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Found 11 results

  1. Starbucks warning! I ordered a Banana Caramel Frappuccino, and they put something on top of it. I asked what it is, and was told 'crinkles'. I enquiried whether it has any gluten or wheat and was told no. aI felt assured. However the same night I started having bad tummy and bowel problems. I checked Starbucks website,and the 'crinkles' they put on my drink were actually graham, which is wheat! Huh. I was very,very sick for 3 days and also complained to Starbucks head office. They said they will talk to the staff at that branch and they then sent me £20 gift card to Starbucks. Huh, not good enough response imo to such a serious complaint, please be very careful if you drink/eat there.
  2. Celiac.com 05/21/2018 - Just a year ago, Starbucks debuted their Canadian bacon, egg and cheddar cheese gluten-free sandwich. During that year, the company basked in praise from customers with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity for their commitment to delivering a safe gluten-free alternative to it’s standard breakfast offerings. But that commitment came to an ignoble end recently as Starbucks admitted that their gluten-free sandwich was plagued by “low sales,” and was simply not sustainable from a company perspective. The sandwich may not have sold well, but it was much-loved by those who came to rely on it. With the end of that sandwich came the complaints. Customers on social media were anything but quiet, as seen in numerous posts, tweets and comments pointing out the callous and tone-deaf nature of the announcement which took place in the middle of national Celiac Disease Awareness Month. More than a few posts threatened to dump Starbucks altogether. A few of the choice tweets include the following: “If I’m going to get coffee and can’t eat anything might as well be DD. #celiac so your eggbites won’t work for me,” tweeted @NotPerryMason. “They’re discontinuing my @Starbucks gluten-free sandwich which is super sad, but will save me money because I won’t have a reason to go to Starbucks and drop $50 a week,” tweeted @nwillard229. Starbucks is not giving up on gluten-free entirely, though. The company will still offer several items for customers who prefer gluten-free foods, including Sous Vide Egg Bites, a Marshmallow Dream Bar and Siggi’s yogurt. Stay tuned to learn more about Starbucks gluten-free foods going forward.
  3. Celiac.com 02/12/2018 - Coffee giant Starbucks is debuting a new line of vegan, gluten-free and dairy-free options on menu throughout the UK. The company's announcement was timed to coincide with 'Veganuary,' a month-long promotion of the vegan lifestyle. The inclusion of oat milk to the new menu means that Starbucks now offers four dairy-free alternatives for their hot beverages: oat milk; almond milk; coconut milk; and soy milk. BBQ jack fruit is apparently the new vegan alternative to pulled pork, so the new item should be both an emotional and nutritious alternative to meat. If you're hankering for a meaty, vegan sandwich alternative, then the bbq jackfruit wrap is just the thing for you. The new seeded whole wheat wrap comes with shredded carrot and puréed sweetcorn slaw. According to Starbucks, the jackfruit wrap is chalked full of protein. For those who haven't given up meat, but have given up gluten, Starbucks offers a Chicken & Pesto Gluten Free Panini. Beginning January 2018, these and other items will be available at Starbucks locations throughout the UK. Hopefully this and more gluten-free options will spread to Starbucks in the USA and other countries. Read more at: Gloucestershirelive.co.uk
  4. Celiac.com 03/24/2017 - Does it meet the FDA standard for a gluten-free product? Is it safe for people with celiac disease? Starbucks' new Gluten-Free Breakfast Sandwich looks yummy. But, why does Starbucks' website feature a disclaimer saying the company cannot guarantee the absence of allergens, including wheat? The sandwich itself is pretty standard fare, consisting of two slices of cherrywood-smoked Canadian bacon, an egg patty and reduced-fat white cheddar on a gluten-free roll. The company website uses boldface type to tout the "gluten-free"-ness of the new offering, noting that the sandwich uses a "gluten-free roll," is "prepared in a certified gluten-free environment," and sealed "in its own oven-safe parchment bag to avoid any cross-contamination." Sounds good, so far, perhaps even safe for celiacs. But then there's this little disclaimer at the bottom of the page saying that Starbucks "cannot guarantee that any of our products are free from allergens (including dairy, eggs, soy, tree nuts, wheat and others) as we use shared equipment to store, prepare and serve them." Wheat? This product may contain wheat? Wheat contains gluten. Things that contain wheat are not gluten-free, and usually cannot be labeled as such. So, what's the deal? Is the sandwich gluten-free or not? Is this a bit like when Pizza Hut offered a gluten-free pizza crust, but wouldn't guarantee a gluten-free pizza? How much wiggle room is built into Starbucks' disclaimer? The questions are basic ones. Is the product gluten-free? Is it safe for people with celiac disease, or not? If it is, then Starbucks has been unclear in declaring the suitability of their product for people with celiac disease. If not, then Starbucks has been equally unclear in declaring the unsuitability of their product for people with celiac disease. Also, if the company can't guarantee a gluten-free product, and won't recommend it for people with celiac disease, then who is this product for? The Starbucks website features lots of talk about the "gluten-free," aspects of the product, and the serving process, but there is no language stating that the sandwich, as served is "under 20ppm" gluten, which is the FDA standard for advertising package goods as "gluten-free." There is no claim that the product is safe for people with celiac disease. The Starbucks Gluten-free Breakfast Sandwich sounds very much like something that many people in the celiac disease community might welcome…IF it's actually gluten-free. Let's hope it is. Let's hope this was just a mix-up by Starbucks, perhaps the result of an over-zealous legal department. Otherwise, it would seem that, without more clarity, people with celiac disease could be confused or mislead by the claims, and maybe influenced by the ubiquitousness of Starbucks and their promotional campaign into trying something that might harm them. Celiac.com is reaching out to Starbucks for comment. We look forward to sharing their reply. Until it becomes clear that this product is actually gluten-free, and suitable for everyone, Celiac.com urges celiac sufferers to use caution, and to follow the story here for more updates. Source: Starbucks.com
  5. Celiac.com 11/06/2017 - Gluten-free Starbucks patrons in South Florida just got a nice piece of news. Starbucks is now offering a new, gluten-free cupcake to select South Florida locations. Oh, and the cupcake also happens to be vegan. To deliver their newest gluten-free offering, Starbucks has partnered with Miami-based bakery, Bunnie Cakes, who will provide their locally made, gluten-free, and vegan passionfruit cupcakes to select Starbucks stores in the area. Bunnie Cakes has been a labor of love since owner, Mariana Cortez, first began making gluten-free and treats for two of her children, who have celiac disease. The small, nearly bite-sized cupcakes have been called 'cute,' but they have gained a popular following among gluten-free eaters, and are regarded by many as "one of the best cupcakes in Miami," Starbucks wrote in a press release. Bunnie Cakes' products have also attracted a bit of national attention, such as being named as a winner on Food Network's Cupcake Wars. If you live in South Florida, or if you find yourself visiting, and happen find yourself enjoying Bunnie Cakes gluten-free cupcakes, either at Starbucks, or at the bakery itself, we encourage you to share your experience in our comments section. Read more at onegreenplanet.org.
  6. I know they're brand new, but has anyone with Celiac tried the gluten-free Breakfast Sandwiches with Canadian Bacon that Starbucks just introduced? I asked at my local Sbux this morning and while they are packaged on arrival, they seem to be heated up on a new sheet of paper but in a shared oven (microwave?) The barista suggested maybe taking it up to my office and microwaving it there, but couldn't confirm that their 'oven' is a microwave vs. something else. The Starbucks press release says there's no risk of cross-contamination but I know better than to risk it without checking in with you smart folks. A good, readily accessible breakfast sandwich would be life-changing for me ;-)
  7. Celiac.com 09/27/2016 - After repeated shareholder requests, and a public admission from the CEO that the company had "really screwed up the gluten free stuff," Starbucks is announcing an expansion gluten-free and other specialty options. Until now, Starbucks has relied heavily on packaged foods to meet the rising demand for gluten-free food raises. As part of a new effort to change that, the company recently released its latest offering, the organic gluten-free, vegan, kosher chickpea puff called Hippeas, which is currently available in white cheddar and fajita flavors. Over the years, numerous shareholders have demanded that Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz add more food options for people who are either allergic to gluten or choose to eat gluten-free. At the 2015 shareholder meeting, Schultz said the company had plans to address the gluten-free issue because it represents a "big opportunity." He added that, to that point, the company had "really screwed up the gluten free stuff." Some gluten-free options are available regionally at various Starbucks, such as the Marshmallow Dream bar and the Kind Bars, but there has been little in the way of quality gluten-free options that are local, aritisanal, etc. "Items in our pastry case can be subject to cross contamination and we use shared equipment," Starbucks spokeswoman Erin Schaeffer said in an email response to questions. "So adding gluten-free options to our broader food portfolio has posed a challenge that we continue to explore." The market for packaged gluten-free foods is estimated at more than $3 billion and is continuing to grow. Last year, Starbucks launched the Retail Brand Partnership team, which is tasked with finding packaged goods that satisfy various dietary specialty needs. Read more in Bizjournals.com.
  8. I remember reading many times that some Tazo teas have gluten in them - namely the Green Ginger, Tazo Honeybush, Lemon Ginger, and Tea Lemonade. I decided to check with the company because it looked like all old information and sure enough, they have revised their statement on gluten. Here is what I received from their Customer Care dept. Looks like they have removed the potential gluten in all tea flavors. Thank you so much for taking the time to contact Tazo. Thank you for your inquiry. None of our teas contain wheat or barley in them. Some of our teas do continue corn or corn derived products but no wheat or barley. While some glues do contain wheat and/or animal products, no glue of any kind is used to seal Tazo filterbags. They are stapled; so there is no glue present. Tazo Filterbag manufacturing plants have allergen control standards in place. While there is always risk of cross-contamination with gluten containing products in the retail setting, the actual dry filterbag components should not contain any gluten.
  9. Hi, My dietitian has once told me that the hot coffee cups (that are served in Starbucks etc) contain gluten in their edges. Do you have problems with it? I keep ordering coffee in mugs ever since, but I can not have coffee to go obviously. I have been diagnosed celiac 5-6 months ago insidentally and I do not have symptoms, so I am afraid I am getting glutened without knowing.
  10. Can anyone help me sort through the mass of opinions on coffees. From what I am reading starbuck, gevallia and maxwell house may have trace amount despite their being 100% coffee. But I read other posts where folks say some of the above are garanteed gluten-free I feel like something is dosing me and I drink up so a 8-10 cup pot a day some days so even trace amoutns would be my best guess for whats making me feel sick despite being gluten-free now. I haven't toasted bread yet, or shared cuttign boards. The only thing I have shared was pots after being cleaned in soap and hot water, so coffee seems to be the most viable culprit of my continued issues I would appreciate any thoguhts or information on how to find a brand that is a safe gluten-free brand. I really really prefer dark roasts but of course I prefer not having fog on the brain and feeling weak and dragging all day or being glued to the bathroom Thanks in advance. I must say it has been such a relief to find so many resources such as this on the web these last couple months. I can't imagine how hard it must have been for some of you veterans before technology.
  11. MissHaberdasher

    Starbucks?!

    Hey everyone, I recently got a job as a barista at a Barnes and Noble Cafe. We serve Starbucks products (I call us a pretend Starbucks... same thing, really). This has fed my addiction to coffee, but unfortunately, I've been glutened. I have a few theories as to what it is, please let me know what your thoughts are! 1. I may have missed hidden glutens in the different syrups - caramel color has never put me off before, but I've never had it on an almost daily basis before. 2. Perhaps I'm developing an intolerance to soy? 3. Maybe, when I do the dishes, some gluten from pastries and dairy products splash back to my face and/or vaporize and end up in my body? We have a high-powered sprayer jet...thing... and no matter what I do it ALWAYS ends up splashing my face. 4. I read somewhere that gluten intolerant folks will actually react to coffee itself. Thoughts? (http://drclark.typepad.com/dr_david_clark/2011/09/coffee-and-gluten-sensitivity-surprising-news.html) 5. I handle all of the pastries and bake all of the products - even though I use gloves, could this be problematic? I'm not NORMALLY highly sensitive to gluten - meaning, if I scrub a pan that has held normal pasta really REALLY WELL, I'll walk away feeling only slightly off, almost to a point where I don't notice it. Or, I can risk eating products with caramel color because I can't tell the difference... This might have changed, I don't know. I'm eliminating all soy products and all flavored syrups with caramel color for the next two weeks to find out if that's the cause. Has anyone else had this experience? Thanks!
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