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Found 3 results

  1. Celiac.com 08/01/2016 - If you are diagnosed with celiac disease, you have to completely avoid gluten for life. However, cutting out all gluten from your diet may seem quite daunting at first, but a gluten-free diet is the only remedy and treatment for this condition. Now you must be wondering what you can eat on a daily basis? Here are some tips to help you getting started with your gluten-free diet. Tip 1: Look for Healthy Food Items There are numerous food items which are naturally gluten-free. Stop worrying about the "off-limits" items, as there are plenty of healthy and gluten-free alternatives. These include the energetic ones such as meat, vegetables, fruits, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, dairy items, nuts, legumes and beans. Above all, you should always consider eating food items that are healthy, and will help you maintain your physical fitness and body tone, rather than unhealthy replacements for the items you miss. Tip 2: Avoid Eating Items Containing Gluten Wheat gluten is one of the staple food items and is enemy number one for people who are suffering from gluten sensitivity. You should avoid foods that contain any gluten. It is not just wheat that is harmful for those with celiac disease, harmful gluten is also present in barley, rye, bulgur, seitan, and many other foods in for form of additives and thickeners in things like chicken broth, salad dressings, malt vinegar, soy sauce, etc. However, not all grains need to be avoided, and you can eat foods made from corn, buckwheat, teff, amaranth, millet and quinoa, which are naturally gluten-free. Of course you need to be sure that you get uncontaminated versions, as some grains can be contaminated during processing. Tip 3: Make a Habit of Reading the Food Labels Now that you know that you must avoid gluten, it is time to take care of your diet. When going grocery shopping you should make a habit of reading the ingredient labels, which all foods should have on their labels. While reading it, you will get an idea whether or not the product is suitable for you or not. You should carefully look out for ingredients including rye, wheat, barley, or any ingredient containing gluten. If you find any of these ingredients, avoid purchasing them and opt for other alternatives. Tip 4: Be Vigilant When You Eat Out Having celiac disease and being on a gluten free diet, does not mean that you should avoid going to restaurants and eating out. You can eat out but you need to be careful with the food items that you choose to eat, and how you order your food. Try to stick with a gluten-free menu if they have one, or foods that you understand the basic preparation methods and ingredients, for example steamed vegetables and grilled meats. Above all be sure that you are sticking to your gluten-free diet to maintain your health and fitness. When there is no gluten-free menue it might make sense to avoid eating fried items and foods containing sauces, because they can be a source of hidden gluten. It is always wise to inform your chef beforehand about the dietary restrictions for a safe gluten-free eat-out. People with celiac disease can sometimes feel miserable due to their restricted diet, but they should not be sad because gluten-free meals can also be delicious and healthy, and often taste just as good as the foods that contain gluten. Now that you know these tips, we hope you will be able to get started with your gluten-free diet effectively. Sources: thestonesoup.com
  2. Years before I developed full gluten intolerance (probably celiac) while I could enjoy many wheat products, I would get odd, unpleasant reactions to Ritz crackers and Cheerios. I did not think much of it and generally just avoided those products. I periodically retried them thinking it was a temporary problem with the product. I subsequently developed the same problem with any wheat and gluten product. Has anyone else noticed a similar prodrome to any food products?
  3. Appl Environ Microbiol. 2004 Feb;70(2):1088-1096 Celiac.com 02/26/2004 - Please note that the sourdough bread used in this study is not your garden-variety sourdough bread, and as far as I know it is not commercially available. Even though this study had very promising results, it was conducted on a relatively small number of people, and larger studies need to be carried out before reaching any conclusions about the long-term safety of celiacs consuming this type of sourdough bread. -Scott Adams Researchers in Europe conducted a novel study which utilized a highly specialized sourdough lactobacilli containing peptidases that have the ability to hydrolyze Pro-rich peptides, including the 33-mer peptide, which is the main culprit in the immune response associated with celiac disease. The sourdough bread in the study was made from a dough mixture that contained 30% wheat flour and other nontoxic flours including oat, millet, and buckwheat, which was then started with the specialized lactobacilli. After 24 hours of fermentation all 33-mer peptides and low-molecular-mass, alcohol-soluble polypeptides were almost totally hydrolyzed. For the next step in the study the researchers extracted proteins fro the sourdough and used them to produce a "peptic-tryptic digest" for in vitro agglutination tests on human K 562 subclone cell. The agglutinating activity of the sourdough proteins was found to be 250 times higher that that of normal bakers-yeast or lactobacilli started breads. A double blind test was then conducted in which 17 celiac disease patients were given 2 grams of gluten-containing bread started with bakers yeast or lactobacilli. Thirteen of them showed distinct, negative changes in their intestinal permeability after eating the bread, and 4 of them did not show any negative effects. The specially prepared sourdough bread was then given to all 17 patients and none of them had intestinal permeability reactions that differed from their normal baseline values. The researchers conclude: "These results showed that a bread biotechnology that uses selected lactobacilli, nontoxic flours, and a long fermentation time is a novel tool for decreasing the level of gluten intolerance in humans."
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