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Found 9 results

  1. Celiac.com 02/13/2018 - It is perhaps unsurprising that processed gluten-free foods are less nutritious than their gluten-containing counterparts. We've had data showing gluten-free foods to be high in sugar. We've had studies that show us they contain more salt. And now, for the trifecta, we have a recent study that shows us they contain more fat, sugar and salt. A study by the University of Hertfordshire surveyed more than 1,700 products from five UK supermarket chains and found that gluten-free foods have more fat, salt and sugar than their gluten-including counterparts, despite consumer perception that they "healthier" options. Except for crackers, every gluten-free food in the survey had more saturated fat, sugar and salt than non-gluten-free counterparts. On average for gluten-free brown bread and white bread had more than double the fat of regular breads. Gluten-free products also had significantly lower protein content than their gluten-containing equivalents, and were generally lower in ï¬ber and protein. Gluten-free products were also more likely to break the budget. On average, gluten-free products were also more than 1½ times more expensive than their counterparts, while gluten-free brown and white bread and gluten-free white and wholegrain flour sold at more than four times the price of comparable regular breads, on average. Overall, gluten-free foods are likely to be less nutritious and more expensive than their non-gluten-free counterparts. Basically, people on a gluten-free diet need to be extra careful about getting nutritious food. Simply substituting gluten-free versions of a a standard non-gluten-free diet likely means more fat, sugar and salt in your diet, along with less fiber. If you don't have a medically diagnosed reason for avoiding gluten, then be mindful about four food choices.
  2. Celiac.com 10/14/2017 - Filled with nuts and cranberries, these easy to cook baked apples are slow-cooker magic. Top them with sea salt caramel sauce and vanilla ice cream, and you’ve got the makings for a memorable treat. Ingredients: 4 tart baking apples, such as Granny Smith, medium sized ⅓ cup dried cranberries, chopped ⅓ cup finely chopped walnuts or pecans ⅓ cup packed brown sugar 1 cup apple cider 1 teaspoon lemon zest 2 tablespoons lemon juice 3 inches of stick cinnamon 1 tablespoon butter, cut into four pieces ⅓ cup packed brown sugar ¼ cup whipping cream ¼ cup butter 1 tablespoon light-color corn syrup 1 teaspoon vanilla ½ teaspoon coarse sea salt Vanilla ice cream, as desired Directions: Core apples, and peel the very top away from each apple. Arrange the apples, top side up, in a slow cooker. In a medium bowl, combine cranberries, walnuts and brown sugar. Spoon mixture into centers of apples, patting in with a knife or narrow metal spatula. Combine apple cider, lemon zest and lemon juice and pour around apples in cooker. Add stick cinnamon to liquid. Top each apple with a piece of butter. Cover and cook on low-heat setting for 5 hours. Sauce Directions: In a heavy small saucepan, bring the ⅓ cup brown sugar, whipping cream, butter and corn syrup to a light boil over medium-high heat, whisking occasionally; reduce heat to medium. Boil gently, uncovered, for 2 minutes more. Remove from heat. Stir in vanilla and sea salt. Cool to room temperature before serving. Transfer warm apples to dessert dishes. Top each apple with a bit of the cooking liquid. Serve with sea salt-caramel sauce and ice cream, as desired.
  3. Celiac.com 08/29/2017 - The popularity of gluten-free products has soared, despite little evidence that gluten-free products are beneficial for people who do not have celiac disease. The number and range of gluten-free products continue to grow at a rapid pace, and manufacturers are adding more all the time. The proliferation of gluten-free products is inviting the scrutiny of nutritionists, some of whom are arraigning the alarm about questionable nutrition of many gluten-free foods and snacks. Recent products tests show that the vast majority of gluten-free snacks tested are far saltier than their non-gluten-free alternatives, say researchers. Just how much saltier? Researchers surveyed a total of 106 products, and found that many gluten-free snacks have up to five times more salt than non-gluten-free counterparts. And only a third of these products have proper warnings on their labels, according to a separate study by health campaigners. The team also compared salt content for each product in a particular category to the salt content (per 100g) of a randomly chosen gluten-containing equivalent product of that category. Notable differences in salt content include: Schar Gluten Free Pretzels (3.0/100g), twice the salt of Sainsbury's Salted Pretzels (1.5g/100g) Mrs Crimble's Original Cheese Crackers (3.5/100g), 2.5 times the salt of Ritz Original Crackers (1.38/100g) The Snack Organisation Sweet Chilli Rice Crackers (2.6/100g), 3 times as salty as Aldi's The Foodie Market Crunchy Chilli Rice Snacks (0.84/100g) These revelations invite questions about whether health-conscious shoppers are being misled. Nutritionists are urging shoppers to look past clever packaging, and to not automatically assume that "gluten-free" foods are healthy. Full Survey Data: Actiononsalt.org
  4. Did you know that Milton's Craft Bakers makes an outstanding line of gluten-free chips and crackers? I didn't, but was recently lucky enough to get to try out their Gluten-Free Himalayan Salt Baked Chips and their Gluten-Free Crispy Sea Salt Crackers. What really stood out about each of these wonderful gluten-free snacks was their lightness—since both are perfectly baked instead of fried, they tasted light, healthy, and very crunchy. The Crispy Sea Salt Crackers were perfect for dipping. I tried them with a jalapeno and artichoke dip, and they were wonderful, and I also had them with a sharp cheddar cheese on top. They seem to go great with everything, and are made with multiple grains including millet, brown rice, gluten-free oats, and corn. Likewise, the Himalayan Salt Baked Chips were similarly versatile, and were far lighter tasting than regular tortilla chips. Besides being gluten-free, the chips are also free of dairy, nut, soy, and eggs, and are made with corn, brown rice, lentils, and chick peas. Both snacks are non-GMO, Kosher, and don't contain any cholesterol. These outstanding snacks are a perfect addition to any party or event, or just to have as a snack on your own. They are gluten-free, but those who are not on a gluten-free diet will never notice this. Milton's Craft Bakers has done a great job making these wholesome, gluten-free snacks. Visit their site for more info.
  5. What type of salt is best to use for healthy nutrition in general and esp. in case of food intolerances? So far I bought the regular table salt (and assumed it is safe...) but now I saw that some of the brands have nasty additives in it. Sigh, even in salt??!!
  6. I get some swelling in my right knee and left elbow, it amuses me that it's opposite sides like that, but it is actually fairly sore on the elbow =/ this is a newer reaction, I've always reacted poorly to salt but only with skin/scalp never a legit join inflammation, it may not have been the salt I was just wondering if anyone HAD this particular reaction or something similar from salt.
  7. I was sad to read on the label of the Trader Joe's Pink Himalayan Salt grinder that it is processed on a machine that processes wheat. :-( I guess I now have to read the label on things that should be a no brainer. Ugh! Newbie
  8. Hey everyone, I just noticed on my Publix Iodized salt one of the ingredients is dextrose. Does anyone know if this is related to gluten? If not where does it come from?
  9. Hello again, I was just wondering if anyone else had bad probelms with too much salt or fat? I ask because yesterday i ate a whole bag of salted/roasted macadamia nuts, its not a big bag but enough. I do eat them occasionally but not a whole bag. So i woke up this morning with agonising cramps in my lower stomach and the inevitable happened, really loose stool, like mud, not watery, and had to go to relieve myself a few times before the cramping died down, i also took a paracetamol because it hurt so much, i rarely, rarely do this. I think cramps are a natural thing but this morning was too much. I also had rice last night which if anything usually binds me up, but i've been reading more and more about how rice can adversly effect some people when they have too much. But i don't think i have as i havent had it for quite a few days now. So I'm wondering if people on here if they have to much salt/fat do you get these types of symptoms and does it make sense? If so I'l stay away from the amcadamias no matter how delicious they are. Thanks in advance.
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