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Found 8 results

  1. Celiac.com 12/20/2007 - The Specific Carbohydrate Diet is an excellent option in dietary intervention for celiac disease and was originally developed for that purpose over fifty years ago by Dr. Sydney Valentine Haas. Dr. Haas treated over 600 cases of celiac disease with his Specific Carbohydrate Diet, maintaining his patients on it for at lease twelve months, and found that the prognosis of celiac disease was excellent. "There is complete recovery with no relapses, no deaths, no crisis, no pulmonary involvement and no stunting of growth." Specific Carbohydrate Diet - A Dietary Intervention for Celiac Disease and AutismA fifty-year-old diet used by adults to combat Celiac Disease and other digestive and bowel problems is also having a remarkable effect on autistic children.The Specific Carbohydrate Diet restricts but does not eliminate or limit carbohydrate intake. It is neither a low carbohydrate diet nor low calorie diet. The Specific Carbohydrate Diet developed from the research and practice of celiac management by a pioneer in the field, Dr. Sydney Valentine Haas and his son, Dr. Merrill B. Haas. Haas discovered that feeding monosaccharides and restricting polysaccahrides is effective in manipulating the food supply of types of bacteria that damage the intestinal lining, flatten microvilli and interfere with nutrient absorption. The late Elaine Gottschall, pursued her study of the effect of food on the functioning of the digestive tract and its effects on behavior for nearly four decades. Gottschall had visited Dr. Haas as a last resort before agreeing to radical surgery for her five year old daughter. The child was cured on Specific Carbohydrate Diet and went on to resume a normal life and diet. Gottschall, sought additional answers and pursued the brain-gut connection after the death of the senior doctor Haas until her own demise at age eighty-four. The diet has enjoyed great success among adults who follow it to heal Celiac Disease, Crohn's Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, and Irritable Bowel Disease. Celiac disease is considered incurable, but this diet can be a very effective treatment for it, especially when it is started very early for children. Recent research shows that more than 50% of children with autism have GI symptoms, food allergies, and mal-digestion or malabsorption issues. The history, an overview of celiac disease and the diet protocols are among topics that appear in in Gottschall's book, "Breaking the Vicious Cycle." The Specific Carbohydrate Diet excludes a category of carbohydrates not easily digested. The Specific Carbohydrate Diet is about the type of carbohydrates that will heal and not hurt. It is not about the quantity of carbohydrates and should not be confused with "low carb diets" or even the Paleo or "Caveman" diets to which it is sometimes compared. Elaine Gottschall was emphatic in stressing that the Specific Carbohydrate Diet is a balanced and wholesome diet. Thinking of the Specific Carbohydrate Diet as a low carb diet is one of the most common mistakes made by those who are not sufficiently informed. Eliminating carbohydrates can lead to a condition called "ketosis," which is why it is essential to include adequate carbohydrates in the daily menu. Carbohydrates contribute energy, essential nutrients, and fiber. People who have validated concerns about yeast may moderate the use of fruit and honey until things improve but should not have to eliminate them. Rest assured! You may include plenty of carbohydrates on Specific Carbohydrate Diet. Former choices of starchy foods like rice and potato are replaced with filling items like squash, bananas, peas, apples (and applesauce), avocados, almond flour muffins and others. These are carbohydrates that are easier to digest and more nutritious. Their nutrients are absorbed directly into the bloodstream without taxing a compromised digestive system. That is why the word "Specific" was chosen to name Specific Carbohydrate Diet. There is a strong brain-gut connection and it appears decreasing bacterial overgrowth is restoring cognitive abilities in many of the children following the special version for Autism, Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and Attention Deficit Hyperacticity Disorder. The autistic community of parents and doctors have favored popular dietary approaches like the gluten-free casein-free diet until recently, but in light of anectdotal reports of 75% success using the Specific Carbohydrate Diet as a dietary intervention, more physicians are recommending it. Parents and teachers of autistic children report changes in attitude, increases in skills and responsiveness, in some cases after only a few weeks on the diet. Although long term properly controlled studies have not been conducted, these numerous first hand reports attest to the potential this diet holds for the autism community, in addition to celiacs which have been helped by it for decades. The diet is more restrictive in some ways than the gluten-free casein-free diet, as most foods must be homemade, but the diet is varied, balanced, nutritional and the food every appetizing. Gluten sensitivity and intolerance to salicylates are symptoms of a damaged digestive system which is overrun with intestinal pathogens. When the health of the gut is restored, these symptoms disappear. It is better to cure the underlying cause than to just try to treat the symptoms. Because Specific Carbohydrate Diet reaches to the root cause of these problems by restoring the health of the digestive system, the Specific Carbohydrate Diet is being viewed as the optimal choice for celiacs and children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. As one mother has said, "When you see them emerge, the true child, with a loving personality, like an iridescent butterfly breaking out of its cocoon, well, that's why we all persevere." For more information about this diet please visit: http://breakingtheviciouscycle.info/ and http://www.pecanbread.com Editor's Note: Celiac.com supports the idea that the Specific Carbohydrate Diet is gluten-free and can be very helpful for many people, depending on their situation. We disagree, however, with the assertion that Elaine Gottschall makes in her book Breaking the Vicious Cycle that people with celiac disease can be cured by the Specific Carbohydrate Diet after being on it for a certain time period.
  2. Celiac.com 01/08/2008 - Scientists at the University of Finland have announced the discovery of a particular gene that is tied to the development of the celiac-associated skin disease dermatitis herpetiformis, which is the form of celiac disease found in a full 25% of all celiacs. The gene is called myosin IXB, and it is located on chromosome 19p13. In addition to being connected with a higher risk of celiac disease in both Dutch and Spanish populations, the gene has been associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease, systemic lupus, erythmatosus, and rheumatoid arthritis, which means that myosin IXB is likely a shared risk factor in all of these disorders. Researchers looked at nearly 500 Hungarian and Finnish families, plus another 270 patients and controls. What they found was a substantial linkage to chromosome 19p13 (LOD 3.76 P=0.00002) that lends great weight to the notion that this is a substantial risk factor. Other variants of the myosin IXB gene showed no connection with celiac disease, though they did show a small connection to dermatitis herpetiformis. Both phenotypes show a significant connection indicating that the role meaning that there still may be a role being played by nearby genes. They are calling for more comprehensive genetic and functional studies to determine what the exact nature of the role the myosin IXB gene in both celiac disease and in dermatitis herpetiformis. As more studies are conducted, and more data emerges, we are likely to get a much clearer genetic picture of both celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis. A clearer genetic picture will likely lead to new and novel approaches to treatment that permit much more effective targeting of treatment. Journal of Med. Genet. 2007 Dec 12
  3. Celiac.com 04/15/2010 - Ten years ago, I embarked on a life that came with a warning about the Specific Carbohydrate Diet from my naturopathic practitioner, "it is a great diet, but a hard one." Those were fighting words to someone who has made a lifetime of "cosmetic" dieting with tendencies to yo yo back and forth into the obesity zone. The Specific Carbohydrate Diet diet was chosen to relieve pain. Starting a new weight-loss diet had always been inviting and exciting. The magic of the initial water weight-loss, the restrictive ruthless regimentation, calorie counting, portion control and forced water consumption were as exciting as hair shirts and beds of nails for religious fanatics. Dieting was my religion, food was like the duplicitous friend who is an enemy at the same time. The years marched on and my "stuff and starve" lifestyle beat a destructive highway to digestive hell in the form of celiac disease, an illness that could have been caused by any number of things, age, a compromised immune system, a recent illness or maybe even the evil eye. That was ten years ago. It has turned out that the Specific Carbohydrate Diet is no transient companion to my fork, knife and spoon. It blossomed into a creative and motivating experience, a learning opportunity, a template for sharing, writing and creating recipes and a sometimes tiresome topic at social gatherings (although as we age, health chat is pretty popular). I have made more friends through the Specific Carbohydrate Diet than at the dog park and have been given the opportunity to help strangers. Food at the good restaurants pales in comparison to the ever innovative pure, tasty, quality meals and dishes I create from the Specific Carbohydrate Diet palette of foods. Excluded are refined sugars, starches and gluten and they are not much missed. After eight years on the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, I tried occasional servings of rice and potatoes and some dark chocolate just to see if I had healed. Sometimes I tolerated these well, sometimes not and mainly lost interest. As for grain, it can remain on that plain in Spain. I want no part of it. The Specific Carbohydrate Diet has not cured me, and I doubt that it will, but it is an effective dietary management program. Yes I still get the bloat, the night time rashes, and the irritated bowel and sometimes I still have a very touchy immune system. It depends on the load at a given time. One thing that is really helpful then is a few days back on the initial introductory portion of the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. It calms the "Gut Devils" and clears the "Digestive Decks." If people deal the "pity card" as I describe being on a gastric diet, I ignore it as my diet deals aces and also the "Get Out of Pain Jail" card and of course, to this old dieter, the permanent thrill of the drill.
  4. Celiac.com 05/03/2010 - Place a single tiny droplet of food coloring on a solid surface, a small plate will do nicely. Don't move it or touch it. What happens? Usually nothing. Do the same thing in a saucer of water and now what happens? The color spreads and permeates the water. This similar to the effects of eating a tiny amount of food restricted from your Celiac diet. I follow The Specific Carbohydrate Diet and it demands scrupulous attention to the kind of food I use and what is in it. The reason is that minuscule amounts of what we consider "The Undigestibles," feed bad gut bacteria, strengthen them, allow them to multiply and subdue friendly bacteria, all at the expense of a compromised digestive system. There are ways to determine food ingredients. We have all become more conscious of labels in recent years. Some tell us what is not in the product. I think for most of us celiacs, the magic words are "gluten-free." The Specific Carbohydrate Diet contingent is very fond of "free of starch, fillers, gluten and sugar." It's the favorite label of newcomers but not those in the know. That is because by US law, 2% of ingredients do NOT have to be disclosed on the label and are welcomed into our bodies by a gleeful band of bad bacteria creating a cause for celebration, feasting and procreation. Few commercial foods are approved for Specific Carbohydrate Diet and there are even problems with those that are. Ingredients and processing methods of store bought commercial foods are subject to change at any time and without notification. Periodically we contact companies requesting a document by regular mail or fax on company letterhead and signed by a living being. Email is not acceptable, neither is telephone validation. Does this sound reasonable? My own experience leads me to believe it is easier to have the Vatican approve a divorce than to squeeze a response even from certain juice companies whose products have been approved for years, something I attempted the last week in April 2010. Company number one agreed to send the letter. It hasn't arrived yet. Company number two looped me from Consumer Support to their nutritionist and I wound up in the legal department with assurance that they would get back to me (something like, "The check is in the mail?"). No word. These two products were chosen because of their wide availability in North America and even in a few other countries. What do I do? I have a very effective juicer! The fruit goes in with no additives and out comes juice with no additives, just as it should be. (we always dilute juice as in pure form it has too much natural sugar). It's my two percent solution.
  5. Celiac.com 12/26/2007 - Can children with Autism Spectrum Disorder eat their way out of their cocoons? Eight yearsago I knew little about autism. Fifty years ago I heard that a distantacquaintance of mine had an autistic child. It was extremely unusual at thetime. I needed it explained to me and was told that the child was almost totallyunresponsive. Recent statistics show that between one and one and ahalf million people in the USA are afflicted with autism, making it the fastest growing developmentaldisability. There has been a thirteen percent increasein autism since 1990. The term "autism" wasfirst coined by Eugen Bleuler a Swiss psychiatrist, and the term was also applied to those with adult schizophrenia. Initially parents were blamed andpsychological rejection was cited as a possible cause, but over time a greater understanding evolved and an analysis ofsymptoms and protocols for their treatment developed. If we examinethe history of dietary intervention for celiac disease, according toElaine Gottschall's Breaking the Vicious Cycle, initially the SpecificCarbohydrate Diet was widely favored . Only later on did thegluten-free casein-free diet begin to eclipse the Specific Carbohydrate Diet for the management of celiac disease, following a smallstudy published in Lancet in the U.K., and the diet gained enormouspopularity which has been maintained to the present. Researcherspublished results of their work with the gluten-free casein-free dietfor autism. Many people with autism noticed improvements once gluten and dairy products were removedfrom their diets. According to some estimates 60% of people with autism experience positiveeffects from the diet, and there are some reports of people recovering completely from Autism Spectrum Disorder. However,there is a subset of children who do not respond to the diet and get stalled orplateau at some point, and these people must often seek other treatment avenues. Less thanten years ago a few adults reported that the Specific CarbohydrateDiet was fostering encouraging progress in their Autism Spectrum Disorder children.Gottschall believed that in addition to gluten starches and certainsugars were at the root of digestive disorders. A small support group formedwhich followed the Specific Carbohydrate Diet to treat Autism Spectrum Disorder, and this group has grown from a handful to several thousandsince its inception. The majority of its members transitioned from the gluten-free casein-free diet. Some peoplewere told incorrectly that the Specific Carbohydrate Diet is an extension of the gluten-free casein-free diet, or that it is only suitableif the gluten-free diet fails. The protocols about food restrictions andcontamination differ. The Specific Carbohydrate Diet is, however, a unique stand-alone diet. Althoughchildren with autism who are on the Specific Carbohydrate Diet are in a statistical minority compared to those on the gluten-free casein-free diet, anecdotal reports indicate that their success rate is nearly 80%. It often turns out that some of those who initiallyfail have not followed the diet correctly, and they fare quite well when they start it over and do it correctly. In several small studies the Specific Carbohydrate Diet outperformed the gluten-free casein-free diet in the treatment of autism. Alarge scale formal study could cost up to one million dollars and therefore hasnot been conducted. In the absence of such studies mainstream medicinehas bypassed or dismissed the Specific Carbohydrate Diet as inconclusive, but some doctors have commented that sinceit is a healthy and balanced diet it is worth a try. One concern is thatpeople will abandon their medication, but this idea is not advocated by the support group. Ibecame interested in the autism-Specific Carbohydrate Diet connection when ElaineGottschall invited my support on the Internet list called "Elaine'sChildren," which was renamed subsequently renamed pecanbread@yahoo.com (www.pecanbread.com). WhenI began to read the stories of improvement, progress in behavior anddigestion, and of some who recovered from Autism Spectrum Disorder, I literally got chills. I began to archive those stories and combined several in a piecewhich I submitted to a parenting magazine. The editors were veryinterested but insisted on having a gluten-free casein-free diet author comment and counter mystory. Since I do not view dietary intervention as a competition thearticle was withdrawn. I am not sorry. Dietary intervention mustnot be a contest. The diet that WORKS is the diet to choose. Thatchoice may affect the entire future of a young human being and of theirfamily. It is critical for parents to explore, research, connect withothers and become informed so they can select the best option to fittheir needs. If you want to read more about ElaineGottschall be sure to read "All Her Children" at Pecanbread.com, and decide if this is a diet that could help your family. Editor's Note: Celiac.com supportsthe idea that the Specific Carbohydrate Diet is gluten-free and can bevery helpful for many people, depending on their situation. Wedisagree, however, with the assertion that Elaine Gottschall makes inher book Breaking the Vicious Cycle that people with celiac disease can be cured by the Specific Carbohydrate Diet after being on it for a certain time period.
  6. Gastroenterology, Oct 2003, Vol 125, No 4, p1032-41 Celiac.com 10/30/2003 – A Dutch research team has identified the specific regions of chromosome 19 that contribute to celiac disease. Despite its well-known association with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and DQ8, the pathogenesis of celiac disease has remained largely unknown. The team studied 82 Dutch families who met strict diagnostic criteria which included biopsies that presented Marsh III lesions. The 216 independent celiac disease patients were compared to 216 age and sex-matched controls. As expected the study found significant linkage to the suspected HLA region, but more importantly found additional, previously unknown and significant linkages at 19p13.1 (with a peak at marker D19S899), and at 6q21-22, which is ~70 cm downstream from the HLA region in question. The researchers conclude: "Significant linkage of celiac disease to chromosome region 19p13.1 was detected in our genome-wide screen. These results were confirmed by the association of D19S899 to celiac disease in an independent case-control cohort. Furthermore, we identified a possible second celiac disease locus on chromosome region 6q21-22." The study was dedicated to the memory of Lodewijk Sandkuijl (1953-2002), who died shortly after its completion. He was an inspiration to the researchers and was a world expert on biostatistics.
  7. Celiac.com 06/25/2003 - Below is an abstract of yet another study that supports the use of human anti-tTG type IgA serological tests to accurately diagnose celiac disease: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics Volume 17 Issue 11 Page 1415 - June 2003 Antibodies to human recombinant tissue transglutaminase may detect coeliac disease patients undiagnosed by endomysial antibodies N. Tesei*, E. Sugai*, H. Vázquez*, E. Smecuol*, S. Niveloni*, R. Mazure*, M. L. Moreno*, J. C. Gomez, E. Mauriño* & J. C. Bai* Background: The screening and diagnosis of coeliac disease have been simplified by the advent of new serological tools. Aim: To assess the clinical utility of a newly developed kit for antibodies to human recombinant tissue transglutaminase (hu-anti-tTG) in a large population of patients undergoing intestinal biopsy for suspected intestinal disorders. Methods: We evaluated 426 serum samples from consecutive adult patients (250 from untreated coeliac disease patients and 176 from individuals in whom a diagnosis of coeliac disease had been excluded), obtained at the time of intestinal biopsy. Samples were tested for immunoglobulin A (IgA) hu-anti-tTG by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay, IgA endomysial antibodies (EmA) by indirect immunofluorescence and IgA and IgG antigliadin antibodies by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. A sub-group of samples was also assessed for a guinea-pig-based anti-tissue transglutaminase. Results: According to the cut-off for hu-anti-tTG, the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were 91%, 96%, 97% and 87%, respectively. Simultaneous determination of EmA showed values of 86%, 100%, 100% and 83% for the same parameters. Although 19 coeliac disease patients (7.6%) were negative for EmA and hu-anti-tTG, both tests rendered superior statistical values to antigliadin antibody tests. At diagnosis, IgA deficiency was detected in 11 patients, but both assays were able to detect samples with mild to moderate deficiency. The comparison of hu-anti-tTG with EmA showed excellent concordance between the tests ( statistic, 0.85). Discordance was observed in 20 samples from coeliac disease patients (8%) and in nine samples from controls (5%). Fifteen samples had an EmA-negative but hu-anti-tTG-positive serology, and five showed the converse pattern. Comparison of human recombinant and guinea-pig tests showed concordant results in 96% of cases. Conclusions: The quantitative determination of hu-anti-tTG type IgA using a commercial enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay kit was highly sensitive and specific for the detection of coeliac disease. Our results in a large population of patients with a clinical condition suggestive of the disorder demonstrated that the test can be used to detect a substantial number of patients otherwise unrecognized by IgA EmA.
  8. V. Kumar,* M. Jarzabek-Chorzelska, J. Sulej, Krystyna Karnewska,** T. Farrell,* and S. Jablonska *IMMCO Diagnostics, Inc., Buffalo, New York 14228; Departments of Microbiology and Dermatology, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214; and Department of Dermatology, Warsaw School of Medicine, Warsaw, Poland; ** Department of Gastroenterology and Pediatrics, Selesian School of Medicine, Warsaw, Poland Clinical Diagnostic Immunology 9:1295-1300, 2002. Celiac.com 12/31/2002 - Background: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency is 10-15 times more common in patients with Celiac Disease (celiac disease) than in normal subjects. Serological tests have become the preferred methods of detecting both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with celiac disease. However, commercially available serological methods are limited in that they detect only the IgA isotype of antibodies (with the exception of IgG gliadin assays); hence, IgA deficient celiac disease patients may yield false negative serology. Methods: Fifteen celiac disease and ten non-celiac disease IgA deficient pediatric cases were examined for IgA and IgG antibodies to endomysium, gliadin and tissue transglutaminase. Results: Twenty five specimens with IgA deficiency were examined. Fifteen were celiac disease cases and ten were non-celiac disease cases. All fifteen IgA deficient celiac disease cases were positive for endomysium antibodies of the IgG isotype and for IgG gliadin antibodies. All but one of the IgA deficient celiac disease cases were also positive for IgG tissue transglutaminase antibodies. None of the non-celiac disease IgA deficient cases were positive for any of the antibody markers. All the specimens examined were also negative for IgA specific antibodies to endomysium, gliadin, and tissue transglutaminase. Conclusions: IgG specific antibody tests for endomysium, gliadin and tissue transglutaminase are useful for the identification of IgA deficient celiac disease patients. IgG antibody tests along with tests routinely being used in clinical laboratories can reliably detect all active celiac disease patients. In addition, the levels of these celiac disease-specific IgG antibodies could be used to monitor patient dietary compliance.
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