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Found 6 results

  1. Celiac.com 09/09/2016 - Celiac disease incidence has increased in recent decades. How much do sex, age at diagnosis, year of birth, month of birth and region of birth have to do with celiac disease risk? A team of researchers recently conducted a nationwide prospective cohort longitudinal study to examine the association between celiac disease diagnosis and season of birth, region of birth and year of birth. The research team included Fredinah Namatovu, Marie Lindkvist, Cecilia Olsson, Anneli Ivarsson, and Olof Sandström. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Food and Nutrition, the Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, and the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health at Umeå University in Umeå, Sweden. Their study included 1,912,204 children aged 0–14.9 years born in Sweden from 1991 to 2009. They found a total of 6,569 children diagnosed with biopsy-verified celiac disease from 47 pediatric departments. The team used Cox regression to examine the association between celiac disease diagnosis and season of birth, region of birth and year of birth. They found that children born during spring, summer and autumn had higher celiac disease risk, as compared with children born during winter: adjusted HR for spring 1.08 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.16), summer 1.10 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.18) and autumn 1.10 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.18). Increased celiac disease risk was highest for children born in the south, followed by central Sweden, as compared with children born in northern Sweden. The birth cohort of 1991–1996 had increased celiac disease risk if born during spring, for the 1997–2002 birth cohort the risk increased for summer and autumn births, while for the birth cohort of 2003–2009 the risk was increased if born during autumn. Both independently and together, season of birth and region of birth are associated with increased risk of developing celiac disease during the first 15 years of life. These seasonal differences in risk levels are likely due to seasonal variation in infectious disease exposure. Source: Arch Dis Child. doi:10.1136/archdischild-2015-310122
  2. Celiac.com 11/19/2014 - Whoever your favorite team may be, a great dip can really anchor the snack table at a party or gathering. In this dip, fresh dill, yogurt and mayonnaise come together with a bit of sugar and some seasoned salt to deliver a dip that goes great with vegetables and chips. Ingredients: 2 cups mayonnaise 2 cups whole milk yogurt 3 tablespoons minced onion 1 teaspoon seasoned salt (recipe below) 3 teaspoons fresh dill weed 1½-2 teaspoons white sugar, to taste Directions: In a medium bowl, mix mayonnaise, yogurt, minced onion, seasoning salt, dill, and sugar. Refrigerate for at least 8 hours before serving to blend flavors. Seasoned Salt: 2 tablespoons salt 2 teaspoons sugar ½ teaspoon paprika ⅓ teaspoon turmeric ⅓ teaspoon onion powder ⅓ teaspoon garlic powder ⅓ teaspoon cornstarch Mix in a bowl and put into a jar or shaker and use as needed.
  3. Celiac.com 02/20/2013 - Scientific evidence indicates that the risk of developing celiac disease cannot be explained solely by genetic factors. There is some evidence to support the idea that the season in which a child is born can influence the risk for developing celiac disease. It is known that babies born in summer months are likely to be weaned and introduced to gluten during winter, when viral infections are more frequent. A number of studies indicate that early viral infections can increase risk levels for celiac disease, however, earlier studies on birth season and celiac disease have been small, and their results have been contradictory. To better answer the question, a research team recently set out to conduct a more thorough study of the relationship between birth month and celiac disease. The research team included B. Lebwohl, P.H. Green, J.A. Murray, and J.F. Ludvigsson. The study was conducted through the Department of Paediatrics at Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden. To conduct the study, the team used biopsy reports from all 28 Swedish pathology departments to identify individuals with celiac disease, which they defined as small intestinal villous atrophy (n=29 096). Using the government agency Statistics Sweden the team identified 144,522 control subjects, who they matched for gender, age, calendar year and county. The team then used conditional logistic regression to examined the association between summer birth (March-August) and later celiac disease diagnosis (outcome measure). They found that 54.10% of people with celiac disease were born in the summer months compared with 52.75% of control subjects. So, being born in the summer is associated with a slightly higher risk of later celiac disease (OR 1.06; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.08; p). While summer birth was not associated with a higher rates of celiac diagnosis in later childhood (age 2-18 years: OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.97 to 1.08), it did show a slightly higher risk of developing celiac disease in adulthood (age ≥18 years: OR 1.04; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.07). In this study, the data show that people born during the summer months had a slightly higher risk of developing celiac disease, but that excess risk was small, and general infectious disease exposure early in life were not likely to increase that risk. Source: Arch Dis Child. 2013 Jan;98(1):48-51. doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2012-302360.
  4. Celiac.com 11/16/2012 - Many of the increasing number of folks who suffer from celiac disease and/or gluten-intolerance also happen to love beer. So, what to do? For those who are loathe to give up on one of their favorite beverages, there are a number of delicious, gluten-free alternatives that will help to keep the smiles coming. For those who prefer cider over beer, we've also included a list of some mighty tasty, gluten-free ciders to warm you on the dark nights ahead. Here is a partial list of gluten-free beers and ciders that will take even the most discerning gluten-free beer drinker through the holiday season and beyond: Gluten-free Beers Harvester Brewing Dark Ale Harvester Brewing is a dedicated gluten-free brewery founded by James Neumeister in 2011, after his wife was diagnosed with celiac disease. Harvester's website says that every beer that they make is gluten-free, and "made in our brewery where no gluten containing items are allowed through the door." In place of wheat and/or barley, Neumeister uses chestnuts, which he roasts and brews specifically for each product Harvester makes. Harvester's Dark Ale uses a very dark, near espresso-like, roasted chestnuts, which yields a brew that has hints of chocolate, coffee, dark fruits, and a rich chestnut finish. Brunehaut Bio Amber Brunehaut's hefty, certified-organic amber ale uses de-glutenized barley to produce a rich, copper colored brew with a beige head, and notes of caramel and fresh bread with hoppy accents of pine and citrus, along with hints of vanilla, toffee, butterscotch and ripe fruit. Alcohol is 6.5% by volume. Estrella Damm Daura In 2011, Estrella Damm's gluten-free Daura fended off entries from all over the globe to win Gold Medals at the World Beer Championships and the International Beer Challenge, and won the World’s Best Gluten-free Lager Award at the World Beer Awards. Gluten-free beer drinkers consistently report that Daura is one of the best beers they have tasted. The beer has limited distribution in the US, and, for many gluten-free beer drinkers, finding it can be like finding the Holy Chalice. Here's a handy link to help you find Estrella Damm Daura in your area. Green’s Quest Gluten Free Tripel Blonde Ale For those who prefer Trappist style ales, but can't have the traditional malted barley, the folks at Green's use millet, sorghum, buckwheat, and rice, to brew a refermented tripel blonde ale that offers an herby, yeasty aroma, with hints of pear and apple, spice, and flavors of candied fruit. Alcohol is 8.5% by volume. Green's Endeavour Dubbel Ale Green's Endeavour is brewed in the classic dubbel fashion. The result is a brew that offers hints of dark-sugar and toffee flavor with a traditional Belgian yeast bouquet. Alcohol is 7.0% by volume. Green’s Discovery Amber Ale Green’s Discovery is a medium-bodied amber ale with subtle caramel and nut flavors, and a refined, herbal hop bouquet and finish. Alcohol is 6.0% by volume. Since 2004, Green's beers have been brewed in Lochristi, Belgium at the highly-regarded DeProef Brewery. Inspired by tasty, full-bodied European beers and developed to a closely guarded secret recipe, these strong beers offer a crisp taste and a refreshing flavor, while eliminating allergens. Because they are bottle-conditioned with genuine Belgian yeast, all of Green's Beers have a full five-year shelf life. According to Green's website, the characteristic tastes and aromas of their beers result from the specially selected de-glutenised barley malt and hop varieties and are brewed to age old recipes. New Planet Tread Lightly Ale For their gluten-free Tread Lightly Ale, New Planet uses sorghum, corn extract, orange peel, hops, and yeast to brew a refreshing, light bodied beer without the aftertaste of many sorghum-based beers. New Planet Off Grid Pale Ale For their Gluten-free Off Grid Pale Ale, New Planet uses sorghum and brown rice extract, molasses, tapioca maltodextrin, caramel color, hops, and yeast to produce a classically styled pale ale with a distinctly deep amber color and great character and body. Three varieties of hops impart a delightful citrus aroma and a spicy hop flavor. Omission Gluten-Free Lager, Omission uses aromatic hops to brew a refreshing and crisp beer in the traditional lager style. Alcohol is 4.6% by volume. Omission Gluten-Free Pale AleBold and hoppy, Omission Pale Ale is a hop-forward American Pale Ale, brewed to showcase the Cascade hop profile. Amber in color, Omission Pale Ale’s floral aroma is complimented by caramel malt body. Alcohol is 5.8% by volume. Their website states that, before shipping, Omission tests gluten levels in every batch both at the brewery, and at an independent lab, using the R5 Competitive ELISA gluten test, to ensure that the beers measure well below the Codex gluten-free standard of 20 ppm or less. Sprecher Shakparo Ale Sprecher's gluten free Shakparo Ale is a West African Shakparo-style beer brewed from sorghum and millet. An unfiltered, light, crisp ale with a cider or fruit highlights and a dry aftertaste. For the more adventurous, Sprecher also brews Mbege Ale, which is an unfiltered ale brewed with bananas, yes, bananas, in the African style. Light hints of banana remain present in the aroma and flavor of this unique offering. Steadfast Sorghum Pale Ale Steadfast brewery uses Cascade-and Columbus hops and White sorghum syrup and molasses to brew their golden amber, Indian/American-style Steadfast Sorghum Pale Ale. Alcohol is 6.8% by volume. Gluten-free Ciders Crispin Browns Lane Browns Lane by Crispin is a lightly sparking, crisply effervescent cider made with traditional English bittersweet cider apples sourced in the Malvern Hills of Worcestershire. The result is a rich cider with a dark straw color, and an aroma that evokes an almost traditional farmhouse cider bouquet. Soft, subtle natural apple sweetness up front, with a slightly dry, woody, lingering finish. Crispin Original Cider Crispin Super Premium Hard Apple Cider is naturally fermented using fresh pressed apple-juice, not apple-juice concentrate, from a premium blend of US West Coast apples, with no added malt, grape-wine, or spirit alcohol. The crisp flavor of Crispin is polished with pure apple juice, with no added sugar, colorants or sorbate or benzoate preservatives and cold filtered for crisp refreshment. Strongbow Cider Strongbow uses a traditional English recipe to brew a crisp, refreshing premium cider. Magners Cider Magners uses 17 varieties of apples and ferments their cider up to two years to deliver a full-bodied, well-rounded traditional cider.
  5. Celiac.com 06/10/2011 - Children born in the spring or summer seem to have higher rates of celiac disease, according to a study of Massachusetts children. This higher rate could be tied to certain seasonal and environmental factors, according to researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital for Children. Potential triggers for celiac disease seem to include the timing of infants' introduction to gluten and of viral infections during the first year of life. The research team hypothesized that the season of a child's birth might influence rates of celiac disease, since babies commonly receive their first foods with gluten at about six months of age, which for children born in spring or summer would mean the beginning of the winter cold season. The research team assessed 382 patients with biopsy-confirmed celiac disease, whose age at diagnosis ranged from 11 months to 19 years. Among older children (ages 15 to 19), there was virtually no difference in birth season (categorized as light, meaning March to August, or dark, defining September to February). But the group of 317 children under 15 years old showed an significant difference. As a group, 57 percent had been born in a light season, whereas 43 percent were born during a dark season. Given the prevalence of celiac disease in children, the study carries potential importance for families and doctors. Lead researcher and clinical research fellow, Pornthep Tanpowpong, MD, MPH, said the findings might invite researchers health care professionals to rethink their recommended time frame for introducing a children to cereals and other foods that contain gluten. He adds that other potential causative season-of-birth factors, such as sunlight exposure and vitamin D status, also deserve investigation. For people born in the spring or the summer, it might be more appropriate to introduce gluten at a different point than someone born in the fall or winter, said Dr. Tanpowpong. "Although we need to further develop and test our hypothesis, we think it provides a helpful clue for ongoing efforts to prevent celiac disease." Source: EurekAlert
  6. Celiac.com 10/25/2008 - With a bit of planning and knowledge anyone with celiac disease can enjoy a safe, gluten-free Thanksgiving and holiday season without the concern of accidental gluten ingestion. If you plan to prepare your own gluten-free turkey dinner, here are some ideas that may be helpful: A gluten-free holiday dinner starts with a gluten-free turkey. Believe it or not some brands of turkey do contain additives that are not gluten-free—so, like everything else, read the ingredients and use our Gluten-Free Ingredient Lists or our Gluten-Free Shopping Guides to help you shop. Don’t risk gluten-based stuffing in your turkey. Instead, try my favorite gluten-free stuffing recipe. Gravy is easy: Use a gluten-free gravy mix, or a gluten-free gravy recipe. Remember, bouillon cubes can often be a source of hidden gluten in holiday meals so be sure to use gluten-free bouillon cubes. To thicken your homemade gravy you can use corn starch or arrowroot flour. Gluten-free holiday side dishes are easy: Browse our extensive listing of gluten-free recipes to find side dishes that will impress anyone—celiac disease or not. Order gluten-free baking ingredients and other hard-to-find items like prepared gluten-free pies ahead of time for convenience—this will allow you to spend more time with friends and family rather than spending all of your time in the kitchen! Many excellent prepared gluten-free products can now be ordered and delivered directly to your door from places like the Gluten-Free Mall. If you plan to eat out, or at a relative’s or friend’s house during the holidays, you might find this information helpful: Ali Demeritte's blog entry: The Dinner Party Drama—Two Guidelines to Assure a Pleasant Gluten-Free Experience. Danna Korn's article: Venturing Out of the House: Restaurant Realities. Aimee Eiguren's blog entry: Eating Out Gluten-Free and Without Fear. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free at Restaurants. Chef Daniel Moran's article: Traveling and Eating Gluten-Free Meals at Small or Moving Restaurants. The holiday season can stressful enough without having to worry about gluten in your meals. Hopefully the tips in this article will help you eliminate this concern, and allow you to have a safe and relaxed gluten-free holiday!
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