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Found 6 results

  1. Celiac.com 12/12/2017 - Does a gluten-free diet have any effect on cardiovascular risk in people with celiac disease? Does it effect people without celiac disease? So far, both questions have remained unanswered. Recently, a team of researchers set out to conduct a systematic review to shed some light on the matter. The team was led by Michael D.E. Potter, MBBS (Hons), from the University of New Castle, Australia. The team focused their review on the "potential of the gluten-free diet to affect modifiable cardiovascular risk factors including weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugars," and to do this they searched for "studies which measured these risk factors in individuals before and after the institution of a gluten-free diet." In all, Potter and colleagues reviewed 27 studies that evaluated the effect of a gluten-free diet, as followed for a minimum of 6 months, on cardiovascular risk factors such as BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glycemia, hemoglobin A1c and serum lipids. Despite their efforts, they found no clear evidence that a gluten-free diet increases cardiovascular risk in celiac patients. They found no evidence that it increases heart disease risk in people without celiac disease. They really found nothing much at all. While the results varied across studies, and researchers did see changes in some cardiovascular risk factors, they say the data do not support a gluten-free diet for cardiovascular health in individuals without celiac disease. True, perhaps. But it's also true that the data neither support nor condemn a gluten-free diet in people without celiac disease. Unless and until researchers get some solid data from large groups and can make accurate, informative comparisons between those groups, it seems foolish for them to advocate or discourage a gluten-free diet in people without celiac disease. Source: Healio.com
  2. Celiac.com 10/02/2017 - For anyone following the efforts by ImmusanT to develop a vaccine for celiac disease, the company's recent presentations at the 2017 International Celiac Disease Symposium (ICDS) in New Delhi, India, were welcome news. Nexvax2® is a therapeutic vaccine intended to protect against the effects of gluten exposure while maintaining a gluten-free diet in HLA-DQ2.5+ patients with celiac disease. The company announced at ICDS 2017 that it has presented data showing the immunologic basis for the early clinical effects of gluten in celiac disease. Presented in two poster presentations and an oral presentation, the company says its data show that "early cytokine changes in blood following gluten ingestion could provide the basis for a new diagnostic for celiac disease in patients on a gluten free diet with an uncertain diagnosis," said Robert Anderson, MBChB, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer of ImmusanT. The company says its results are "significant" because celiac disease sufferers often adopt a gluten-free diet prior to being diagnosed by a doctor. This can cause problems and lead to unreliable or misleading results with current diagnostic tests. ImmusanT says that their data demonstrate that early changes in circulating cytokines after a single gluten exposure may offer a clinical way to assess celiac disease activity. The company says that the data, along with the potential to differentiate between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) by assessing IL-2 levels, support the science behind targeted immunotherapies such as Nexvax2®. Read more at BusinessWire.com
  3. Celiac.com 06/08/2007 - In the first study, doctors Ibrahim S. Alghafeer, and Leonard H. Sigal conducted a routine gastroenterology follow-up of 200 adult celiac patients. Arthritis was present in 52 of 200 patients, or 26%. The arthritis was peripheral in 19 patients, Axial in 15 patients, and an overlap of the two in 18 patients. The doctors found that joint disease was much less common in those patients who were following a gluten-free diet (1). A related study by Usai, et al found that 63% of patients with celiac disease show axial joint inflammation (2). In that study, doctors conducted bone scintigraphy using 99m Tc methylene diphosphonate. 14 of these patients (65%) signs compatible with sacroiliitis. 11 of the 14 suffered from low back pain. In five of the 11 patients with low back pain, scintigraphy was negative. Sacroiliac radiographs were conducted on 4 of those 5 patients, and all of them were shown to have bilateral sacroiliitis. One patient had rheumatoid arthritis, but all patients in the studied showed negative HLA-B27 results. Rheumatoid Symptoms Less Common in Celiacs on Gluten-free Diet In patients with gluten enteropathy, symptoms of arthritis and other rheumatic complaints are common, and the associated clinical abnormalities routinely show improvement on a gluten-free diet. (3,4,5) In 9 of 74 patients with spondyloarthropathies, results show increased level of antigliadin antibodies, with 1 patient showing elevated antiendomysium antibodies and biopsy proven celiac disease (6). These results show that antiendomysial antibody testing is recommended as a screening tool in patients with suspected gluten enteropathy. Another study found that 3.3% of sprue patients had Sjogrens syndrome (7). 55 celiac patients who were tested for serial bone density showed osteoporosis in 50% of men and 47% of women. These findings confirm that celiac disease was an independent risk factor for osteoporosis (8). Bulletin on the Rheumatic Diseases, Volume 51, Number 2. Usai P. Adult celiac disease is frequently associated with sacroiliitis. Dig Dis Sci 1995;40:1906-8 Lubrano E, Ciacci C, Ames PR, et al. The arthritis of celiac disease: prevalence and pattern in 200 adult patients. Br J Rheumatol 1996;35:1314-8. Usai P. Adult celiac disease is frequently associated with sacroiliitis. Dig Dis Sci 1995;40:1906-8. Bagnato gluten-free, Quattrocchi E, Gulli S, et al. Unusual polyarthritis as a unique clinical manifestation of celiac disease. Rheumatol Int 2000;20:29-30. Borg AA, Dawes PT, Swan CH, Hothersall TE. Persistent monoarthritis and occult celiac disease. Postgrad Med J 1994;70:51-3. Collin P, Korpela M, Hallstrom O, et al. Rheumatic complaints as a presenting symptom in patients with celiac disease. Scan J Rheumatol 1992;21:20-3. Kallilorm R, Uibo O, Uibo R. Clin Rheumatol 2000;19:118-22. health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.
  4. For the first time, researchers at the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center will use mouse model research to explore root causes of celiac disease, test new therapies, and explore new targets for treatment. Celiac disease is the most common genetic autoimmune disease in the world. Celiac disease affects approximately three million Americans, but only three out of every one hundred people with celiac disease have been diagnosed. At least ninety-seven percent of people with celiac disease undiagnosed. Untreated celiac disease can lead to osteoporosis, infertility, neurological conditions, and cancer. Moreover, people with celiac disease have a substantially higher risk of developing other autoimmune diseases, especially Type-1 diabetes. Bana Jabri, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of Chicago Medical Center, and a leading celiac disease researcher, will create the new mouse model with the goal of identifying new remedies and preventive treatments targeted at children of families with a history of celiac disease. The studies will also investigate events that contribute to the development of Type-1 diabetes. “There is a critical need to provide the proper resources to those who suffer from celiac disease,” said Stefano Guandalini, M.D., professor of pediatrics at the University of Chicago Medical Center, founder and medical director of the Celiac Disease Center. “This commitment from University of Chicago Celiac Advisory Board reaffirms the Celiac Disease Center’s mission to bring cutting edge research, education and encouragement to those affected by the disease”. Dr. Jabri believes that mouse models are central to understanding the underlying causes of celiac disease, its connection to other autoimmune diseases. The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center is a 501-c3 non-profit organization, completely funded by donor contributions, and committed to improving the care, diagnosis and awareness of celiac disease. The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center also provides necessary infrastructure and support for cutting-edge celiac research, including investigations into structure of gluten peptides and the mechanisms by which gluten modifies self molecules. Mouse model studies show promise in helping researchers to better and more quickly unlock the secrets of celiac disease. For more information please visit: www.celiacdisease.net
  5. The following are excerpts from a lecture given by Dr Lionel Fry at the 1984 AGM in London. Dr. Fry is a consultant dermatologist. The lecture is entitled: Recent Studies in Dermatitis Herpetiformis. ..we have looked at the records of 78 patients who have been attending our special DH clinic. The length of follow-up of these patients has ranged from 3 to 14 years (mean 7.4). All patients were offered a gluten-free diet as part of their treatment. However, only 42 patients have taken the diet......in only 23 patients was the diet absolutely strict, in another 17 there had been very occasional, but unintentional gluten intake, and in 2 there had been occasional but intentional intake. When these three groups of patients are compared it has been found that of the 23 patients taking a strict diet, 22 (96%) were able to stop drugs compared to 8 (47%) of 17 patients who had occasional but unintentional gluten (the 2 occasional but intentional gluten eaters could not stop drugs)........One of the most significant points to have emerged from our study is the time it takes with a gluten free diet before patients may reduce the dose of their drugs to control the rash, and eventually cease to need drugs. The mean time before there was a reduction in the dose of dapsone was 4-30 months (mean 8), and 6-108 months (mean 29 ) before the drugs were no longer required. These times were dependent on the strictness of the diet. ....In the past many doctors have been unaware that it has taken so long before the drugs could be reduced or stopped and this led to a situation where it was thought that the rash was not due to gluten.......Twelve of our patients agreed to take gluten again to see if their rash returned. These 12 patients had been on a gluten free diet for periods ranging from 3-12 years (mean 7.5). In 11 of the 12 patients the rash recurred in times ranging from 2-36 weeks (mean 12). It could be argued that in the patient whose rash did not recur had undergone spontaneous remission........ (sections of the text of a talk by Dr. Lionel Fry, Consultant Dermatologist, St Marys Hospital, London W2).
  6. AU- Fallstrom SP; Kristiansson B; Ryd W JN- Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand [A]; 89 (6) p431-8 PY- Nov 1981 AB- Eighty-one children aged 4-18 months with unsatisfactory weight gain were investigated for organic diseases; the investigation included small-intestinal biopsy. Sixteen had total villous atrophy, in most cases due to gluten intolerance. Transient disease, e.g. cows milk protein intolerance, was probable in 7 children with subtotal atrophy. In 18 children the only abnormal finding was an increased number of inflammatory cells in the mucosa, a finding which was probably of no clinical significance. Planimetric measurement showed good agreement between the mucosal surface/volume ratio and an ordinary histological grouping of the mucosa. A significant correlation was found between the rate of weight gain during the period preceding investigation and mucosal surface/volume ratio.