Jump to content
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'skin'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Calendars

  • Gluten-Free Community Calendar

Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Spring 2019 Issue
    • Winter 2019 Issue
    • Autumn 2018 Issue
    • Summer 2018 Issue
    • Spring 2018 Issue
    • Winter 2018 Issue
    • Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Summer 2017 Issue
    • Spring 2017 Issue
    • Winter 2017 Issue
    • Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Summer 2016 Issue
    • Spring 2016 Issue
    • Winter 2016 Issue
    • Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Summer 2015 Issue
    • Spring 2015 Issue
    • Winter 2015 Issue
    • Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Summer 2014 Issue
    • Spring 2014 Issue
    • Winter 2014 Issue
    • Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Summer 2013 Issue
    • Spring 2013 Issue
    • Winter 2013 Issue
    • Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Summer 2012 Issue
    • Spring 2012 Issue
    • Winter 2012 Issue
    • Autumn 2011 Issue
    • Summer 2011 Issue
    • Spring 2011 Issue
    • Spring 2006 Issue
    • Summer 2005 Issue
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location


First Name


Last Name


City


State


Country


How did you hear about us?

Found 14 results

  1. My 7-year-old has been complaining of constant itchiness and a skin crawling sensation for the past five months, but has no external rash or symptoms. It seems to get worse at night, although that may be because it's more difficult to distract herself at bedtime. We've tried switching shampoos and detergents, tepid baking soda baths followed by gluten-free lotion, re-reading the labels on anything that comes in contact with her skin, having her re-tested for more food sensitivities, and even checking the house for mold and cleaning all the air ducts. Nothing has helped. Her pediatrician referred us to an allergist who had us try several different histamine blockers, but not even Benadryl brings relief, so it doesn't appear to be a histamine issue. Blood tests show that her kidneys, liver and thyroid are all functioning normally. Right now I'm trying having her go nitrate-free since that isn't included in food sensitivity tests, but so far no improvement. Now they want to refer her to a dermatologist, but the appointment is a month away and she is MISERABLE. I have no idea how to help her.
  2. I was diagnosed w/ celiacs a year and a half ago. I have so many symptoms possibly related to other autoimmune diseases and other possible medical issues. That it has been so hard for me to recognize that they are most likely related to my celiac's disease. 10 months ago I started having skin issues. First it was dry itchy skin. Figured related to my thyroid. They I started breaking out on my face. I thought "I have acne for the first time in my life?". They a small skin lession under my breast. I it was a burn scar from hot oil. 7 months ago my skin issues on my face started spreading and getting worse. My PCP diagnosed me with eczema. Treated me with hydrocortison. 4 months ago my skin issues got worse. Darkening of skin areas affected. Dry flaking skin. Very sore and itchy. 2 months ago my PCP gave me triamcinolone to treat eczema. Within 2 days my skin issues were gone. Only this cream is very strong and you can not use it for more than 7 days, or it will thin your skin. I stopped it after 7 days, and within 24 hours my rash that looked like acne started coming back. The next day I noticed my neck was hot and itchy. Looked it the mirror, and it was red and swollen. Looked like hives. Took a benedryl, and it went away. Yesterday, my PCP told me Dermatitis Herpetiformis, or Duhring's Disease might be causing this. This is caused by an abnormal immune system response to gluten. Diagnosed by having a skin biopsy. Treated with Dapsone, an antibiotic, and gluten free diet. My symptoms are not exactly as I have read about, and pictures my doctor showed me are a little different. Also, I have been using coconut oil to treat dry itchy skin. If allergic to it, it can cause contact dermatitis. I guess this is also a possibility. Has anyone else had Dematitis Herpetiformis? If so, what were your symptoms? What helped? Did you have a biopsy? How long did it take to go away? Did it come back?
  3. I have been suffering with various symptoms for about 9 months and have recently decided to try a gluten-free diet. My symptoms have been: constant bloating (i used to have quite a flat stomach but I now look about 5 months pregnant, morning, noon and night!), rapid weight gain with no change in diet and despite diet and exercise I cannot shift any of it (I went up from 123lbs to 142lbs in 9 months), stomach/digestive pain, night sweats, headaches and muscle aches (particularly in my right arm and shoulder), irritability, low testosterone (according to my GP) and acid reflux. I have been to the doctor and had various tests and I don't have PCOS or a thyroid problem. I have been gluten-free for 5 days now and this weird prickling sensation has started happening in patches on my skin. There is no rash or redness that I can see. The other day it was mainly on my lower back, but now it seems to be principally on my ankles/lower calf area and forearms. I know that there is something called peripheral neuropathy that is a symptom of being gluten intolerant, but it seems weird to get this after going gluten free?? I do think I am starting to feel better from going gluten free but part of me wonders whether it is my imagination because I am so desperate to find an answer to all my symptoms. Although last night was the first night in a long time where I didnt wake up clamy from nightsweats, which I guess is a positive.
  4. Celiac.com 01/12/2018 - As an American, I almost never get excited about British royalty, or soon-to-be royalty. Chatter about William and Kate? Yawn. Charles and Camilla? Double yawn. Royal babies? Pshaw. I'd rather watch paint dry. However, one soon-to-be royal has just jumped into our gluten-free celebrity of the month pool, and so a brief story can't be helped. Much of the celebrity-gawking world might be unabashedly obsessed with Meghan Markle right now, and that makes her claims about ditching gluten newsworthy. In a recent interview with Delish, the 36-year-old Markel said that cutting gluten from her diet resulted in major improvements in her skin and energy levels. Now, there are health experts who claim that at least cutting back on gluten consumption can improve gut health, which plays a role in skin health. And there's plenty of evidence to show that, for people who are sensitive to gluten, eliminating gluten from the diet can reduce gut inflammation and improve symptoms that may affect skin and other organs. However, for people without celiac disease, there's no good research to support claims of any direct link between cutting gluten and improvements in gut and skin health. So, should you ditch gluten to get better skin? If you have genuine gluten sensitivity, then yes, by all means, ditching gluten will likely be helpful. If you don't have a gluten sensitivity, then ditching gluten is unlikely to have any major benefits, at least, that's what the science says.
  5. Celiac.com 12/21/2017 - After a lot of trial and error we celiacs learn, often the hard way, to eliminate foods that are poisonous to our bodies. Sadly, we often forget about what "goes onto" our skin. Since the skin is the living outer layer of our bodies it absorbs not only water and oils, it also absorbs cosmetics that can be poisonous to our celiac bodies, most specifically those of us afflicted with dermatitis herpetiformis (often called celiac disease of the Skin). Men, before you set this article aside, thinking it's only for women and you are exempt, please read on. One of 133 Americans has a wheat-related allergy according to CNN.com. We have a tendency not to group toothpaste and lip-glosses with cosmetics, and we usually ignore vitamins and medications when researching celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis. We forget to ask our hairdresser what products they are using and whether they contain wheat or gluten, and glibly apply night creams (to absorb into our skin as we sleep) and mud packs that promise similar benefits. Inquiring into the gluten content of cosmetics, I contacted more than twenty leading companies, then I waited. I was discouraged, particularly by the blatant rudeness of some of the responses I received. Meanwhile, I had to learn whether gluten could be absorbed through the skin. Some websites answered that question with a direct "no". Even some physicians responded saying "no". However, since the skin is the largest living organ in the body and it does absorb various oils and emollients, listing gluten-containing components of medicinal and non-medicinal ingredients allows consumers with celiac disease (celiac disease) or wheat allergies to make informed choices when purchasing and/or consuming natural health products. It enables them to avoid gluten in quantities that may trigger adverse reactions. There are numerous articles on dermatitis herpetiformis and celiac disease making claims so contradictory that it is no wonder we are confused. And I'm not talking about accidental ingestion of gluten. Some such articles claim that trace amounts of gluten One article insists that the skin is not going to absorb gluten, even though our skin is a living organism that can absorb suntan lotions, trans-dermal drugs, etc. It is so susceptible to absorption that when you place a slice of onion in your sock you will taste it in your mouth the following day. How can these websites make such contrary claims? The skin absorbs flavors as well as creams containing gluten. On the other hand, "Glutino" had an article on record, written on September 14, 2010, regarding "Hidden Gluten in Health and Beauty Products". It states that if you apply hand lotion that contains gluten and then prepare food you are exposing yourself to accidental ingestion and your food to cross contamination. They suggest a site called: naturallydahling.com, a site that lists gluten-containing ingredients commonly used in cosmetics. Research proving the full extent of how much your skin absorbs is still unavailable, but to those who believe that "what goes on, goes in", the cosmetic industry is full of unknowns. The size of gluten molecules suggests that they may not be able to pass through the skin, but chemicals and technology designed to enhance skin absorption are already present, if not prevalent, in the cosmetic industry. These chemicals are potentially dangerous and often go untested for negative health effects, yet are widespread in lotions, antiperspirants, perfumes and the "Great Mother Market" anti-wrinkle cosmetics. Since the cosmetic industry is self-regulated it is more important than ever to carefully read labels and use natural or organic products whenever possible. If you find yourself reacting to a particular cosmetic, it is possible that you may have an increased sensitivity to gluten, an allergy or even dermatitis herpetiformis. But wait a minute! Aren't we told that gluten cannot pass through the skin? I suffered terribly from the use of an "Anti-Frizz" product for my hair that caused a massive outbreak of dermatitis herpetiformis. I should have read the label all the way down to the end. I would have found, in very small print, "wheat germ oil". When researching for this article, I wrote to the company and mentioned my problems with their product. I received an apology and a sample of their "new and improved" "Frizz-Ease" product. They obviously do not know their own products and the fancy names they use are as confusing to them as they are to me. The "new and improved" product contained Avena Sativa, the Latin name for OAT. I was also told that I likely just had "hives" on the back of my scalp, as oats are still somewhat controversial. Some research suggests that oats in themselves are gluten free, but that they are virtually always contaminated with other grains during cultivation, harvest, distribution or processing. Recent research indicates that a protein naturally found in oats (avenin) contains peptide sequences closely resembling some peptides from wheat gluten. The oat peptides caused mucosal inflammation in significant numbers of celiac disease sufferers. Some examination results show that even oats that are not contaminated with wheat particles may be dangerous. Again, I was told not to introduce oats into my diet, or use oatmeal as a facial mask until I had been free of a dermatitis herpetaformis outbreak for at least a year. Thus far I have not been able to get relief for that long. It seems the celiac or those who suffer from dermatitis herpetiformis {and let's face it, most people suffering from dermatitis herpetaformis have celiac disease} have to apply the rule of "caveat emptor" - Let the buyer beware. Tolerance to gluten varies among individuals with celiac disease and there are limited clinical scientific data on a threshold for the amount of gluten required to initiate or maintain an immunological reaction in celiac disease patients. "Therefore there is no clear consensus on a safe gluten threshold level." The Dermatologist I see at The University of British Columbia Hospital has told me to tell people in restaurants that gluten is poison to my system and I can become very ill from ingesting gluten. They are a little more careful before telling me a dish is gluten free, and hopefully through education the cosmetic industry is going to improve its testing and cease glibly stating things as "fact" when they simply do not know. Industries that produce over-the-counter medications and vitamin supplement, especially those that may contain gluten as a binding agent, should also be scrutinized. We have come a long way, but large challenges are still ahead. One of our biggest challenges is reading the labels on these products. One almost needs to carry a magnifying glass when shopping. Cosmetics, which include hair products, soaps, perfumes and toothpastes also run us into problems, often big, "itchy" problems. The male celiac/dermatitis herpetaformis experience can also include outbreaks from any product that comes into contact with the skin and particularly those that "stay" on the hair or skin. Who would have known that sun tan lotions could contain wheat germ oil? It is difficult enough to eliminate words such as "triticum vulgare" the Latin name of wheat or "wheat germ" containing ingredients! In preparation for this article, I contacted the following companies: Avon, Clairol, Clarins, Clinique, Coty, Covergirl, Estee Lauder, Garnier, John Frieda, John Paul Mitchell, L'Oreal, Mabelline, Marcelle, Neutrogena, Olay, Pantene, Revlon, and companies that go under general all-encompassing headings such as "Life Brand". This can be a daunting task, and "gluten free" and "wheat free" are not the same thing. Some of the things that I learned in this rather massive undertaking include the rule of "Pac Man". Companies are sometimes taken over by bigger companies and when this occurs their rules change. A company that at one time did not test on animals or use machines that were cleaned prior to using products claiming to be gluten free are now glibly adopting the "new bigger and better". I was shocked to find out that some of the containers from the smaller company were still being used after these PAC MAN take-overs, to save on manufacturing costs. And, remember, once several ingredients are combined the "organic" ingredient probably ceases to be "organic". Some women (and men, you are not exempt here) expect to pay a higher price for a luxury brand assuming that the gorgeous bottle of eye cream sold at Saks for $60.00 is going to work better than the $1.99 tube on the clearance rack of a local store. Just ensure the product has not reached its "sell by" date because it may all be psychological. What you have to concern yourself about, as a celiac patient or a person with dermatitis herpetiformis, is whether there is gluten or wheat in that product. Before you splurge on an expensive product take the time to compare it to a similar product from one of their sister brands. Usually an online store (like Drugstore.com) will list the ingredients. Or you can check on a site like "Makeup Alley" which is a great resource, offering numerous reviews and you can ask questions of the extremely knowledgeable posters on this message board. Another great resource is a large paperback book, titled "Do not go to the Drugstore Without Me" written by Paula Begoin. When I purchased the books in 2001 it was in its 5th Edition. NB: This is not a book specifically for celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis, but it was in this book that I found out about "Glutamic Acid". It is derived from wheat gluten and is an amino acid that can have water binding properties for the skin. It also explains glycerylesters that form a vast group of ingredients that are a mixture of fatty acids, sugars, and non-volatile alcohols. These fats and oils are used in cosmetics as emollients and lubricants as well as binding and thickening agents. At the back of this book is a list of the companies that do not test on animals and those that do, but again, the PAC MAN Rule applies. I purchased the book for myself, my daughter, and daughter-in-law, specifically because when my daughter was in her twenties she seemed to think she simply must buy her shampoo from the hairdresser because only $45.00 shampoo was good enough for her hair. It was a big eye opener when she moved out of home and had to purchase it herself! I believe that the more we know about beauty products and the beauty industry the wiser our purchases will be. Consider, for instance, the cost of research and development for say, L'Oreal who develop formulas that can be used in Garnier Shampoos ($3.99) and Kerastase shampoo ($29.99) It doesn't take long to realize that it is a good idea to compare products at different ends of the price scale. Sometimes, two products from two different brands will have the same patent number. The difference is in the non-active ingredients, which give it a unique texture, scent and/or color. Also, it is wise to photo-copy, and even apply plastic covering to lists of "safe" beauty products, just as it is wise to keep a copy of "safe" and "unsafe" foods on hand when you go shopping. When you cannot even pronounce some of the words used in foods and beauty products how can you be expected to remember what is safe to apply to your hair and skin? I received a very nice letter from Teresa Menna, Manager at L'Oreal in Quebec who told me that L'Oreal has abolished gluten in the composition of L'Oreal products. However, on reading more literature I find that Garnier is a mass market cosmetic brand of L'Oreal, and L'Oreal is part of the Group P&G. P&G stands for Proctor and Gamble and P&G Beauty brands can be found on the site:_ http://pgbeautygroomingscience.com/product.php {The Company Garnier Laboratories was started in 1906 and acquired by L'Oreal in the 1970's}. I was unaware prior to researching this article that L'Oreal owned Kerastase, or that L'Oreal had purchased the MAC Cosmetic line, or that the KAO Brands Company owns Ban, Biore, Jergens and John Frieda. Here are some of the ingredients you might find in cosmetics that could indicate wheat or gluten: Avena Sativa {Latin name of oat, or "oat" term containing ingredients Hordeum distichon {Latin name of barley, or "barley" term containing ingredients} Hydrolyzed malt extract Hydrolyzed wheat protein Hydrolyzed vegetable protein Wheat germ Vitamin E Cyclodextrin Barley extract Fermented grain extract Oat (Avena sativa) Samino peptide complex Secale Cereale (Latin name of rye, or "rye" term containing ingredients) Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Phytosphingosine extract Triticum vulgare {Latin name of wheat, or "wheat" term containing ingredients} Dextrin Dextrin palmitate Maltodextrin Sodium C8-16 Isoalkylsuccinyl Wheat Protein Sulfonate Yeast extract Anything with wheat in the name Thoughts: Some cute person gave the warning to ensure your lipstick is gluten free even if you don't have any skin issues. You could swallow some lipstick and get gluten in your system! Another person adds at the bottom of their e-mail to be sure to check guidelines regularly because company policies can change yearly and the list is only to be considered as "guidelines" and make-up ingredients can change each time a company changes or the scientists within that company decide to add to or delete certain products. {Makes you feel very safe as a celiac/dermatitis herpetaformis person doesn't it?} Another e-mailer suggested that mascara labeled as a "thickening agent" should be fearfully evaluated by the celiac/dermatitis herpetaformis person because the thickening agent is often "flour" and can sometimes cause eyelashes to fall out! Who knew? Noted on one e-mail, ‘So-called luxury brands can be laden with synthetic ingredients that do not cost more than their not so luxurious counterparts. True natural products that do perform, and there are a few such brands on the market, are authentic natural products that actually deliver what they promise and they truly do cost more to make because raw ingredients are much higher in cost. In fact, the cost is significantly higher when pure high grade ingredients are used. Letter received: " We have compiled a list of gluten free beauty products available on sephora.com. These products do not contain any wheat, rye or barley derivatives, and they were made in gluten-free laboratories so there is no chance of cross-contamination. But since you cannot be too careful, discontinue use of any product that triggers an attack." Letter received from Clairol:- "Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Although it is not added directly to our product, it may be present in fragrances. Due to the difficulty of tracing the source ingredients for the variety of fragrances used in manufacturing our products, we cannot provide specific levels of gluten content for any of our fragrance blends. Be aware that even products labeled "unscented" will still contain masking scent, therefore they may potentially contain gluten." Advertisement: World's Top Ten Cosmetic Companies : "Beauty begins on the inside, check out our post on ‘The Top Five Foods for Amazing Skin'" - Posted by The Greenster Team "I finally got up the nerve to go through my own (their) personal care products and look them up on "SKIN DEEP" and was very disappointed. The Company that makes my mascara (L'Oreal) tests on animals as does the company that makes my eyeliner (Covergirl) and my under eye concealer (Made by Physician's Formula) contains parabens" THE GREENSTER TEAM creates great articles, list the top ten cosmetic companies, what portion of the world's market they share and their hazard range. Letter received from Mabelline:- "Please find below most ingredients containing gluten (wheat and other grains). We invite you to take this list and compare it to our ingredient listings every time you buy a new product. When in doubt, do not hesitate to do your own research or contact your doctor." {Caveat Emptor} REMEMBER:- The truth is that there is no such thing as gluten free. The FDA has proposed a less than 20 ppm gluten -free standard in 2006. That was its first attempt to define the term gluten free, but the agency has yet to finalize it. The USDA is awaiting the FDA's decision before moving ahead. STILL WAITING. With the number of products making unregulated gluten free claims on the rise, the marketplace can be scary for consumers with gluten sensitivity and wheat allergies. Why hasn't the FDA finalized its 2006 definition of gluten free? As part of sweeping legislation known s FALCPA the Food Allergen Labelling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004, Congress ordered the FDA to define and permit the voluntary use of the term gluten free on the labeling of foods by August 2008. As directed, the FDA issued proposed gluten-free regulations on schedule but seems to have failed to follow through with a final ruling. There has been no explanation for the delay. Since the Cosmetic Industry is a self-regulating body it seems {appears, is assumed} that we the consumers are on our own as far as researching what goes on our skin and in our hair, because some of the letters I have received leave it to the celiac or dermatitis herpetiformis sufferer to research their own products. Even a letter from Avon states:- "Although Avon sells quality products, there is always possibility of contamination during manufacturing or changes/substitutions of ingredients. As with everything related to celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis and gluten Intolerance, products, ingredients and preparation may change over time. Your reactions to a specific product, ingredient may be different from the reactions of others. Like eating at a restaurant, you have to make a choice whether to consume/use a product. The list is meant to be a "guide" and does not guarantee that a product is 100% free of gluten. Dacia Lehman, Avon and GIG assume no responsibility for its use and any resulting liability or consequential damages is denied." LETTER: - Proctor and Gamble "The WHMIS rating is designed to rate raw materials and not formulated products such as ours. Nor are our consumer products required to be labeled under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard. Thus labelling of our products with WHMIS ratings or any other hazard rating should not be required by any state health and safety regulatory agencies." That letter is signed by Asela for the Pantene Team. LETTER:- May 2, 2012 - xyz@ca.loreal.com - "We have received your message and we will get back to you as soon as possible. Web Sites: Gluten-free Lifestyle: glutenfree-lifestyle.com (Gives gluten free products by type and by company) i.e.: deodorants, face & body wash, make-up, suntan lotion, toothpaste, moisturizer, lotion, shampoo & conditioner, shave cream, gels, after shave, laundry products, cleaners, soap, etc. Beauty Industry: Who Owns What? Glutino - Hidden Gluten in Health Products - Glutino & Gluten Free Pantry Blogs: www.gluten-free-cosmetic-counter.org Beauty Blogging Junkie Ebates Shopping Blog In The Makeup Lipstick Powder n'Paint Shop With a Vengeance Smarter Beauty Blog The Beauty Brains Sephora Sephora's iGoogle Beauty Portal References: Codex Standard for Foods for Special Dietary Use for Persons Intolerant to Gluten. Codex STAN 118 - 1979 ROME Government of Canada 2008 - Regulations Amending the Food and Drug Regulations (1220- Enhanced Labeling for Food Allergen and Gluten Sources and Added Sulphites) Health Canada 2007 - celiac disease and the Safety of Oats Labeling of Natural Health Products Containing Gluten - Health Canada Notice 2010
  6. Celiac.com 06/24/2017 - A long-time pasta lover with celiac disease is desperately fundraising for surgery after losing half his body weight on a gluten-free diet. Years of eating lots of pasta and high calorie meals had left Christopher DeLorenzo weighing over 400 pounds. "My grandparents were Italian so I grew up eating lots of pasta…all I would do was eat, eat, eat always pasta and pizza, my stomach was like an endless pit," said the Phillipsburg, New Jersey, native. DeLorenzo's battle with portions and weight began early. At just 12 years old, he already tipped the scales at 250 pounds. His struggles with food led to years of dieting, and numerous attempts to lose weight. "My digestive system was terrible before weight loss surgery. I was forever complaining to doctors that there was something wrong but I was told that I was eating too much," says DeLorenzo. DeLorenzo found some improvement with weight loss surgery, but it wasn't until he was diagnosed with celiac disease and gave up gluten that he saw his health return. "Now I believe I can attribute a lot of the problems I was having to my body reacting badly to gluten." Still, the experience has left DeLorenzo with a mass of excess skin that looks, he says, like a 'deflated airbag.' He is currently seeking donations to fund surgery to remove the excess skin. Read more at Entertainmentdaily.co.uk
  7. My daughter is 7 and has been complaining of itchy skin, especially at night, for several months. Occasionally she says it feels like something is crawling on her. She is extremely sensitive to cross contamination, but up until now her symptoms have been mostly IBS. We've tried everything we can think of. We rewashed all of her clothes and sheets in dye-free, fragrance free detergent. We switched shampoos and conditioners. We cleaned the air ducts and checked for mold. We've slathered her with coconut oil in case of dry skin. We had her checked for more food intolerances, and her IGg test came back positive for dairy and almonds, so we've eliminated those in addition to gluten and oats, but it hasn't helped the itching. We're giving her calcium & magnesium at night, along with some Benadryl to help relieve the symptoms, but it only seems to make her drowsy, not truly give relief. Her pediatrician ordered blood tests to check her liver, kidneys, and thyroid, but it all came back normal, apart from a slightly low white blood cell count. We're supplementing her with folate and gluten-free food-based iron because she frequently complains of fatigue. A blood panel on common food and environmental allergens (IGe) came up with no allergies. This is so frustrating. Every night she cries that she's itchy and can't get comfortable, and we're no closer to finding answers and getting her relief than we were at the beginning.
  8. dont seem to be getting any working treatment creams steroids antibiotic nothing seems to be working please help
  9. Does anyone know if my dull skin - prone to closed comedones is related to a histamine intolerance (based on their experience perhaps). I have Coeliacs which puts me at risk of other food intolerances. On a day to day basis, being a veggie, I eat a lot of tomatoes and yesterday I made a (granted kind of wierd) lunch including nori sushi and loads of tomatoes all wrapped up. then again thinking back now, I also ate some engevita yeast. But I eat tomatoes all the time and my skin is usually scattered with teeny bumps. In this case, my face immediately went warm and red, my skin prickled on my left cheek and when I went to look at why - a spot sort of immediately rose up! The other time I have experienced a similar reaction is when I ate waaay too much Engevita nutritional yeast and I got a rash on my face and belly. In addition I randomly get these red rash bumps on my elbows but never often enough to take notice. I very rarely eat the yeast so I doubt its whats is effecting my face skin. I do know what eating a lot of it does to me though in terms of that all over rash - lesson learned on being greedy. Does this mean I am allergic to something? I have a tendency to over eat certain foods in phases. I gave myself Coeliacs by really becoming addicted to gluten - cereal, breadsticks you name it. My skin is so dull and dehydrated looking even though im only 23. I know my gut is unhealthy and damaged but apart from going gluten free I don't know how else to heal it. Aloe Vera? Probiotics? Prebiotics? Any advice or similar experiences relating to Coeliacs/ histamines and skin greatly appreciated!
  10. I'm 19 years old and I have been diagnosed for about 4 years now. Everything had been wonderful following the gluten free diet until 8 months ago. I began to get all of my GI symptoms back and new ones. My skin broke out in rashes, my skin around my lips are so chapped they bleed and my scalp is peeling. Nothing is my life style has changed. After numerous doctors, one came up with the idea that my body never stopped producing antibodies, therefore giving me these symptoms. I am now being put on immunosuppressants. This has really hurt me emotionally with how I look and physically. does anyone have this? Or even ever heard of it? If so, is there advice you would give me. I'm a bit frighten for my health. ??
  11. Hi everyone! So I have had scalp/skin seborrhea for the past 3 years. My dermatologist has prescribed me numerous ointments and medications, all of which i stopped applying after I googled the ingredients. About 7 months ago I was speaking to a family friend who is currently in med school, he advised me to try cutting out gluten as dermatitis was an inflammatory disease which can be triggered by the protein in gluten. I immediately stopped eating gluten and within weeks all signs of my SD were gone. Even if I cheated a little bit, I would immediately get red and itchy. I don't completely understand the correlation between gluten and seborrhea but I have read that gluten causes autoimmune reactions in the body. Psoriasis runs in my family as well as asthma, arthritis, reflux and IBS. I have had acid reflux since I was born as well. I am thinking about being tested for Celiac's but I have had an endoscopy before and all they diagnosed me with was reflux. If anyone has any thoughts on this or has experienced the same thing please share. i do not completely understand the idea of gluten intolerance quite yet! Thanks
  12. Hello, I'm brand new to the place and I'm not sure if I'm even posting in the right 'area' so feel free to tell me if I make a mistake or something. Okay, well, I guess I should begin and tell you a little about what the heck is going on with me! Even if it is a little TMI... I'm a 20 year old female. I'm pretty healthy; I try to swim everyday, although I don't get enough sleep as I should. I was diagnosed with hyperthyroid and was put on 100mg Synthroid; I take it in the morning. I've been on it for about two months now. I never forget to take it. Before I was even diagnosed with this thyroid problem I would get boils. I've had them on my armpits/side area and inner thighs. Some of them had to be lanced (Worst pain I've ever felt) and now I have purple scars My inner thighs are becoming a serious problem. I get them more frequently now and they hurt SO bad. They form in clusters, these purple hideous things. I don't know what to do. I use the anti-bacterial soap everyday and put cream on them but nothing works. I was a 'vegetarian' (No red meat) for many years but I recently (5 months ago) added red meat back into my diet because I also have a blood clotting disorder and need the iron. I just moved across the country and I haven't gotten in to see a doctor yet but I'm desperate for any kind of help at all! I just want these things gone for good; they're driving me insane! Help, please?
  13. I have not been tested for Celiac disease yet. But I decided to start a new topic about some of the symptoms I have so that I can learn. Not sure if this is a symptom of Celiac or not but it's something that is an annoyance to me. Tinging. I get tingling in my left upper thigh mostly. It happened while I was sitting down eating my pasta and it happens a lot when I lay down. I also get tingling in my hands, but not as frequent as the thigh tingling has been.
  14. New to the forum, I greatly appreciate the current posts and everyone's help with mine! I will try to be brief, but I think some explanation is needed. HOWEVER, I will ask the question first: Will my DH benefit or worsen from using clindamycin phosphate topical gel? I was prescribed this by my dermatologist (who claims I have perioral dermatitis... a label for “we don’t know” in my opinion) to use for 1.5 months. Backstory: After recently seeing a naturalist/herbalist, I believe I have a gluten, and possibly dairy, allergy. After much frustration from doctors diagnosing me with adult acne (I’m a 25 year old female who has never had more than a monthly breakout) and perioral dermatitis, I believe that my past severe anemia, poor health, and worsening face rash that started after eating raw vegan (detoxing) for a month has a logical, definite cause: GLUTEN. For 4 months now, the DH that started on both sides of my chin and mouth has spread to my nose, in between my eyebrows and forehead and has gotten worse. I have treated it with cortisone and a prescription cortisone, but the rash comes back worse after use. I have been eating gluten and dairy free and supplementing with herbs and vitamins for only a week (although with traveling and eating out, I don’t think my diet has been without wheat contamination), and I am aware that this treatment takes time.... but I am at my whits end. Makeup seems to make it worse, but I am too insecure to leave the house without makeup on... which barely conceals the rash when it is at its worse anyway. Call me shallow, but I’m starting to get depressed and extremely stressed out... which I’m sure makes it even worse! Vicious cycle, much!? I wasn’t going to use this antibiotic topical lotion, however, I don’t know what else to do and I am trying to stay away from prolonging use of the cortisone. Has anyone had experience with this lotion? Is there another topical lotion I could get prescribed? Thank you!
×
×
  • Create New...