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Found 4 results

  1. The other day I was thinking about some of the things that I miss most since going gluten-free. Most of them involve the loss of the sense of freedom that I remember having while eating out or shopping. For many years after my diagnosis something as simple as being able to buy a frozen pizza at a supermarket was just not possible. My how things have changed over the last few years! Now it is not only possible to buy frozen pizzas again, but it is also possible to buy truly outstanding frozen gluten-free pizzas, like Freschetta's new Gluten Free Signature Pepperoni Pizza. Preparation of the Freschetta Gluten Free Signature Pepperoni Pizza is simple, just remove the packaging and bake it on a pan in a pre-heated oven at 450F for 12-16 minutes. I baked mine on the longer side, as I like the mozzarella cheese to be light brown and bubbling. The first thing I noticed about this pizza is that the crust is thin, which I like, and it gets brown easily, which is not always the case with gluten-free pizzas. The second thing I noticed was the wonderful smell coming from the oven—it smelled like I was at a pizzeria. After removing it from the oven and letting it cool for a couple of minutes, I cut it and noticed that my family could not wait to try it. The taste was amazing! This pizza offers a generous amount of mozzarella cheese and perfectly flavored sauce—and I love the light, crispy and chewy crust (yes, to me great pizza is all about the consistency of the crust!). My whole family really loved this pizza, and it should be noted that neither of my kids nor my wife need to be gluten-free, yet each of them thought that this pizza was great! For more info visit: www.freschetta.com Review written by Scott Adams.
  2. How do we change our signature information? Mine is old & out of date & needs to be updated. Thanks
  3. Celiac.com 06/25/2010 - Recent scientific evidence suggests that gut microbiota may play a significant role in celiac disease. To further examine the role of gut microbiota in celiac disease, an Italian research team conducted a study of children with celiac disease. The research team included Serena Schippa, Valerio Iebba, Maria Barbato, Giovanni di Nardo,Valentina Totino, Monica Proietti Checchi, Catia Longhi, Giulia Maiella, Salvatore Cucchiara, Maria Pia Conte. To gain a better understanding of any role played by dominant duodenal microbiota, the team analyzed the mucosa-associated microbiota of 20 children with celiac disease, both before and after treatment with a gluten-free diet. The compared the results with a group of 10 control subjects. The team extracted total DNA from duodenal biopsies and amplification products of 16S ribosomal DNA. They then compared the results using temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE). They assessed TTGE profiles by statistical multivariate analysis. They found that, on average, patients with active celiac disease showed a significantly higher number of bands in TTGE profiles (P<0.0001) (n.b. 16.7 +/- 0.7), compared to patients with treated, or inactive disease (n.b. 13.2 +/- 0.8) compared to control subjects (n.b. 3.7 +/- 1.3). Average inter-individual similarity indices were 54.9% +/- 14.9% for active disease patients, 55.6% +/- 15.7% for treated (inactive) celiac disease, and 21.8% +/- 30.16% for controls. Similarity index between celiac children before and after treatment with gluten-free diet was 63.9% +/- 15.8%. Variation in microbiota biodiversity between active and remission state was P=0.000224. Between active celiac disease and control subjects, variation was P<0.001. Patients with celiac disease showed higher populations of Bacteroides vulgatus and Escherichia coli, compared to control subjects (P<0.0001). Overall, the results demonstrate a peculiar microbial TTGE array, coupled with substantially greater biodiversity of duodenal mucosa in children with celiac disease. Further study is needed to assess any possible pathophysiological role for these microbial differences. Source: BMC Microbiology 2010, 10:175
  4. Celiac.com 12/23/2008 - Metabolites are small–molecule products of biochemical processes in the body’s cells. Analysis of these metabolites can detect changes in the body caused by chemical toxicity, disease, gene mutations, or diet. Bacteria in the gut also contribute to this “metabolic signature”, so it is also a way to understand changes in gut microbe populations. Because metabolites are excreted from the cells into blood and urine, collecting these samples can be easy, noninvasive, and inexpensive. Chemical techniques like nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are used to analyze the samples. The results of NMR spectroscopy are chemical patterns, showing the simultaneous alterations of many compounds. The measurement and analysis of multiple metabolite changes in response to genetic changes or environmental stimuli is known as metabonomics. Metabonomics has a number of potential applications. Ease of sample collection may enable researchers to develop a rapid screening tool for diseases like celiac disease. Using metabonomics, it is not necessary to know the specific metabolites that differ in people with a given disease (the disease biomarkers). Rather than looking for the presence or absence of a particular biomarker, the overall pattern of metabolite concentrations is compared to patterns of people known to have the disease (the metabolic signature of the disease) and patterns of people who do not have the disease. Large numbers of metabolites are analyzed simultaneously, instead of one by one, providing a snapshot into what is happening in the cells at a given time. In this first study to investigate the metabonomic signature of celiac disease, blood and urine samples of 34 people with celiac disease were analyzed at the time of diagnosis, which was based on antibody tests and confirmed with biopsies of the small intestine. These patterns were compared to the metabolite patterns of 34 people without celiac disease. Using blood samples, researchers were able to predict celiac disease up to 83% of the time. Analysis of urine samples gave accuracy of about 70%. These accuracy rates are lower than those achieved with antibody tests, but this is only the first small study and refining the techniques may significantly improve accuracy rates.In addition, analyzing the metabolic signature may lead to a greater understanding of celiac disease and the cause of its various symptoms. For example, results from this study included lower levels of some metabolites such as pyruvate (a product of glucose breakdown) coupled with elevated levels of other metabolites such as glucose and 3-hydroxybutyric acid (a by-product of fat breakdown) in people with celiac disease. These results suggest a possible explanation for chronic fatigue experienced by up to 87% of patients with celiac disease—a possible impairment in the body’s ability to use glucose for energy. As expected, evidence of altered gut bacteria was also found, as were an increase in metabolites that indicate an increased intestinal permeability (“leaky gut”). After 12 months of a strict gluten-free diet, these altered metabolite patterns reverted to normal. Metabonomics is an emerging field of study, which like genomics, holds great promise in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases like celiac disease. Reference: Bertini I, et al. The metabonomic signature of celiac disease. Journal of Proteome Research. 2008 Dec 11 [Epub ahead of print]
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