peanuts, tree nuts, milk, wheat, soy and egg are also packaged." DOVE CHOCOLATE Milk chocolate cinnamon graham/cookies and cream, and some holiday varieties, such as milk chocolate truffles FARLEY'S AND SATHERS Harvest Mix and Candy Corn—This product is made by Brach's. All Brach's candies are considered to contain gluten. See Brach's listings. Heide candies—Jujyfruits, Jujubes, Red Raspberry Dollars, Red Hot Dollars Wild Cherry, Heide Gummi Bears Super Bubble and Super Bubble Blast Trolli Gummi Bears, Trolli Sour Brite (Frite) Crawlers "Packaged on equipment that packages products containing traces of milk, wheat, egg, peanuts, tree nuts and/or soy protein." FERRERO Ferrero Rocher Chocolates FLIX Bag of Boogers Gummies — "Manufactured in a facility that processes gluten (wheat), milk, egg, peanuts, tree nuts and soy." FRANKFORD Frankford Fun Size Mix (Peanut Butter, Caramel and Crispy Chocolate Covered Candies) Crispy Candies SpongeBob Gummy Krabby Patties GOETZE Goetze's Caramel Creams, Cow Tales—Contain wheat flour, milk, and soy HARIBO Bears (the package now says: Dextrose - wheat or corn) Black Licorice Wheels Brixx Clark Bars Fruity Pasta Konfekt and Pontefract Cakes Red Licorice Wheels Sour S'ghetti HERSHEY Hershey Snack Sized Bars — ALL Kit Kat—contains wheat Mr. Goodbar Reese's Minis Reese's Peanut Butter Pumpkins Reese's Seasonal Rolo Minis Twizzlers—contains wheat Whoppers—contains barley malt and wheat flour Hershey's Bliss (Milk Chocolate, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Milk Chocolate with Meltaway Center, White Chocolate with Meltaway Center, Milk Chocolate with Raspberry Meltaway Center, Dark Chocolate)—No gluten ingredients, but not on Hershey's official gluten-free list. Hershey's Special Dark Bar (note that this is confusing, since several other Special Dark products are considered gluten-free, so make sure you know what you're buying) Hershey's Cookies 'N' Creme Bar Hershey's Milk Chocolate Drops Hershey's Miniatures (any flavor, including flavors that are considered gluten-free in larger sizes) Mr. Goodbar Symphony Bar Hershey's Extra Dark Chocolate Hershey's Kisses that do not appear on the gluten-free list above Hershey's Good & Plenty Hershey's Mr. Goodbar fun size Hershey's Twizzlers, Flavored Twists IMPACT CONFECTIONS Warheads Sour Twists—contain wheat/gluten, milk Warheads Sour Jelly Beans—made in facility shared with wheat, peanuts, milk, egg and soy Warheads Sour Candy Canes—contain soy; made in facility shared with wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, and soy Warheads Sour Coolers—contains oat fiber MARS and WRIGLEY Mars Bar Mars Combos (a snack mix) M&M White Chocolate, Mint and M&M Coconut flavors—Check individual packages to be sure M&M Pretzel flavor and some M&M seasonal flavors Milky Way—contains barley malt Twix—contains wheat NESTLE Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx—contains wheat flour Butterfinger Giant Bar Butterfinger Hearts Butterfinger Jingles Butterfinger Medallions Butterfinger Pumpkins Butterfinger Snackerz Butterfinger Stixx Chewy Spree Crunch—contains barley malt Everlasting Gobstopper Hundred Grand Bar—contains barley malt Kit Kat Bar 100 Grand Bar—contains barley malt Sweetarts—Contain both maltodextrin and dextrin, which can be made from wheat and barley, and are not listed on Nestle’s gluten-free candy list) Wonka Bar (all flavors) Wonka Gummies Wonka Kazoozles Wonka Nerds Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten–free. Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten–free. NEWMAN'S OWN Organic Dark Chocolate & Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups (Made on equipment that processes products containing peanuts, tree nuts, milk, wheat, soybean and egg products.) PALMER Palmer Bag of Boo's fudge bars Palmer Tricky Treats (mix of Googley Eyes, Boneheads, and Pumpkin Patch chocolate candies) Palmer Trick or Treat Mix Palmer Peppermint Patties RUSSELL STOVER'S—Russell Stover's products are produced on equipment that also processes peanuts, tree nuts, eggs and wheat gluten. YORK York Pieces, York Minis and York Shapes WONKA Wonka Bar Wonka Chewy Runts Wonka Chewy Spree Wonka Giant and Mini Chewy SweeTarts Wonka Nerds Wonka Oompas Wonka Runts Wonka Runts Chewy Wonka SweetTarts Wonka Sweetarts (regular) Wonka Sweetarts Chew Wonka Sweetarts Chewy Twists Wonka Sweetarts Giant Chewy Wonka Sweetarts Mini Chewy Wonka Shockers Wonka Sweetarts Gummy Bugs—contains wheat/gluten Wonka Sweetarts Rope—contains wheat/gluten Wonka Sweetarts Shockers Wonka Tart N Tinys Wonka Tart N Tinys Chew Wonka SweetTarts Boo Bag Mix Additional information and lists of gluten-free safe and unsafe Halloween candies can be found at: About.com Celiac.com Celiaccentral.com CeliacSupportAssociation.org Celiacfamily.com DivineCaroline.com Foodallergyfeast Glutenawayblog.com Glutenfreefacts Gluten Intolerance Group Medpedia Surefoodliving.com Urbantastebud.com Verywellfit.com Here is a partial list of major candy manufacturers and how to contact them: Adams & Brooks American Licorice Co. BEE International Ferrara Candy Company Ferrero Rocher FLIX Gimbal's Fine Candies Goetze's Candy Company Hershey's. Here's a link to Hershey's official gluten-free list. Impact Confections Jelly Belly Just Born. Here's a link to Just Born Gluten-free FAQs Justin’s Nut Butters products are certified gluten-free by the Gluten-Free Certification Organization, which requires products to have less than 10 parts per million of gluten in them. Kraft Foods Mars Chocolate Necco Nestle USA Palmer Pearson's PEZ Pop Rocks Tootsie Roll —Tootsie Roll Industries, which also makes Charms products, says that, as of fall 2018, all of the company's confections are considered gluten-free except Andes cookies. "Tootsie does not use wheat, barley, rye, oats, triticale, spelt, or any of their components, either as ingredients or as part of the manufacturing process. Corn and soy products are used during the manufacturing process," the company says.
  3. Celiac.com 02/03/2018 - People with celiac disease need to avoid consuming products that contain gluten, including those made with wheat, rye and barley. So, what about Annatto color? You may know annatto color as one of those common ingredients in food. Annatto color is used to color yellow or orange cheese. To make matters more confusing, annatto color still appears on some old, outdated lists as not gluten-free, and unsafe. Many of these listings of supposedly problematic ingredients were based "solely on guesses and suspicions." As such, they commonly promoted incorrect or incomplete information. Annatto color is derived from the seeds of the Achiote, also known as the Lipstick tree (Bixa orellana), it is often used in cheese, but also in many other orange-colored foods. Achiote seeds do not contain gluten. Annatto color is gluten-free and generally safe for people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet. Some people with celiac disease do claim sensitivity to annatto color, but they are likely not reacting to gluten. Annatto color appears on Celiac.com's list of safe and gluten-free foods. Here's a helpful bit by a member Celiac.com's gluten-free forum, named Richard: "Annatto is gluten-free. Without question. I suspect your info came from CSA/USA, which for years put out bad information about ingredients based solely on guesses and suspicions." For years, some celiac organizations warned members that annatto might cause gluten-like reactions. They cited concerns about the "processing of the seed into a colorant that causes concern as it appears to use alcohol in the process. There is also suspicion that caramel color may be included in the annatto colorant. Anecdotal evidence has some celiacs reacting to foods with annatto color in them but this may be a non-celiac reaction to the annatto itself." So, the shorthand is that annatto coloring is gluten-free and generally safe for people with celiac disease. Folks who cannot tolerate annatto coloring are not reacting to gluten, but to something else.
  4. Celiac.com 01/25/2018 - People with celiac disease need to avoid consuming products that contain gluten, including those made with wheat, rye and barley. So, what about spelt? Is spelt gluten-free? Is spelt safe for people with celiac disease? The short answer is no, spelt is not gluten-free, and no, spelt is not safe for people with celiac disease. On problem is that many products that contain spelt are labeled "Wheat-Free." Plenty of food that includes spelt claims that spelt is easier on the digestive system than wheat. It has also been called a "wheat alternative." This has caused some confusion around spelt. Some people point out that spelt has a different structure than standard commercial wheat. That's true, but the differences are very slight. In fact, spelt shares about 98.5% of its DNA with wheat. So, many people believe that if you can't eat wheat, then it is okay to eat spelt, but that is false. At least if you have celiac disease or a genuine sensitivity to gluten. Spelt contains gluten. Eating spelt means eating gluten. Spelt is not safe for people with celiac disease. Remember, products labeled wheat-free are not necessarily gluten-free. People with celiac disease should avoid spelt. They should also always confirm that food is gluten-free. If you're not sure about an ingredient in a product, consult the Celiac.com Safe and Unsafe lists. Resources: https://www.celiac.com/articles/182/1/Unsafe-Gluten-Free-Food-List-Unsafe-Ingredients/Page1.html https://celiac.org/live-gluten-free/glutenfreediet/sources-of-gluten/ https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/23425-the-question-of-spelt/ http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1094/CCHEM.1999.76.4.548/abstract;jsessionid=19F8EE3B345F8A292A5BD35006F63333.f01t02 https://www.glutenfreedietitian.com/spelt-is-wheat-dont-eat/
  5. Celiac.com 12/08/2017 - A quick glance at many pet and livestock food labels will show that they contain corn gluten feed (CGF) and corn gluten meal (CGM). But don't worry. Unlike wheat, barley and rye, corn is naturally gluten-free, as are corn gluten feed and corn gluten meal, says Randy Wiedmeier, livestock specialist with University of Missouri Extension. Addressing concerns from people with celiac disease and/or gluten-intolerance over the presence of corn gluten in their livestock feed, Wiedmeier stressed that "Corn gluten meal is a byproduct of processing corn. There is no true gluten in corn, but simply corn proteins." He stated that he had no idea who came up with the terms corn gluten feed and corn gluten meal, but that they are "obviously misnomers." He added his assurances that it is "perfectly safe to consume meat, milk or eggs produced by farm animals consuming corn gluten feed or corn gluten meal." Even if corn gluten contained actual wheat gluten, it would not be a problem, as anything eaten and digested by an animal is absorbed into the animal's body, and "reassembled by the animal's metabolism into proteins specific to that animal, not back into gluten that would show up in the animal products," said Wiedmeier. So, if you have celiac disease or gluten intolerance, you don't have to worry if you see corn gluten listed as an ingredient in your favorite pet food or livestock feed. It is corn-based and gluten-free, and is unlikely to harm you or your pet. Additional information can be found online at missouri.edu. Source: Newsleader.com
  6. Celiac.com 12/07/2017 - Amaranth is naturally gluten-free and usually safe for people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. Amaranth is not actually a grain, but is considered a pseudo-cereal like it's cousin, quinoa. Both are part of the same large family that includes beets, chard and spinach. Amaranth is highly nutritious, and contains about one-third more protein than rice, sorghum, or rye. It also contains high levels of calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and fiber, together with a nearly perfect amino acid profile. So, amaranth is good to include in just about any diet, but especially for gluten-free folks looking for more nutritious options. Cooked amaranth is very similar to cooked quinoa, with similar nutty taste and chewy texture, although cooke amaranth is not quite as fluffy as quinoa. Like quinoa, it's important to soak amaranth thoroughly before cooking. As with buckwheat and quinoa, you can also bake with amaranth flour. If you're looking for something more nutritious than brown rice and other flours, then amaranth flour may be a good fit. Here are some recipes that use amaranth flour. Also, amaranth is more comparable to wheat in terms of the chewy, sticky characters needed for baking, so it's a good addition to many gluten-free breads. You'll likely still need xanthin gum, but probably less of it. Like rice, or quinoa, amaranth goes great in soup. Here's a recipe for stuffed chicken breasts with oatmeal and amaranth.
  7. Celiac.com 11/18/2017 - Just looking at its name, one might wonder if buckwheat is safe for people on a gluten-free diet. However, unlike its name, buckwheat does not naturally contain any wheat or gluten. As a result, buckwheat is considered safe for people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet. Turns out that buckwheat and wheat are from different, unrelated botanical families. As with quinoa, buckwheat is the seed of a flowering plant, as such it is not considered a grain or a cereal. Buckwheat is actually closely related to rhubarb. It is an excellent source of fiber and nutrients. A serving of cooked buckwheat groats, the small triangular seeds, offers 17 grams of dietary fiber and 22 grams of protein. Buckwheat is not only nutritious, but it contains rutin, a compound shown to strengthen capillary walls and improve circulation. As such, buckwheat, is also regarded as beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. As with grains, buckwheat can become contaminated with wheat during processing, transportation or if it is grown in fields also used to grow wheat. To make sure your buckwheat is gluten-free, it is important to find certified gluten-free buckwheat. Also, remember that some products labled as buckwheat may include wheat flour, so double check to make sure your product is labled gluten-free. Otherwise, buckwheat is a healthy, nutritious gluten-free alternative for people with celiac disease.
  8. Celiac.com 11/15/2017 - Quinoa is regarded as safe for people with celiac disease. For many years, some celiac support groups listed quinoa as unsafe due to cross-contamination concerns. But any grain is unsafe for celiacs if it is contaminated with wheat, rye or barley. Some grains have a higher risk of such contamination, others have a low risk. Based on its low risk for cross-contamination, Celiac.com has had quinoa on our safe list since 1995. A vast amount of evidence supports that listing. The latest research shows that celiac patients can safely tolerate up to 50 g of quinoa daily for 6 weeks. The researchers in this test point out that further studies are needed to assess long-term effects of quinoa consumption. In the short-term test, the researchers looked at 19 treated celiac patients who ate 50 g of quinoa every day for 6 weeks as part of their regular gluten-free diet. The team evaluated diet, serology, and gastrointestinal parameters, and made histological assessments of 10 patients, both before and after they consumed quinoa. The results show that celiac patients seem to tolerate quinoa well, and it doesn't trigger any symptoms or cause any gut damage or dysfunction. The team found normal gut structure and mucosa to confirm that assessment. In fact, patients saw a general improvement histological and serological results, so better gut conditions and less blood antibodies to gluten in patients who ate quinoa. Celiac patients who ate quinoa for 6 weeks also experienced a mild reduction in blood pressure. Overall, this is the first clinical study to show that celiac patients can safely tolerate up to 50 g of quinoa daily for 6 weeks. Obviously, future studies need to look at the safety of long-term quinoa consumption. That said, quinoa seems to be safe for celiac patients on a gluten-free diet. If you really want to be sure, quinoa grown in main producer countries of Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador, where practically no wheat is grown, is probably the safest bet for those on a gluten-free diet.
  9. Celiac.com 08/14/2017 - Pizza chain Papa John's is warning consumers that its new gluten-free pizza is not safe for people with celiac disease or serious gluten intolerance. After announcing on Monday that it was introducing a gluten-free crust made with sorghum, teff, amaranth, and quinoa at locations across the US, the company warned that it does not recommend the crust for people with a serious gluten intolerance. An official statement from the company reads in part: "Papa John's employs procedures to prevent contact with gluten…it is possible that a pizza with gluten-free crust could be exposed to gluten during the in-store, pizza-making process. Therefore, the brand does not recommend its Gluten-Free Crust made with Ancient Grains for customers with Celiac Disease or serious gluten intolerances." This gluten-free pizza dustup is similar to efforts by Dominos to debut a gluten-free crust, but not a gluten-free pizza. Now, can major pizza makers actually produce a gluten-free pizza for those who need it? Yes. Take Pizza Hut, for example, which has worked hard to offer a genuinely gluten-free pizza experience. Pizza Hut strives to serve certifiably gluten-free pizzas by storing ingredients in designated gluten-free kits. Workers wear gloves to prepare the pizzas, bake the pizzas on parchment paper, and use a designated gluten-free pizza cutter. Even so, Pizza Hut website says it cannot guarantee that the pizza is prepared in a 100% gluten free environment, and that customers should consult a medical advisor before ordering. So, that's your slice of gluten-free pizza insight for now. Read more at: businessinsider.com
  10. Celiac.com 06/17/2017 - Hello, my name is Gerry. I am a certified Medical Technologist currently working as a Clinical Systems Analyst. I was diagnosed with celiac disease in 2006 by blood/biopsy. I have two wonderful children, 1 of whom has screened positive for a celiac gene pair. My strong background in Medical Technology assured a quick diagnosis once symptoms appeared. Since then, I have been living a strict gluten-free life. I have gone through nutritional counseling at Mayo Clinic and have an enhanced background with my understanding of the world of gluten. I use my experience and knowledge to accurately base my decisions on whether a product is safe for me. To prove my diet to be effective, I have had my TTG levels measured every 6 months since 2006—all were negative. Also, I have had 3 biopsies after beginning my gluten-free life and all were negative for villous atrophy. I do understand that my medical follow-ups do not prove that I am not ingesting small amounts of gluten; they simply indicate that I am not reacting. As for me, I view the gluten-free life to be much simpler and cheaper than it once was, and fear that strict gluten labeling guidelines have the potential to negatively shape the gluten-free life that I know and live today. Within the last few years, I have been receiving emails to ask my support regarding the FDA's gluten-free labeling rule. At first, I was a supporter as I wanted to support the celiac community since I was part of it. However, after I sat down and really thought about it, I am questioning the benefits of a strict gluten labeling act. In fact, I am predicting a negative impact if gluten labeling guidelines are too strict. When I started my gluten-free life in 2006, my grocery bill was atrocious. I was paying very high prices for the simplest of things. Tortilla chips $3.89 for a 6 oz bag. $3.99 for 8 oz of mustard. $5.99 for gluten-free mayonnaise. As the years moved on I noticed two changes that positively impacted my life as a celiac. The first is that many manufacturers have a list of their gluten-free products on their website along with explanations of how their company handles gluten. The second is the fact that many generic/in-store-brand companies are now labeling their products as "Gluten Free" or "Naturally Gluten free". Because of these two advancements, my life is so much easier and much more cost effective. This makes it easy to stick with my diet and keep my health safe and spirits up. Currently, if a product is made without gluten, it can be labeled as "gluten-free". Many products are available at a fraction of the cost and they are safe. Now that my family eats gluten-free, I have noticed that in today's world my grocery bill seems much more normal and realistic: gluten-free mustard $1.29; gluten-free mayonnaise $1.59;20 oz bags of tortilla chips labeled gluten-free $2.59; 8 oz bag of gluten-free cheese $1.99. You see, living a gluten-free life with today's rules is easy and I believe it to be safe if we are careful and make educated decisions. At this time we have many inexpensive non-brand/in-store brand name products that are widely available. I know of some stores that have 20+ pages of gluten-free items on an excel spreadsheet for their own brand of products, including medications. There are stores that update these lists quarterly, and most are listed by bar-code number. I can simply print the list and buy all of my products safely and inexpensively. I could easily make a phone call to clarify items that I may disagree with, or inquire about cross-contamination. Are these products that I speak of above tested for gluten? I don't believe so. Are these products free of gluten ingredients? I trust that they are. Is there cross-contamination? Maybe. It is easy for me to call and ask about their product lines. Are these products safe for me? I believe so, as I have the blood tests to prove they have been safe for me. Phone calls to companies on products that are not labeled as "gluten-free" are still the norm even though they are getting less frequent. As an expert, I am able to screen who I am talking to and the company's knowledge about gluten. I have been able to make accurate judgments on these products as well as deciding whether I believe them to be safe. In many of the cases, the company claimed their product to be free of gluten and I felt comfortable consuming the product. Yes, there were companies that didn't have acceptable knowledge/quality control and I didn't feel these products were safe so I didn't consume them. My first question to the celiac community is this. Do we need a strict gluten-free labeling act when we already have companies testing for gluten and providing safe products? If we want our products batch tested for gluten, we can simply purchase the ones that are currently available as there are many. If we want to know the threshold that the company considers as gluten-free, we can call them and they will tell us. Are there currently batch tested gluten-free products on the market? Absolutely. Many companies state on their packaging that they have been tested to under 20 or 40 ppm. If a company is testing, they make it known on the label and in the price of the product. My next question is what will a strict gluten-free labeling act do for us? I believe that it will ensure that a product is safe for celiac patients defining what a product needs to be in order to be labeled as gluten-free. Simple-yes. How do we suppose a company is going to know if their product is gluten-free? Well, if you ask me, it will NEED to be tested. Who will pay for this testing? I believe that the celiac community (the consumers) will be paying for this in higher food prices. If a company has to test a product to label it gluten-free, the price will need to go up in order to pay the cost of the testing and the quality control program for the company. We know this to be true as these products are already accessible. I see a possible negative impact of this labeling act if it were to be made too strict. I believe that manufacturers that do not test for gluten may need to pull their "gluten-free" labeling from the package. This could eliminate most of the inexpensive safe products that I currently purchase today. We know there are many manufacturers out there that label products as gluten-free as they simply do not use gluten ingredients. I believe these products may recede. I am not so sure a company will be able to label these products as gluten-free without first testing them. Even if they are allowed, I am not so sure they will take the risk. Therefore negatively impacting our pricing/availability. Will Gluten free lists on websites go away too? I believe these could fade or be at risk as well. If there is a law/act that dictates the amount of gluten in a product, I would think that a company would not create gluten-free lists of products without proving them to be gluten-free by some form of testing in an attempt to avoid legal action against them. What about our phone calls to companies asking if their products are gluten-free? Will they have a gluten-free list to review? I would tend to think that they may not be provided with a gluten-free list to reference. I have a hunch they may say, "We do not test any of our products for gluten and therefore are unable to tell you whether the product is gluten-free". I know that reply will complicate my life in many ways. The first thing that comes to my mind, in this regard, are the calls to pharmaceutical companies regarding medications. I feel that there are better ways to change the labeling as we know it that would offer a more positive effect on the celiac community. Maybe just changing the package labeling to force companies to list wheat, oats, rye, and barley on the packaging. How about requiring mandatory labeling of products that share lines with "gluten" containing ingredients? When we look at the big picture, I think it is safe to theorize that the impact of strict gluten labeling guidelines goes far beyond just providing safe products. In conclusion, I ask these questions. Will a strict gluten labeling act have the potential to negatively impact the celiac community by increasing prices and decreasing availability? And lastly, have we looked at the possible outcomes from all angles?
  11. Celiac.com 05/01/2017 - To avoid symptoms, and promote full gut healing, people with celiac disease should follow a strict gluten-free diet. Oats might increase the nutritional value of a gluten-free diet, but their inclusion for people with celiac disease remains controversial, and data have been conflicting. A team of researchers recently set out to determine the safety of adding oats to a gluten-free diet for patients with celiac disease. The research team included María Inés Pinto-Sánchez, Natalia Causada-Calo, Premysl Bercik, Alexander C. Ford, Joseph A. Murray, David Armstrong, Carol Semrad, Sonia S. Kupfer, Armin Alaedini, Paul Moayyedi, Daniel A. Leffler, and Elena F. Verdú. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine, Farncombe Family Digestive Research Institute, McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, the Leeds Gastroenterology Institute, St. James's University Hospital in Leeds, UK, the Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences at the University of Leeds in Leeds, UK, the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester in Minnesota, US, the Celiac Disease Center at University of Chicago Medicine in Chicago, Illinois, US, the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University, New York City, New York, US, and the Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, US. For their systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical and observational studies, the team searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases for clinical trials and observational studies on the effects of including oats in gluten-free diet of celiac patients. The studies reported patient symptoms, serology test results, and histologic assessments. The team used the GRADE approach to assess the evidence. Out of 433 total studies, the team found 28 that met their criteria for analysis. Of these, 6 were randomized and 2 were not-randomized controlled trials comprising a total of 661 patients. The remaining studies were observational. All randomized controlled trials used pure, uncontaminated oats. Their results showed that celiac patients who consumed oats for 12 months experienced no change in symptoms, histologic scores, intraepithelial lymphocyte counts, or serologic test results. To provide a more authoritative conclusion, they call for clinical double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trials, using commonly available oats sourced from different regions. Source: Gastroenterology
  12. Do you know what I miss so much at summer BBQs? Veggie burgers. I don't mean the ones that taste like fake meat, I mean those ones that are made from grains, beans or legumes, maybe some cheese. Does anyone have any suggestions? I'm quite sensitive, so certified gluten free is best, but I'd be happy to research non-certified suggestions as well.
  13. Just wanted to share this email I received on Jan 20th 2014 from Harney and Sons Fine Teas: "Thank you for your interest in our teas. All of our teas are gluten-free with one possible exception. The Soba [roasted buckwheat] comes from a supplier that handles gluten products so it may contain traces."
  14. I am moving in with my boyfriend and I need some advice. He is a gluten eater but is going to go gluten and soy free for me as I am very sensitive. I have celiac as well as a soy allergy. Well when I moved into my current apartment I spent almost a week straight cleaning and recleaning the kitchen and dishwasher, oven etc to try to sanitize it as best as humanly possible to reduce my chances of cross contamination. So what I would like to know is: 1. what are the best ways to absolutely scrub the living hell out of the kitchen that was full of gluten so it's safe for me? 2. best way to really clean the dishwasher? When I lived with my parents I was constantly very ill from cross contamination from the dishwasher, so is there a cleaner or something I can run through there to really strip it of anything dangerous to me? What about the silverware rack if it has nicks and cuts from knives? The one in my current apartment was like that so I completely tossed it so I wouldn't even have the risk. But I would hate to do that to him if I could just deep bleach it or something. I just want to get everything as safe as I possibly can because CC is something that really hits me and I cannot afford to live with that.
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