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Found 4 results

  1. Celiac.com 12/15/2017 - Is this some kind of cruel trick? As Subway makes a major announcement touting a gluten-free bread option in its restaurants across Canada, it offers a small disclaimer that the gluten's only going away for a limited time. For a limited time? What? Subway is the first fast food restaurant to carry gluten-free bread throughout Canada, but it will only do so "for a limited time?" You got that right. In plain text, clear as day, the Subway press release says that the company will offer its gluten-free option across Canada "for a limited time." Does that mean it will be permanent in some places and not in others? Does it mean they will bring the entire promotion to an end at some point? What does this mean for customers? What does it mean for people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance? In the short term, I guess it means get you're Canadian, and gluten-free, and looking for a gluten-free sub, Subway has you covered. For how long exactly? Stay tuned. Read more at: Restobiz.ca
  2. Celiac.com 08/14/2015 – Recently I took a last minute, end of Summer road trip with my family and on one of our pit stops I was delighted to discover the often rumored, highly elusive and possibly "Holy Grail" of gluten-free food: Subway's gluten-free sub rolls! Yes, I am here to tell you that they do indeed exist, even though I almost couldn't believe it even when I saw them—but there they were...a whole stack of six inch long gluten-free Subway rolls—sitting right in front of me in tidy, individually wrapped cellophane packages. I had to rub my eyes and look twice to make sure that I wasn't dreaming because I, like many people, believed that Subway had discontinued them after a temporary Oregon-only trial run, and had decided against a permanent gluten-free roll out. Apparently though, in Oregon at least (and perhaps in other states?), they are still going strong many months after their rumored demise. To top this off, they even offered a gluten-free brownie for dessert! Rather than getting stuck with a chopped Subway salad again I was finally able to order a real submarine sandwich—just like everyone else. So, I immediately honed in on an old favorite and decided to try their Spicy Italian sub on a gluten-free roll. What...no bewildered look on their faces when I asked for gluten-free? They seemed to know exactly what I wanted, and the employee who prepared my sandwich seemed to follow a carefully prepared script—she first cleaned off the prep counter, then changed into a new pair of clean gloves, and finally pulled out a new, clean sheet of paper onto which she set the packaged roll. The roll was pre-cut, thus she didn't have to use the bread knife to cut it, which was likely contaminated. While making the sandwich I was offered the option of having it toasted (some sensitive celiacs may want to skip the toaster oven part), and I noticed that when she toasted mine she made sure that it went into the oven solo, so that it would not touch other sandwiches (it was also on its original sheet of clean paper when it went in). At this point you are probably wondering how it tasted, right? It was simply fantastic! Why can't other companies make gluten-free bread taste like this? It was soft, strong and slightly chewy. It wasn't at all dry, and seemed very fresh. My wife wanted me to ask them if they were sold separately so that I could take some home with me, which I didn't do, but you get the idea—they were really good and tasted very fresh. I was so excited about the prospect of being able to once again eat Subway sandwiches that I ended up stopping at Subway several times during our road trip. Each time I visited a Subway in Oregon I noticed that other people were also ordering or eating gluten-free subs, and in each case the staff seemed to follow their gluten-free script perfectly. It is difficult to estimate the exact ratio of gluten-free customers from such a small sampling, but it seemed to me that around 10-20% of total visitors ordered the gluten-free roll. Most companies would do almost anything to grow their business by 10-20%, but in this case the opposite could be the case—businesses should be willing to offer gluten-free options so they don't lose 10-20% of their business! I certainly hope that Subway's Oregon test bed is going well, and that Subway has learned that offering gluten-free sub rolls is great for business. And now for the $64,000 question: Will Subway roll out their gluten-free rolls to other states, and if so, when? It's time for Subway to share the gluten-free love beyond just Oregon! Of course with the P.F. Chang's litigation still ongoing, they are likely now in a holding pattern to see how that case turns out. Have you seen gluten-free Subway rolls outside of Oregon? Please let us know below.
  3. Celiac.com 03/09/2012 - Subway stores in Oregon are in the process of rolling out gluten-free sandwich buns and gluten-free brownies as regular menu items statewide, according to Subway spokesperson Cathie Ericson. For millions of Americans who avoid gluten, due to celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, eating out can be a constant challenge. Having easy access to a safe, tasty, low-cost gluten-free sandwich is like the Holy Grail for some of those folks. For many, being able to grab a gluten-free Subway sandwich would be a major step toward vanquishing the challenges of eating gluten-free. Subway understands that being gluten-free "…really cuts down on fast-casual dining options, particularly sandwiches,” said Michele Shelley, Subway board member and owner. Many people were excited to read about Subway's early testing of gluten-free products in selected areas. Many were equally excited to hear about Subway's commitment to getting their gluten-free sandwich offerings right, from start to finish. For example, Subway’s wheat-free sandwich rolls and brownies are produced in a dedicated gluten-free facility and are individually packaged. Subway staffers are trained to prevent cross-contamination during the sandwich-making process. Moreover, a single employee will prepare a gluten-free sandwich order from start to finish. Other features to Subway's gluten-free process include single-use knives and eliminating contact between traditional sandwich rolls and other ingredients including meat, cheese and vegetables. Oregon is one of a handful of states where Subway first tested gluten-free products in selected areas. The current statewide roll out in Oregon comes after a successful test in Bend and Portland, Subway restaurants, and seems to signal Subway's desire to offer gluten-free menus to diners. “Subway is known for being a leader in healthy fare, and we are excited to embrace these gluten-free menu items for those who can benefit from them,” Shelley told reporters. Source: http://community.statesmanjournal.com/blogs/menumatters/2012/01/27/oregon-subways-add-gluten-free-menu-options/
  4. Celiac.com 09/08/2011 - What started in January as a quiet and limited campaign by Subway to test gluten-free rolls and brownies in the Dallas market, then spread to a few Portland outlets, has rapidly grown into a plan to include more than 500 stores. So far, Subway has been "very pleased" with its tests, and has gotten an "overwhelmingly positive" response from customers. Customers have deluged Subway with requests for a wider roll out, but the company remains committed to getting the process right from R&D to supply to in-store training, all with an eye toward customer satisfaction, says Mark Christiano, Subway's Baking Specialist in the R&D Department. To Subway's credit, they are eager to meet their customers' demands, but cautious to get the entire process right. From product quality to preparation and customer satisfaction, Subway seems committed to getting it right. Subway does plan to expand both the gluten-free tests, and, eventually, incorporate gluten-free options into their menus, but the process will be slow and meticulous, according to Christiano. "We will take our time with this and make sure we deliver these products to the consumer the right way. If it was easy to do, everyone would have gluten-free available. Obviously it's not," he said. Still, rolling out gluten-free bread represents a huge opportunity for Subway. The National Restaurant Association listed gluten-free among the top five culinary themes for 2011. A majority of that market growth will come from the U.S. food service industry, which is expected to grow by more than $500 million by 2014. Even though customers may clamor for more gluten-free offerings, it is important that companies not just chase a dollar, but that they deliver quality gluten-free service that matches their gluten-free product. For their part, Subway is to be commended for putting such a serious amount of R&D into their gluten-free offerings. Their effort to provide both a quality product and to deliver that product consistently and with an eye toward customer satisfaction sets the bar for how to go about it. "(Gluten intolerance) doesn't impact a large mass of people. We're not judging these tests on sales, but instead on what we're able to do for a handful of our customers and their feedback," Kevin Kane, manager of public relations for Subway said. "It's not a money making thing; it's just the right thing to do." As Subway's efforts begin to pan out, look for more gluten-free offerings at your local outlet. Just the small trial of gluten-free rolls and brownies in Dallas offered logistical challenges. Christiano said the company spent about three years in development, followed by extensive training to make sure everyone was on board. The company went as far as working with an undisclosed supplier using a recently purchased gluten-free facility. Beyond the R&D and supply chain efforts to deliver quality raw materials, Subway has taken a great deal of time to design and implement a comprehensive in-store training program that will help them deliver a consistently high-quality and truly gluten-free "Having these items on the menu changes the entire way of doing things. It needs to be taken very seriously. The methods of handling this food have to be followed to a T," Christiano said. This includes extensive instructions, presentations and demonstrations, as well as monthly meetings to reinforce the process. Under Subway's new guidelines, whenever a customer orders a gluten-free roll or brownie, the line staff will wipe down the entire counter of any crumbs. They will then wash their hands and change their gloves. The gluten-free rolls and brownies are pre-packaged on fresh deli paper, and the staff use a single-use, pre-packaged knife for cutting. Each gluten-free sandwich will be made and delivered from order to point-of-sale by the same person, as opposed to being passed down the line in the traditional Subway format. Customers can watch the process from beginning to end. Most importantly, "If they don't like what they see, they can start it over. It's important that our customers feel comfortable and safe," Christiano said. "Nobody is going to die from this, but people get very sick if it's not done right. We want to provide them with a place to eat where they don't have to worry about that." Rather than just jumping on the gluten-free band-wagon, it sounds like Subway has committed to delivering a quality gluten-free experience from start to finish. Stay tuned to learn about their ongoing gluten-free product trials and their efforts to expand those offerings throughout their chain. Source: http://www.qsrweb.com/article/183399/Subway-expands-gluten-free-test
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