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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/27/2010 - Many businesses contact us here at Celiac.com, wanting to know how to start a gluten-free business. There are many important things to consider before you open your gluten-free business to celiac and gluten intolerant customers. The following information is intended to help those looking to comply with celiac standards of gluten-free food. Start-Up: To begin, it is important to take take inventory of celiac contamination requirements. Will your gluten-free business also sell gluten-containing foods? If so, cross contamination will be an issue. If your company will be solely a gluten-free accommodating business, it will make your challenges fewer, but there are other important factors to consider such as contamination, suppliers and certifications. Before you begin your journey into providing gluten-free products, it is important to think like a celiac. Contamination & Cross-Contamination: Cross-contamination occurs when a gluten-free product comes into contact with other gluten based products. Cross contamination can occur in a variety of ways, but it usually begins where food is prepared and packaged, such as with the supplier or the manufacturer. However, cross-contamination can occur from other sources as well. If you plan to sell gluten containing pizza and gluten-free pizza, for example, then you will have an entirely new set of concerns. If you make the pizza dough in-house, there is a very good chance that gluten flour will permeate in the air for hours after using, coating your surfaces and creating a health hazard for the gluten-free folks. And if you bake the gluten and non-gluten pizza's in the same oven, then you will also need to take that into consideration, as that is also a source of cross-contamination and can render your gluten-free pizza inedible for sensitive celiacs. If your gluten-free food is stored in the same place as the gluten-containing food, you may have also a health hazard on your hands. Basically, it's a good rule of thumb to follow the celiac guidelines set for keeping a gluten-free kitchen. There are many considerations to take into account when supplying gluten-free food and while keeping a pristine business will be your best friend, sometimes even that isn't enough. Suppliers: Suppliers are a very important factor when starting a gluten-free business. It is important to research the product sources before using an ingredient source. If an ingredient source is contaminated by gluten, then your products could also be contaminated by gluten. So if you are looking to buy gluten-free rice flour for example, the reliability of your rice flour to be gluten-free will depend greatly on your supplier. It is important to carefully research the product supplier before using them. There is nothing worse than buying large quantities of food labeled “gluten-free” that actually contain gluten. Remember, it is up to a product's manufacturer to guarantee that their products are gluten-free. They must research their ingredient suppliers, and follow-up with them periodically, as sources and ingredients can change at anytime without notice. Gluten-Free Certification: If you plan to operate a gluten-free business then getting your products certified gluten-free is the best way to go. Not all gluten-free certifications are created equal. There are various gluten-free labels ranging from legitimate to not so legitimate, so it is important to research the most reliable, and best gluten-free label for your products. Getting your product 'gluten-free' certified will put your consumers at ease and increase your sales. It will also put you at ease knowing that you are providing the best gluten-free product you possibly can.
  2. Years before I developed full gluten intolerance (probably celiac) while I could enjoy many wheat products, I would get odd, unpleasant reactions to Ritz crackers and Cheerios. I did not think much of it and generally just avoided those products. I periodically retried them thinking it was a temporary problem with the product. I subsequently developed the same problem with any wheat and gluten product. Has anyone else noticed a similar prodrome to any food products?
  3. Celiac.com 04/19/2012 - A team of researchers examined the effect of corn, rice and amaranth gluten-free sourdoughs on the release of nitric oxide (NO) and synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines by duodenal mucosa biopsies of eight celiac disease patients. The research team included Maria Calasso, Olimpia Vincentini, Francesco Valitutti, Cristina Felli, Marco Gobbetti and Raffaella Di Cagno. The team used select lactic acid bacteria as starters for making corn, rice and amaranth sourdoughs. From these gluten-free sourdough matrices, they made chemically acidified doughs, without bacterial starters, and doughs started with baker’s yeast alone. They produced pepsin-trypsin (PT) digests from all sourdoughs and doughs, and used the results to the measure the recovery of biopsy specimens from eight celiac disease patients at diagnosis. They also measured the release of NO and the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ (IFN-γ). They found that lactic acid bacteria acidified and grew well (ca. log 9.0 CFU/g) during fermentation, showing strong proteolysis on all gluten-free samples. They also found that duodenal biopsy specimens still released NO and IFN-γ when subjected to treatments with basal medium (control), PT-digest from chemically acidified doughs and PT-digest from doughs fermented with baker’s yeast alone. In fact, in every case, biopsy specimens treated with PT-digests from all gluten-free matrices with sourdough fermentation substantially reduced NO release and IFN-γ synthesis. From their results, the team concludes that sourdough fermentation might offer an easy and effective way to speed recovery from intestinal inflammation of celiac patients beginning a gluten-free diet. Source: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NUTRITION. DOI: 10.1007/s00394-012-0303-y
  4. Hi, I'm 17 and have just started the gluten free diet. I am very excited to see results and just want to know; What were your earliest symptoms to go away and how long did it take?
  5. Celiac.com 03/13/2013 - To determine if the probiotic Bifidobacterium natren life start (NLS) strain might affect the treatment and clinical features of patients with untreated celiac disease, a team of researchers recently conducted an exploratory, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study on the effects of Bifidobacterium infantis natren life start super strain in active celiac disease. The research team included E. Smecuol, H.J. Hwang, E. Sugai, L. Corso, A.C. Cherñavsky, F.P. Bellavite, A. González, F. Vodánovich, M.L. Moreno, H. Vázquez, G. Lozano, S.Niveloni, R. Mazure, J. Meddings, E. Mauriño, and J.C. Bai. They are variously affiliated with the Small Intestinal Section of the Department of Medicine in the Department of Alimentation at the Hospital de Gastroenterología "Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo," the Department of Immunogenetics of the Hospital de Clínicas "José de San Martín" at the Universidad de Buenos Aires, the Consejo de Investigación en Salud, Ministerio de Salud in Ciudad de Buenos Aires, the Department of Gastroenterology at the Universidad del Salvador in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and the Gastrointestinal Research Group at the University of Calgary in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. For their study, the team enrolled 22 adult patients with two positive celiac disease-specific tests. Over a three week period, patients randomly received two capsules of either Bifidobacterium infantis natren life start strain super strain (Lifestart 2) (2×10 colony-forming units per capsule). All patients consumed at least 12 g of gluten per day for the duration of the test. In all, twelve patients received the bifidobacterium, while ten received the placebo. At the end of the trial, the team used biopsy to confirm celiac disease in all patients. The primary factor being measured was changes to intestinal permeability. The secondary factor was changes in symptoms and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale, and in immunologic indicators of inflammation. Neither treatment caused significant changes in abnormal baseline intestinal permeability. In contrast to patients receiving the placebo, patients who received B. infantis experienced significant improvements as measured by the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (P=0.0035 for indigestion; P=0.0483 for constipation; P=0.0586 for reflux). The administration of B. infantis was completely safe. Patients who received B. infantis showed lower ratios of IgA tTG and IgA DGP antibody (P=0.055 for IgA tTG and P=0.181 for IgA DGP). Patients who received B. infantis also had significantly higher levels of serum macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (P<0.04). The results indicate that B. infantis may alleviate symptoms in untreated celiac disease. The probiotic produced some immunologic changes, but did not change abnormal intestinal permeability. The researchers call for further study to confirm and/or expand these results. Source: J Clin Gastroenterol. 2013 Feb;47(2):139-47. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0b013e31827759ac.
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