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Found 8 results

  1. Celiac.com 01/16/2019 - Sales data from the EU show sales of free-from products rising steadily through 2017, in both Western and Eastern Europe. Euromonitor International reveals that total “free-from” food sales in those regions rose 11.7% and 8.7% respectively. Makers of free-from food products have typically targeted consumers suffering from dietary intolerances, and gluten intolerances. Indeed, dairy- and gluten-free foods led the 2017 growth figures, rising about 13% each, according to Euromonitor. Interestingly, though demand for free-from foods is expanding into new markets, Euromonitor’s 2017 data shows that most new consumers of free-from products do not suffer from a medical condition or food intolerance that requires specialized food. Rather, new consumers are overwhelmingly free from food allergies or intolerances. Meanwhile, even though growth in the allergen-free category, in general, stood at an anemic 1.3% in the combined region, the growth rate in the less developed markets of Eastern Europe stood out at 9.2%. Mintel notes that 12% of all UK food product launches in 2015 carried a gluten-free claim, more than double the 2011 rate of 7%. The data show that the public currently perceives free-from foods as generally healthier than their counterparts. This perception of health is a key market driver and has helped push the base of consumers beyond the traditional group of allergy or intolerance sufferers. Along with organics, health and wellness products have recorded the largest overall growth at a global level. However, this reality leaves the free-from food category vulnerable to changes in perception. Indeed, research from Mintel found that more than half of consumers who currently buy free-from products would stop doing so if they thought they were "less healthy" than standard offerings. To solidify and expand their product appeal, look for makers of free-from foods to improve the nutritional profile of their products, reducing sugars, fats, and salt, and to offer more grains, such as amaranth, quinoa, sorghum, buckwheat, millet and teff, among other strategies. Overall, look for new healthier, more nutritious breads, breakfast cereals, and snack bars to fill the shelves as consumers continue their quest for healthier, more nutritious foods. That’s generally good news for free-from consumers who do have food allergies or intolerances. It likely means more nutritious, better tasting, better quality gluten-free, dairy-free and other free-from products in the future. Read the full report at Mintel.com (Paywall).
  2. Celiac.com 03/28/2017 - A savvy Girl Scout from New Jersey is close to selling more cookies than anyone in history thanks to her brutal reviews of the sweet treats that have gone viral. Employing brutally honest cookie reviews, skilled networking and aggressive sales tactics, 11-year-old Charlotte McCourt set a new Girl Scout cookie-selling world record by selling 21,477 boxes of cookies, shattering the 35 year old previous record. Originally, Charlotte was aiming to sell at least 300 boxes. As part of her effort, McCourt rated all of her cookies on a scale from 1 to 10, and included frankly worded reviews. She then emailed the rankings and reviews of her offerings to her dad's "rich" friend in hopes of swaying him to purchase a bulk of her 300-box goal. For example, Charlotte rated the gluten-free Toffee-tastic cookies a , calling them a "bleak, flavorless gluten-free wasteland." She also slammed Do-si-dos as "unoriginal." She did praise Samoas, the crisp cookie with shredded coconut, caramel and chocolate, rating them a 9. The wealthy pal, who was revealed Wednesday to be Colorado-based venture capitalist Jason Mendelson, was blown away when he received the sales pitch from McCourt. Mendelson, childhood friends with McCourt's father, Sean, was sold on her pitch, immediately buying 25 boxes and donating them all to the military. "As I'm reading her plea, all I can think is, 'My God, I'm a venture capitalist. I get pitched 30 to 40 times a day. This is an 11-year-old telling me exactly what she wants. There's no beating around the bush,'" he told The Post. "It is a master class on sales," he added. Later, Sean's boss, TV personality Mike Rowe, shared the email with his Facebook followers, reading it and cracking up at the gutsy critique. Rowe's video, called "Truth In Advertising!" was uploaded Jan. 25 and has received over 8.4 million views, and triggered thousands of cookie orders for McCourt. Read more at: GoodNewNetwork.org
  3. Celiac.com 01/27/2017 - US retail sales of gluten-free products rose 11% in 2015, and are predicted to rise a more modest 6% to $1.66bn in 2016, according to a new report from Packaged Facts, which predicts that as the market matures, growth rates are "expected to slow considerably." To provide context, Packaged Facts notes that growth rates have slowed from 81% in 2013 and 30% in 2014 to 11% in 2015, and predicts they will settle at a steady 5-6% a year in the next five years. Unlike some other market research reports, which include everything with a gluten-free label in their market definitions, even those product that typically contain no gluten, Packaged Facts does not. The Packaged Facts reports are notable because they focus more closely on traditionally grain-based product categories: Salty Snacks, Crackers, Fresh Bread, Pasta, Cold (ready-to-eat) Cereal, Baking Mixes, Cookies, Flour, and Frozen Bread/Dough. They do not cover "naturally gluten-free foods," such as potato chips or ready-to-eat popcorn, and do not include things like gluten free frozen pizza, lasagna, stuffing mix or entrees The latest report notes that, while the market is maturing, it is still quite fragmented. Packaged Facts notes that only Hain Celestial and Pinnacle Foods have market shares exceeding 10%. Read more about the Packaged Facts report.
  4. Celiac.com 10/07/2016 - Sales of gluten-free products continue to rise, with global the market expected to approach $5 billion by 2021, up from $2.84 billion in 2014, according to a new report from Transparency Market Research. Analysts are projecting annual revenue growth of about 7.7% across the sector from 2015 to 2021. They also project that, by 2021, North America will become the fastest growing gluten-free market, though Europe still currently dominates with a 52.5% share. Rising consumer belief in the potential health benefits of gluten-free products is a main factor driving growth in the gluten-free market. That, together with more cases of celiac disease and/or gluten sensitivity, increased use of gluten-free products as a weight management tool. Also a major factor is the high demand for gluten-free bakery products, the largest category in the gluten-free market. The sharp growth in gluten-free foods continues, even as scientists question its effectiveness for people with out celiac disease. The fact that there is no evidence to support the idea that people without celiac disease gain any health benefits from gluten-free products, seems to have little impact, and so the trend continues apace. Never ones to miss major consumer trends, companies from PepsiCo Quaker to Snyder's-Lance to General Mills' cereal brands are working to offer gluten-free options. The move by manufacturers toward more gluten-free products is probably a wise one. Even though nearly half of consumers claim gluten-free food is a fad, nearly one-in-four consumers said they consumed gluten-free products last year, and the demand for gluten-free products shows no sign of slowing down.
  5. Celiac.com 01/21/2016 - With sales of non-gluten-free cereals enduring a slow, consistent downward slide in just about every category, gluten-free cereals have been one of the few bright spots for cereal manufacturers. In an effort to combat those falling cereal sales across its existing product line, manufacturer General Mills released five gluten-free Cheerios products. Initial results suggest that their plan is working, at least somewhat. According to General Mills, sales of non-discounted, full-price gluten-free varieties of Cheerios grew 3% to 4% last quarter, offering the fist improvement after multiple quarters of declining sales. This is particularly good news for General Mills, as it follows on the heels of an embarrassing recall of 1.8 million boxes of Cheerios and Honey Nut Cheerios in October, shortly after the introduction of their gluten-free varieties. The company chalked that issue up to "human error." So the fact that the latest numbers are strong so soon after a major product recall suggests that gluten-free Cheerios might just be the ticket for turning around their slumping sales. What do you think? Have you tried gluten-free Cheerios? Will you? Are you happy that major companies like General Mills are making gluten-free products available? Read more: buzzfeed.com
  6. Celiac.com 06/01/2012 - Even as gluten-free bread continue to rise, sales of traditional wheat-based bread are falling across the globe. According to Paul Hetherington, a 20 year veteran of the Baking Association of Canada, the plunge is driven by numerous factors, including recent dietary shifts away from wheat and toward gluten-free diets by people who are not adverse to gluten. One example, major Canadian baked goods manufacturer, Maple Leaf Foods Inc., recently reported first quarter adjusted earnings of just 11¢ per share, down from 18¢ last year, and well below the 16.8¢ predicted by analysts. Maple Leaf president and CEO, Michael McCain, says that the decline was due to a 73% drop in adjusted first quarter earnings by the company's Bakery Products Group, which fell from $12.2-million in 2011 to $3.3-million this year. McCain said that his company is experiencing a fate shared across the industry as “fundamental bread consumption is down.” Maple Leaf’s net earnings decreased to $800,000 compared with $10.5 million last year, as the company’s adjusted operated earnings dropped 20% to $40.5 million. To counter the trend, Maple Leaf plans marketing initiatives to grow sales and to focus on the health benefits of bread and target growth categories, such as English muffins and bagels, he said. The company also expects to benefit from lower commodity costs, including wheat, to improve margins later in the year. Source: http://business.financialpost.com/2012/05/02/bread-sales-take-a-beating-as-more-consumers-go-gluten-free/
  7. Celiac.com 05/04/2011 - Agriculture officials in Colorado looking to increase millet sales are turning to beer-brewers for help. At present, millet makes up just a fraction of the cereal grains sold in the U.S. Each year, America produces just $50 million worth of millet, compared to several billion dollars worth of wheat, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Millet represents an opportunity to increase revenue for rural Colorado businesses, according to Timothy Larsen, senior international marketing specialist for the state agriculture department. He adds that agriculture needs to nurture numerous niche markets in order to expand. Colorado produces about 60 percent of all millet produced in the U.S. production, about 200,000 acres of millet. The millet can be rotated with wheat, which grows on about 2 million acres. Commonly used as birdseed, Colorado agriculture officials have been promoting millet's gluten-free qualities, and working with Colorado State University to develop recipes using millet. Hoping to create an entirely new business sector officials are asking the Colorado Malting Co. to ship malted samples to Colorado-based brewers so they can experiment with millet-based beers. The company is currently preparing about 6,000 pounds of millet from the Fort Morgan area — 2,000 pounds each of three varieties — for commercial brewers this spring. The company recently finished malting golden German millet, which, according to co-owner Jason Cody, yielded some impressive nutty flavors. Pedro Gonzalez, co-founder of gluten-free beer company New Planet Beer, said he's eager to see if the brewers his company works with can find a recipe that appeals to customers the way some millet-based imports do. New Planet's existing beers primarily use sorghum, corn and brown rice, along with ingredients such as raspberry puree and molasses to add flavor. Because people's taste-buds are geared toward malted barley, and the gluten, and the proteins that make beer thick and full-bodied, working without barley can be a challenge. "When you choose not to have barley or wheat in your beer, then you lose those qualities, says Gonzalez." Being able to use Colorado-grown millet will help New Planet meet its company mission of being environmentally responsible by using ingredients that don't have to be shipped far, Gonzalez said. Among the establishments scheduled to participate in the millet-beer experiment are Eddyline Restaurant and Brewing Co., in Buena Vista, Pagosa Brewing Co. in Pagosa Springs. Eddyline head brewer Scott Kimball won't promise his customers a millet beer until he knows how it tastes. Pagosa Springs head brewer Tony Simmons says malted millet presents "an opportunity where if we have a gluten-free beer that actually tastes good, let's try it," adding that he's done some home-brewing with millet, and that he's "a big fan." The project is being made possible in part by a $42,000 USDA grant to help Colorado's millet industry market itself, domestically and overseas. Source: http://www.greenfieldreporter.com/view/story/c03f9954de0b4eaf8514c5eeb1dba418/CO--Colorado-Millet-Beer/
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