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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/18/2019 - Autoimmune conditions cause the body to attack its own healthy cells. There are nearly one-hundred known autoimmune conditions, including lupus, celiac disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. Diagnosing autoimmune conditions can sometimes be difficult, so any progress toward faster, cheaper, or more reliable testing methods could play a significant role in improving diagnosis and reducing time to treatment. Approval by the FDA is key to making such tests available commercially. A New York startup company, Aesku.NY, has received FDA approval for tests to detect two of those autoimmune diseases, with tests for other diseases expected to follow. The approved tests for celiac disease, and the connective tissue disorder, lupus, would still require patients who screen positive to receive further testing for a specific diagnosis. However, the tests are designed to be cost effective, and efficient, potentially increasing the availability of a reliable screening method for diseases that are best caught and treated early. "In many autoimmune diseases, if you don't have a good test, it takes many years to pinpoint a diagnosis," says company founder Dr. Vijay Kumar. "Again, coming back to celiac disease, it used to be 3-5 years before a diagnosis is made," he added, "[t]hink about how many physicians, clinicians, laboratories, the patient might have gone through." Aesku.NY tests are produced domestically, in Buffalo New York. Stay tuned for more news on developments in celiac disease diagnostics, and related topics. Listen to WBFO's Mike Desmond
  2. Celiac.com 02/06/2017 - People with celiac disease have higher rates of autoimmune thyroiditis, and vice versa. Both of these common autoimmune diseases share multiple aspects lodging at the two ends of the gut-thyroid axis where the cross-talks' pathways are still unrivaled. A team of researchers recently set out to better understand the parameters for effectively screening patients with either disease for the presence of the other. The research team included Aaron Lerner, and Torsten Matthias of the Rappaport School of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, and with AESKU.KIPP Institute, Wendelsheim, Germany. Many clinicians recommend screening patients with thyroid autoimmunity for celiac disease associated antibodies. However, the wisdom of routinely screening of celiac patients for anti-thyroid antibodies is less certain. Despite the fact that the latter screening fulfills most of the criteria for screening a disease, the timing and cost-effectiveness remains undetermined. For now, in face of celiac disease, the researchers are recommending that clinicians and practitioners keep in mind the higher rates of autoimmune thyroid disease in the interests of making timely and accurate diagnosis. Read their full report. Source: International Journal of Celiac Disease. Vol. 4, No. 4, 2016, pp 124-126. doi: 10.12691/ijcd-4-4-10
  3. Celiac.com 12/15/2016 - Celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can have similar symptoms, and confusion between the two can often cause delays in diagnosis. International guidelines recommend screening IBS patients for celiac disease using serological testing. However, studies published recently have cast doubt on the utility of this. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the use of serological testing to screen IBS patients for celiac disease, and to update a previous meta-analysis of this issue. The research team included Andrew J Irvine, William D Chey and Alexander C Ford. They searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and EMBASE Classic through May 2016, looking for studies that had recruited adults with IBS according to symptom-based criteria, physician's opinion, or questionnaire data. Tests for celiac disease included IgA-class antigliadin antibodies (AGA), endomysial antibodies (EMA), tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTG), or duodenal biopsies following positive serology. They combined the proportion of individuals meeting criteria for IBS, and testing positive for celiac disease, to give a pooled prevalence for all studies, and they then compared between cases with IBS and, where reported, healthy controls without IBS, using an odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI). They found a total of thirty-six eligible studies, and 15,256 participants, nearly sixty-one percent of whom met criteria for IBS. Pooled ORs for positive IgA AGAs, EMA and/or tTG, and biopsy-proven celiac disease in IBS subjects vs. controls were 3.21 (95% CI 1.55–6.65), 2.75 (95% CI 1.35–5.61), and 4.48 (95% CI 2.33–8.60), respectively. The authors wrote that there was "no increase in ORs for any test for celiac disease among cases with IBS in North American studies, and results were inconsistent in population-based studies." Rates of biopsy-proven celiac disease were substantially higher across all subtypes of IBS. Their review had a few limitations, including heterogeneity in some analyses, along with limited North American study data. Overall, people with symptoms suggestive of IBS had higher rates of positive celiac serology and biopsy-proven celiac disease than did healthy control subjects. However, the case for celiac disease screening for individuals with suspected IBS in North America is still unclear. Essentially, we need broader and more comprehensive study of this issue in North America. Source: The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 18 October 2016. doi:10.1038/ajg.2016.466
  4. Hi Gang, I am new here. I am a 24YOM with no pertinent medical history who just had a positive celiac screen on a gluten free diet. I can not get in to see the GI specialist for 6 weeks. What should I eat between now and then? Back story: Last October I did my first "Whole 30." The Whole 30 is an elimination diet where you do not eat added sugar, alcohol, grains, legumes, or dairy for 30 days then you reintroduce each group one at a time to see how it may effect you. I got to day 23 then my dad died. I had all of the above (and more) in the ensuing days and did not get to properly reintroduce anything. So, I wanted to do another proper Whole 30 and am now on day 24 of 30. Last day is next Monday. Ever since my first Whole 30, I have not pooped right at all. I've consistently had lots of cramping, diarrhea, constipation, etc. I've been suspecting either lactose or a gluten sensitivity, so I figured a new Whole 30 would help me figure it out. Mentioned the above to my new PCP at my yearly physical last week and she did a celiac blood test. She told me today that it was "positive for serological markers for celiac" and something about GPDs, and referred me to a GI specialist. 1) My first question to you guys is, what should my diet be from next Tuesday until the end of March? From some reading, it seems that I should go back to eating gluten...is that true?!? and that I may get pretty sick next week when I reintroduce it...? 2) What can I expect at that first GI specialist appointment--in 6 weeks? I am very dedicated to diet/health (so, I can hold my own in sticking to whatever diet you say I should) but do I need to be more pushy and get that appointment moved up? Just to better help me get educated, if you have any sources for your information, I would greatly appreciate it. Technical journal articles are fine. For the record, I do have 5 immediate family members with moderate-serious autoimmune illnesses and some do have UC and diverticulosis. Thanks all! Purdue
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