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Found 14 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/19/2019 - Ancient gluten-free grains are helping African farmers to gain profit and save the environment by producing gluten-free beer that is safe for people with celiac disease. In Africa, local framers are growing nutritious, ancient gluten-free grains like corn and millet. In the process, they are growing a new economy, saving the environment, and brewing a delicious gluten-free beer that's safe for celiacs. It's a recipe for success. Gluten-Free Ancient Grains Are Nutritious Gluten-free ancient grains like millet and sorghum are rich in nutrients. They are also high in protein and antioxidants. Pearl millet, for example, has twice the protein of milk and sorghum is rich in vitamins, minerals, protein, and fiber. These crops are also drought-resistant, making them suitable for dry, hot climates. However, farmers tend to grow more popular crops like maize, wheat, rice, and soybeans. Gluten-Free Beer Helps Local Farmers Now, African farmers are using ancient grains like millet and sorghum to drive a new business in gluten-free craft beer and to preserve the environment. Since millet and sorghum are both gluten-free, they can be used to anchor brewing recipes for delicious, gluten-free beers. By sourcing grains from locally farmers, the brewers help to support local economies and community members. Drought Resistant Grains Help Save Environment And because millet and sorghum need significantly less water than wheat, and require less fertilizer and pesticide, growing them helps farmers to preserve the environment. Who knew that growing nutritious, ancient gluten-free grains could help local framers, save the environment, and result in a delicious gluten-free beer that's safe for celiacs? Talk about a winning plan. Stay tuned for more on this story.
  2. My DH was diagnosed with celiac disease several months ago and I was just getting a handle on baking again, turning out gluten free quick breads, muffins, biscuits, breads and cakes like a champ when.....more allergies. Now we are gluten free, dairy free, egg free.....and rice free. Yikes. I've converted to almond and coconut milk, that was a breeze. Vegan egg substitute just made its way into the house for baking and I have high hopes, though I haven't used it yet. I need a gluten free flour blend that doesn't contain rice flour. On hand I have oat, coconut, sorghum, fufu and amaranth flours, potato starch, corn starch, and xanthan gum. I need a mix that will use what I have on hand, and that will work for quick breads like banana and pumpkin bread. Anyone have a recipe that has worked for them in the past?
  3. Anyone know of a source for a nut free gluten-free sorghum? Many are produced on the same machinery that also mills almond flour.
  4. I was in my local convenience store and noticed these chips. They are called popcorners. It says gluten free/GMO free/ all natural on the bags The main ingredients are : whole grain sorghum, sunflower oil, sugar the spices vary from flavor to flavor. I have not looked them up online yet,,, I was just wondering if anyone has had any problems with them.
  5. Celiac.com 06/05/2013 - In the west, sorghum has traditionally been used to feed livestock. However, in Africa and India, it has long been used to feed people. Recently, U.S. farmers have begun producing sorghum hybrids that are white in color, known as "food-grade" sorghum. In an effort to determine if these new hybrids are safe for people with celiac disease, a team of researchers set out to make a detailed molecular study. The team included Paola Pontieri, Gianfranco Mamone, Salvatore De Caro, Mitch R. Tuinstra, Earl Roemer, Josephine Okot, Pasquale De Vita, Donatella B. M. Ficco, Pietro Alifano, Domenico Pignone, Domenica R. Massardo, and Luigi Del Giudice. They are variously affiliated with the Istituto di Genetica Vegetale (IGV), CNR−Portici, c/o Dipartimento di Biologia, Sezione di Igiene, Napoli 80134, Italy, the Istituto di Genetica e Biofisica “Adriano Buzzati-Traverso” (IGB-ABT), CNR, in Napoli, Italy, the Istituto di Scienze dell’Alimentazione (ISA), CNR, in Avellino, Italy, with the Consiglio per la Ricerca e la sperimentazione in Agricoltura, Centro di Ricerca per la Cerealicoltura (CRA-CER) in Foggia, Italy, the Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche e Ambientali at the Università degli Studi di Lecce, Italy, and the Istituto di Genetica Vegetale, CNR, in Bari, Italy, with the Department of Agronomy at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana, the Nu Life Market in Healy, Kansas in the United States, with Victoria Seeds Ltd. in Kampala, Uganda. Their study, which includes molecular evidence that sorghum lacks the proteins toxic to people with celiac disease, appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Paola Pontieri and colleagues explain that those gluten proteins, present in wheat and barley, trigger an immune reaction in people with celiac disease that can cause abdominal pain and discomfort, constipation, diarrhea and other symptoms. This strong new biochemical evidence shows that these sorghum hybrids are safe for people with celiac disease. The researchers describe evidence from an analysis of the recently published sorghum genome, the complete set of genes in the plant, and other sources, that verify the absence of gluten proteins. They also note that sorghum has provides high nutritional value. Their report concludes that "[f]ood-grade sorghums should be considered as an important option for all people, especially celiac patients." The authors acknowledge funding from the Regione Campania, the Istituto Banco di Napoli -- Fondazione and the Compagnia di San Paolo. Source: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry ACS News Service Weekly PressPac: April 3, 2013
  6. Hey guys, I was diagnosed with Celiac Sprue based on tissue transglutaminase anti-body screening almost six years ago. I've been gluten free ever since. It wasn't until about 2-3 years ago that gluten free beer became a bit of a trend and my brother in law have got in to home brewing our very own gluten free beer. For our small 5 gallon batches every piece of equipment that I've used has been dedicated gluten free from the day I bought it. The question I have for everyone is: How comfortable are people drinking gluten free beer on non-dedicated gluten free lines? I believe that neither redbridge nor bards produces their gluten-free beers on dedicated lines, they instead clean the shared equipment. I wanted to get the view of other celiacs about gluten free beer (and for now I'm completely ignoring beer that tries to lower its barley content like estrella and omission). Thanks guys
  7. Celiac.com 10/03/2012 - In an effort to expand the market for Kansas-grown sorghum, a professor at Kansas State University and a group of food science graduate students are conducting research into the use of sorghum in new gluten-free food products for people with celiac disease. Kansas is one of the top sorghum producers in the U.S. In 2006, as the manufacturing of gluten-free products started to take off, sorghum farmers began looking for alternative uses for their crop. Fadi Aramouni, K-State professor of food science, said that quest triggered the university's research into sorghum as a gluten alternative. In America, sorghum has traditionally been used for animal feed, but the growing market for gluten-free foods, along with the availability of food-grade sorghum, is fueling the use of sorghum in these types of food products, he said. Aramouni said the research initially focused on developing a sorghum-based tortilla. He and the students looked at the six varieties of sorghum grown in Kansas and determined which one they thought would work best. They considered factors such as grain hardness, protein, carbohydrate and fiber content, shelf life, dough quality, and flavor. Right away, the research team ran into problems with milling, "because it turns out that the particle size during the milling will affect the properties of the sorghum flour," Armuni said. One problem is that sorghum tends to form a batter rather than a dough, so it is necessary to add eggs and other stabilizers, such as gums, to craft a suitable dough. Using the facilities at Kansas State's grain and science industry department, along with the U.S. Department of Agriculture laboratory in Manhattan, the research team has been able to create tortillas, breads, Belgian waffles and waffle cones from sorghum. Their research is largely funded by the Kansas Department of Agriculture, and includes comparing the glycemic index of their sorghum products to those made of wheat, corn and rice. The glycemic index measures how a given carbohydrate raises blood glucose. In the last few years, the team's sorghum-based creations have won first prize in the American Association of Cereal Chemists competition. using their new knowledge of sorghum, the researchers are now working to create gluten-free soft pretzels, sweet rolls and dinner rolls, vanilla-flavored Waffle Cones and Crunchums, a raspberry-jalapeno-flavored sorghum snack. "This is not cooking. This is science," Aramouni said. It is important science, he adds, because people who must eat gluten-free food need better, more nutritious products. What new gluten-free products would you like to see on the market? Share your comments below. Source: CJOnline.com
  8. Celiac.com 07/25/2012 - While a great deal of progress has been made with gluten-free food over the last ten years, many celiacs still feel that they are 'missing out' on gluten-containing foods. Fadi Aramouni, professor of food science at Kansas State University is working to change this through extensive research and testing on sorghum, as well as other wheat alternatives. Sorghum is an appealing alternative to wheat because it is already widely produced in the United States (it is primarily used as feed). The problem is that sorghum is different from wheat, and requires different processing methods to yield food products that are comparable to their wheat counterparts. Aramouni and his team of students and researchers began their search for a non-gluten wheat substitute by carefully inspecting the six varieties of sorghum that are grown in Kansas. Qualities such as grain hardness, dough quality, stretching and rolling qualities, protein, carbohydrates and fiber content as well as taste and look of the finished product were all considered. According to Aramouni, this stage of their research yielded an important discovery: the milling stage dramatically alters the properties of sorghum flour. Different particle sizes yield different results, so the consistency and taste of sorghum-based foods can be modulated before they are even prepared or cooked. In addition to the taste and consistency, Aramouni's team also found that particle size alters sorghum's glycemic index, so it is possible that a very specific milling practice could make products healthier, perhaps even compared to other gluten-free wheat alternatives like corn and rice. Along with the grain science and industry department at Kansas State University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture laboratory in Manhattan, Kansas, Aramouni and his team have developed a variety of sorghum-based tortillas, waffle ice cream cones, breads and Belgian waffles. Time and many taste tests will tell whether Aramouni's research will pay off in the form of more appetizing gluten-free products, but at the very least he and his team are helping us understand that is not just about what grains you use, but how they are processed. Source: http://www.newswise.com/articles/research-with-gluten-alternatives-shows-promise-for-kansas-sorghum-farmers-and-consumers
  9. Celiac.com 10/16/2008 - Having gone gluten-free I, like many of you,have been struggling with gluten-free baking challenges. I began withpancakes. My first pancakes, made with a popular mix, were not thelight, fluffy things that I remembered. My son compared them to hockeypucks. They got eaten, but were not a favorite. The next time I tried apopular author's gluten-free pancake recipe. These were a hit, and didnot have the sourness of the popular mix (which were bean-based)! Theauthor's recipe was also based on sorghum flour, so I have becomeconvinced that sorghum holds the greatest potential for gluten-freebaking. I also tried the author's recipe for bread, which is based onher same sorghum flour mix as her pancakes. The bread, however, was adisaster, and it collapsed as soon as it was taken from the pan. Ithink possibly that the problem was that by the time you take hersorghum flour mix, and add the additional potato starch called for inmaking the bread mix, you end up with a mix that is overwhelminglystarch rather than flour. There is actually very little sorghum flourin it by that point. I repeated these problems when trying to use yetanother popular sorghum-based gluten-free bread mix. Meanwhile,in my search for a good sorghum bread recipe I kept coming across ablurb by the Agricultural Research Service to the effect that they haddiscovered that sour dough fermentation improved the quality of sorghumbread. Well, I have never been fond of the sourness of sourdough bread,but I was interested to know that the ARS was trying to find goodrecipes for sorghum bread. Apparently they are convinced, as I am, thatit holds the highest promise for good gluten-free bread. Well,heck, the Agricultural Research Service was my old stomping ground! Fora couple summers during college I worked at the ARS in Beltsville,Maryland, and at least one of them was spent in the Human NuitritionResearch Division. I worked as a biochemical technician. While I wasworking with test tubes and distillation apparatus, the wonderfularomas from the nearby test kitchens would waft by me and I would envythe taste testers. I decided to contact those sorghum researchers whohave been involved in the search for a good gluten-free bread recipe. Iemailed them requesting to know if they had developed any goodnon-sourdough recipes, and I received the following replies (the replyfrom Tilman Schober was particularly valuable): Dear Hallie Davis, Thereare a couple of things which could help you to get the desiredgluten-free sorghum bread. Sourdough is not imperative, it justadditionally helps to stabilize the bread structure. But we know thatmany people object to the flavor. So, besides sourdough, the followingthings may help: 1) Add the hydrocolloid HPMC (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose).It tremendously helps to get a good crumb. It is a food additive, andsome people object to it because they regard it as not natural.However, it is available in a food grade version designed for humanconsumption, and we simply know nothing that works better. Xanthan gum,probably the second best hydrocolloid, is much inferior in gluten-freebread making. There are various slightly different versions of HPMCcommercially available. As US government employees, we cannot endorse aspecific product. However, I would like to let you know that we hadgood success with Methocel K4M, food grade, which is available fromretailers like Ener-G Foods. The larger your bread pan the more likely the bread willcollapse. Try to use small pans, and just bake more loaves. This alsohelps to keep them fresh (just freeze the loaves which you do not eatfresh immediately after cooling). A good pan size might be e.g. 6inches by 2-3 inches and 2-3 inches high. Mix sorghum flour with starch. A recipe that has worked for usis described in the attached article (wHPMC, p. 5138). It is as follows: 105g water, 70 g sorghum flour, 30 g potato starch, 1.75 g salt, 1 gsugar, 2 g dry yeast, and 2 g HPMC. Highest accuracy in weighing theseingredients is not required, but I would prepare a larger amount ofdough (e.g. all ingredients multiplied by 10), so that it is easier toweigh. Mix all dry ingredients first in a large bowl (make sure thatthe HPMC is well mixed with the rest, it tends to form lumps withwater). Then add the water, mix (electric mixer) until a smooth batterresults, and pour (or spoon) the batter in the greased bread pans. Letthe dough rise for about 30-45 min (depends on temperature, observe howit increases in volume) and bake at 355 oF for about 30 min (depends onpan size, you will need to find out for your pan size and oven type). Another source for sorghum recipes you can find here: http://www.twinvalleymills.com/ They sell a celiac disease with recipes (it is copyrighted, so I cannot send it to you). If you have success, we would love to hear about it. If you need further assistance, please let us know. Kind regards Tilman Tilmanthen wrote again, enclosing a copy of the referenced article, andasking that I cite it. The article was published in the "Journal ofAgricultural and Food Chemistry", 2007, 55, 5137-5146, and is entitled,"Gluten-Free Sorghum Bread Improved by Sourdough Fermentation:Biochemical, Rheological, and Microstructural Background." The Authorswere Tilman J. Schober, Scott R. Bean, and Daniel L. Boyle. They areworking in the Manhattan, Kansas Grain Marketing and ProductionResearch Center of the Agricultural Research Center. The otherperson who responded to my inquiry was Scott R. Bean. He sent me anearlier but related article, entitled, "Use of Sorghum Flour in BakeryProducts." This article was published in the "AIB InternationalTechnical Bulletin" in Volume XXVIII, issue 3, May/June 2006. Theauthors here were: T.J. Schober and S.R. Bean, USDA-ARS, GMPRC, Manhattan, KS 66502 E.K. Arendt, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland C. Fenster, Savory Palate Inc., Centennial, CO 80122 This article had the formulas for two sorghum flour blends:Sorghum-Corn Flour Blend and Sorghum-Bean Flour Blend. Furtherreferences for the mixes and also a brownie recipe is given as: Fenster, C. 2004. Wheat-Free Recipes & Menus: Delicious, Healthful Eating for People with Food Sensitivities. New York: Avery (Penguin Group). Arecipe for Sorghum Waffles was also given with a citation, "Recipe byAmy Perry and Meredith Wiking, used with permission fromwww.twinvalleymills.com." So, the ARS, like me, is using recipesby popular authors and Twin Valley Mills as a starting point, and areexperimenting from there.I don't know about you, but I, forone, intend to get the Methocel K4M, food grade, and try using itinstead of guar gum or xanthan gum! I also plan to try the 70-30sorghum mix described today by Dr. Schober. I am TIRED of gummy bread,and collapses!
  10. Celiac.com 09/10/2007 - Sorghum is a cereal grain with poised for development as a major crop for human nutrition. The flour made from white sorghum hybrids is lightly colored, and offers a bland, neutral taste that leaves no trace of unusual colors or flavors when added to food products. These features make sorghum favorable for use in wheat-free food products. While sorghum is considered as a safe food for celiac patients, primarily due to its relationship to maize, no direct studies have been made regarding its safety for individuals with celiac disease and gluten intolerance. Thus, further study was warranted to clearly demonstrate the safety and tolerability of sorghum for celiac patients. A team of researchers set out to determine the safety and tolerability of sorghum flour products in adult celiac patients The team consisted of Carolina Ciacci, Luigi Maiuri, Nicola Caporaso, Cristina Bucci, Luigi Del Giudice, Domenica Rita Massardo, Paola Pontieri, Natale Di Fonzo, Scott R. Bean, Brian Ioerger and Marco Londei. Study participants who consumed sorghum-derived food product for 5 days straight experienced no gastrointestinal or other symptoms and the level of anti-transglutaminase antibodies was unchanged at the end of the 5-day medical challenge. Sorghum protein digests produced no morphometric or immunomediated alteration of duodenal explants from celiac patients. In both in vitro and in vivo challenge, sorghum-derived products show no toxicity for celiac patients. Sorghum can thus be regarded safe for people with celiac disease. Clinical Nutrition, 24 August 2007 health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.
  11. Celiac.com 12/03/2007 - Along with the increasing rate of celiac disease diagnosis comes a corresponding increase in the need for safe, inexpensive, and appetizing gluten-free foods. Sorghum is inexpensive to grow, has a neutral flavor, and has been assumed to be gluten-free due to its close relationship with maize. Sorghum has been consumed in many parts of the world in foods and beverages such as flat breads, porridge, and beer. However, in the United States, the country that grows most of the world's sorghum, it is used primarily as animal feed. Researchers tested the safety of sorghum in duodenal biopsies (tissue samples from the small intestine) from 8 celiac patients and 4 patients with other gastrointestinal disorders (i.e., not celiac disease). Biopsies treated with sorghum protein digests showed no increase in proteins involved in the immune response to gluten. By comparison, biopsies of celiac patients treated with gliadin or wheat protein digests showed an increase in these proteins, as expected. The immune response was not induced in biopsies of non-celiac patients, regardless of treatment. In the second part of the study, the safety and palatability of sorghum foods were tested in 2 female celiac patients, known to be compliant with a gluten-free diet. The patients ate sorghum in bread, cookies, and cake for 5 days. Antibodies for transglutaminase, known to be elevated after gluten consumption in celiac patients, did not increase in the patients during or after the sorghum challenge. The celiac patients rated the palatability of the foods as good or excellent and reported no increase in gastrointestinal (GI) or non-GI symptoms. Researchers from Italy, the United Kingdom and the United States carried out this preliminary study. The data indicates that sorghum is highly likely to be safe for consumption by those who are gluten-intolerant. Additional studies are required to determine the long-term safety of sorghum in the diet of celiac patients. References: Ciacci, C. et al. (2007) Celiac disease: In vitro and in vivo safety and palatability of wheat-free sorghum food products. Clin. Nutr. 26, 799-805. U.S. Grains Council Web Site. Sorghum. Accessed Dec 1, 2007.
  12. This recipe comes to us from Valerie Wells. Dry Ingredients: 1 cup sorghum flour 1 cup gluten-free flour mix (any kind) minus 2 tablespoons 2 tablespoons flax seed meal ¼ cup sugar of your choice ½ teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon xanthan gum Wet Ingredients: 3 egg yolks (or one whole egg) ¼ cup coconut oil, melted ½ cup yogurt, kefir or buttermilk ½ cup plus 2 heaping tablespoons applesauce Directions: Preheat oven to 400F. Grease 11 muffin tins. Mix dry ingredients. Stir in wet ingredients until just moistened. Do not over stir; batter may be lumpy. Fill muffin tins about 2/3 full. Bake 13-14 minutes.
  13. This recipe comes to us from Joyce. My sorghum blend is 2 cups sorghum, 2/3 cup arrow root, 1/3 cup tapioca (I sift this together into my sorghum blend container). In bowl mix: 1 cup sorghum flour ½ cup sorghum blend 1 ½ tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon xanthan gum 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt In another bowl: Beat 1 egg Add 2 tablespoons oil 1 cup milk 1 tablespoon lemon juice (I have used ½ teaspoon vitamin C crystals instead) Mix egg mixture into dry mixture. Make sure your pancake grill is nice and hot before you pour your batter on the grill. They will be flat if you dont heat your grill enough.
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