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Found 23 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/31/2018 - Using funds from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Canada Research Chairs Program, researcher Charlene Elliott, PhD, of the Department of Communication, Media, and Film, University of Calgary recently set out to assess the nutritional quality of gluten-free products specifically marketed for children. For her assessment, Elliott bought child-targeted gluten-free food products from two major supermarket chains in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Elliott used the Pan American Health Organization Nutrient Profile Model to compare the nutritional quality of products labeled gluten-free with those not so labeled. A secondary analysis compared the nutritional profile of child-targeted gluten-free products to their non-gluten-free “equivalents.” Elliott’s analysis showed that child-targeted gluten-free products generally had lower amounts of sodium, total fat, and saturated fat, However, those same foods also had less protein and about the same amount of calories from sugar as child-targeted products without a gluten-free claim. According to the Pan American Health Organization criteria, both gluten-free products and "regular" products designed for children can be classified as having poor nutritional quality (88% vs 97%). Compared to their non-gluten-free equivalents, products with a gluten-free claim had similarly high sugar levels, (79% vs 81%). So, the big picture is that gluten-free supermarket foods targeted at children are generally less nutritious than their non-gluten-free counterparts, and both types have alarmingly high sugar content. A gluten-free label is no guarantee of healthier, more nutritious food for kids, and it’s a mistake for parents to buy gluten-free products believing they are healthier than their non-gluten-free equals. The evidence shows that is simply not true. The takeaway here seems to be that, gluten-free or not, supermarket foods aimed at children are generally poor in nutrition and loaded with sugar, and parents should choose wisely when buying food for their children. Source: Pediatrics, July 2018
  2. Celiac.com 02/13/2018 - It is perhaps unsurprising that processed gluten-free foods are less nutritious than their gluten-containing counterparts. We've had data showing gluten-free foods to be high in sugar. We've had studies that show us they contain more salt. And now, for the trifecta, we have a recent study that shows us they contain more fat, sugar and salt. A study by the University of Hertfordshire surveyed more than 1,700 products from five UK supermarket chains and found that gluten-free foods have more fat, salt and sugar than their gluten-including counterparts, despite consumer perception that they "healthier" options. Except for crackers, every gluten-free food in the survey had more saturated fat, sugar and salt than non-gluten-free counterparts. On average for gluten-free brown bread and white bread had more than double the fat of regular breads. Gluten-free products also had significantly lower protein content than their gluten-containing equivalents, and were generally lower in ï¬ber and protein. Gluten-free products were also more likely to break the budget. On average, gluten-free products were also more than 1½ times more expensive than their counterparts, while gluten-free brown and white bread and gluten-free white and wholegrain flour sold at more than four times the price of comparable regular breads, on average. Overall, gluten-free foods are likely to be less nutritious and more expensive than their non-gluten-free counterparts. Basically, people on a gluten-free diet need to be extra careful about getting nutritious food. Simply substituting gluten-free versions of a a standard non-gluten-free diet likely means more fat, sugar and salt in your diet, along with less fiber. If you don't have a medically diagnosed reason for avoiding gluten, then be mindful about four food choices.
  3. Wanted to thank you all here at the forum for your messages, in the course of past two years it has been of much help and encouragement for me to read it and to know that I'm not alone in what I have been going through. I'd like to share my story in case somebody would get any benefit from reading it and in case there is anybody who can suggest something... I got first problems in 2009 when my fingertips started cracking all the time - deep cracks, bleeding, painful, etc. a continuous vicious circle. I just lived with it, it was manageable. I saw a few doctors, they said it was dishydrosis and that was it. In 2012 or so I got first eczema on my right hand little finger that then went on to grow and spread steadily during the following years and ended up to cover my entire right hand palm and moved on to my left hand little finger. At the end of 2015 I experienced first major problems that forced me to go on a strict diet (I saw an article in the internet that explained such eczemas by candida overgrowth). I stayed on that candida diet for something like two months and got a complete relief from all symptoms. The symptoms were overall fatigue, skin peeling off on my forehead, further growth of eczema on my hand, terrible itch and pain becuse of the eczema (I remember dropping on the floor in tears because of the agonising pain), and the last drop was hair loss... That diet helped and I now knew that my problem could be managed. I started reading stuff online trying to figure the connection and what was actually wrong with me. I did some lab tests, I did not have candida, I actually did not have any problems, all lab tests came back clear. I spent 2016 staying on diet on and off, balancing between flareups. I gradually started getting bloating episodes that lasted up to a week with certain discomfort breathing, walking, etc. Through experiments I figured that certain products made me feel worse and made the eczema worse. First was gluten. Avoiding gluten really helped. I could eat gluten one-two times but after several times I had a full flare up (no noticeable stomach problems though), so I started cutting down on gluten. Then soya joined the blacklisted gluten. And then came the spring of 2017 that I will never forget. I am attaching three photos to show what my hand was like. I could hardly use my hand, it would swell, burn, itch, pain. I started getting spots of eczema all over the my hand, spreading on to my left hand and it got really out of control spreading too fast. I tried going to doctors again, tried taking their medicines, all to no avail. Returning to diet and finally cutting out lactose removed the agony within two weeks. So, here I am now - intolerant to gluten, soya, nuts, any forms of sugar (including fruits), lactose. On top of that I am vegetarian (well, now a forced vegan). The reason why I am writing here is although I am strict with gluten I still get some (milder) flareups that are caused by even smallest amount of anything that's off the "diet" things. I can get a some flareup by cleaning some dusty drawers, by sleeping on a bed with dusty floor undernearth, by using spice mix that obviously has something wrong mixed in it, well and of course by eating something wrong when I get weak (and stupid).... Just to give you an idea, when I go to a store I cannot buy any snack at all that would be safe for me. All food that I take has to come from my kitchen and my pots... I have stuck to absolute diet for 3 months but within a week after I started adding some food like fruits or nuts to see if I was still intolerant to it, but I again get back to having problems... I have tried getting tested for allergy (nothing), for stomach problems (nothing), ultrasounds (nothing), blood test for clieac (nothing). Doctors here do not know the cause and do not get concerned also (the doctors just say oh if you feel you cannot take certain foods, then don't take them - duh, but when the list of those tihngs is that long?). Stomach biopsy is not done in my country (unless the patient is dying I guess). The only medicine that I take that helps me is an absorbent that is supposed to take out allergens out of the guts and is taken during poisoning (someting similar to activated charcoal). I took antihistamines almost every day in spring 2017 and I ended up always getting too drowsy for one-two days (even from the non-drowsy ones), so I have stopped taking them. The reason why I am writing all this and why I'm happy you have read till the end is that I feel disheartened and it is very hard for me to actually come to terms with this kind of diet especially because all lab tests come out clear and objectively there is no proof that I do have any allergies or intolerances or stomach problems. I'd appreciate to hear you take to it and perhaps some advice...
  4. I have been using the same sugar cookie recipe for 35 years. It is the only one my family knows. Now two of us have Celiac Disease and I'd love advice on how to adjust the baking powder, adding xanthan gum, etc. to make it as close as possible. I've already made a batch of America's Test Kitchen's Gluten Free All Purpose Flour Blend, but I also have some King Arthur All Purpose and Bobs Red Mill 1 for 1 in my cupboard. I'm new to gluten-free baking and never tried to adapt anything yet. I should also point out that I am brand new to using forums/chat rooms! This is the recipe I've used forever: http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/my_favorite_christmas_cookies_from_childhood_and_beyond/ I would appreciate any suggestions. Would love to do a test run while my kids are here for Thanksgiving. Thanks!!
  5. Hi guys. So I've been trying to adjust to my new diet but I've also been trying to watch my weight. I noticed lately that I'm having a lot of fresh fruits and veggies which is great but I notice my sugar intake is really high (98% which are natural sugars). I find it hard to know what types of snacks to have and meals that don't have a lot of sugar. Even if it's natural sugar I seem to be over doing it. I like to make smoothies with no sugar added so I do about half fruit and half veggies but I'm still getting in way too much sugar for the day. Any tips would be helpful!
  6. Celiac.com 12/21/2016 - Here's an easy, tasty recipe for those sugar-glazed holiday nuts that everyone's always going so crazy about. Ingredients: 2 egg whites 2 tablespoon water 1 pound pecan halves ½ pound cashews ½ pound almonds 2 cups white sugar 1½ teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, to taste Directions: Heat oven to 250 degrees F (120 degrees C). Grease one baking sheet. In a mixing bowl, whip together the egg whites and water until frothy. In a separate bowl, mix together sugar, salt, and cinnamon. Add nuts to egg whites, stir to coat the nuts evenly. Remove the nuts, and toss them in the sugar mixture until coated. Spread the nuts out on the prepared baking sheet. Bake at 250 degrees F (120 degrees C) for 1 hour. Stir every 15 minutes. Remove and place onto a wax paper, or paper towel-covered pan or plate. Allow to cool sufficiently before serving.
  7. Miranda Jade

    Is Bread Worse Than Sugar?

    Celiac.com 10/06/2016 - You do not need to be celiac to need to stay away from gluten. Wheat isn't just harmful to celiac or gluten-sensitive individuals. Did you know that just one slice of wheat bread raises one's blood sugar higher than 3 teaspoons of table sugar? That is equivalent to 12 grams of sugar! Talk about diabetes waiting to happen! I am very diligent in reading over even the gluten–free ingredients of products to ensure they are indeed gluten-free. I decided to start grabbing items off of the shelf to read the other listed ingredients as well. Wow, was I surprised! Sugar, high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, fructose etc.! Sweetener and especially sugar are added to so many things; it is really horrible. No wonder Americans are addicted to it. We have many new diagnoses and physical disorders stemming from the standard American Diet, the "improper diet", not to mention a rapid rise in obesity statistics and diagnosed diabetes. Americans love bread, gluten-free or not. Go to a restaurant and what is the first thing brought to the table? Bread! Can you imagine being brought some cut up cucumbers and celery instead? Now THAT would be a nice change! I often ask for this by the way and suggest you do as well. Kids products are the worst! To give a tiny or growing body with a rapidly developing brain that needs proper nutrition all that junk, additives and unhealthy ingredient are a crime. If your child has been having trouble focusing in school, I highly advise you to look at the ingredients list of the food and snacks he or she eats and check out the children's menu at a restaurant. Gluten-free foods as well. You may not have any issues with gluten and wheat type bread but it is harming your body in one way or another and I strongly advise you to stay away from it and keep your family off of it too. I also highly suggest you start being diligent and read your gluten-free product's ingredients list. Going gluten-free is the first step as a diagnosed celiac or one who is gluten intolerant, but getting healthier or staying healthy is of utmost importance to a long and healthy lifestyle. Your body's future is in your hands.
  8. 1-½ cups white rice flour ½ cup butter or margarine (cold) ½ teaspoon cream of tartar ½ cup sugar ½ teaspoon baking soda 1 egg (cold) 1-½ teaspoon xanthan gum ½ teaspoon gluten-free vanilla, lemon, or almond flavoring 1/8 teaspoon salt Combine the rice flour, cream of tartar, baking soda, xanthan gum and salt. Mix well. Cut in the butter or margarine until the mixture is in crumbs the size of peas. In a small bowl beat the sugar, egg, and vanilla (or other flavoring) together. Add this mixture to the dry ingredients and mix until the dough pulls away from the sides. Form the dough into a flat ball shape and refrigerate for one hour. Dust some freezer paper (not wax paper) with gluten-free flour or confectioners sugar. Put the dough on the freezer paper and sprinkle with flour or confectioners sugar. Roll the dough to ¼ inch thick and cut out shapes as desired. Bake at 350 degrees F for 12 minutes. Cool on a wire rack. Makes about 20 cookies. This recipe originally came from Mary Schluckebier, in the Fall 1994 issue of Lifeline, on page 15.
  9. A lot has happened since I last blogged. There are obivous reasons for me being tired; I have two kids under the age of 3, I'm a celiac, I've got hypoglycemia...yadda yadda. There are not so obvious reasons; chest pain at night, ache down the arm, lymphnodes swollen up neck (Cat scan confirmed), noduel on thyroid (cat scan confirmed), scar tissue in left cerebral hemisphere (MRI scan). My only concern is the swollen lymph nodes. The experience with lymph nodes was non hodgkins lymphoma. I seem to be an angry bear when I eat or drink sugary stuff. My neck seems to swell up more too. I get a head ache or migrane or am generally not with it. I had an frightening experience the other night, I don't know how it's related to the majority of the postings, but I woke up 2 hours after sleeping and the bone in my forearm was numb. The skin, the muscle was normal but the done inside was totally numb. The are ached real deep, so I just kept moving it like it were a normal numb foot or hand experience. After about a while it got better so I laid back down. I had been sleeping on my stomach with my head turned to one side. I don't normally sleep like that. So...my diet has changed based on those responses. I'm cutting the sugar way down. The sugar I get is from the Silk brand coconut milk (original flavor). I eat fruit, have organic gluten-free corn flake cereal. I'm just really wowing you now aren't I. lol I sure miss sugar. But it does not make me feel better. Not at all. I'm taking: gluten-free Women's NutriGold multi vitamins Swason's copper supplements with vegetable glaze (glaze keeps me from throwing them up) EnzymeScience Intolerance Complex Country Life's Ginseng Supreme Complex Vitamin K supplement when I need it *I need to have a regular exercise. It needs to be every week so that my system has time to work out junk in my lymphnodes. Drinking water and stressing out around the house or sitting on my rear doesn't flush the system like exercise does. Note: it is overwehlming to talk to doctors about my health history. They ask too many questions, I provide too much information. Makes for a depressing day for both people. There is no instant cure. It takes time, experience, knoweldge and lots of prayer. "Keep showing me Lord, I don't want to fall behind. You are my Great Healer, you'll get me there at the right time. Amen!" With more thought to this entry; I'm going to look up some various things that could be linked to the experiences with sugar and the arm bone falling asleep as well as my exhaustion. There is a possibility that I have leukemia. I'm appearing to have a majority of the symptoms except the blood test for white blood cell counts and the bone marrow test. I've had a bone marrow test back when I finished cancer treatments at the hospital, they warned me I would need to have a bone marrow transplant if I had to do chemo again. No thanks. I'd like to do what I can that is provided here on the earth and trust God for healing if He desires to heal me. There could be greater reason for me to suffer and bear my cross than just "find a cure! panic..." that's just futial. What's the purpose of a story that's helps educate others and build their faith if everyone found healing from mankind in the hospital? Hospitals have not always existed, neither have doctors. God has. So let's utilize His healing power and seriously show up this world's view of "cure".
  10. Connie Sarros

    Sweetening Without Sugar

    This article originally appeared in the Summer 2003 edition of Celiac.com's JournalofGluten-Sensitivity. Have you ever taken a bite of unsweetened chocolate? If you have, I’m sure your taste buds revolted! Sugar is what makes most of our desserts palatable and desirable. But sugar adds empty calories to the diet and little else nutritionally speaking. So how are you going to bake foods to satisfy your sweet tooth if you refrain from using refined sugar? There are always viable alternatives. Sucrose (a fancy word for sugar) usually encompasses the following: Brown Sugar: Much less refined than white sugar, is derived from molasses (sorghum cane) and contains very small amounts of minerals. Raw Sugar: May come in crystalline form that is very similar to brown sugar. Turbinado Sugar: Is partially refined sugar crystals that have been washed in steam. White Sugar: Derived from cane or beets, and no matter what form it takes, offers nothing but empty calories. First consider the less desirable sugar replacements: Maltose: Not a good option because it comes from the breakdown of starch in the process of malting grains, usually barley, so it is not always gluten-free. Corn syrup: A blend of fructose and dextrose; its effect on blood glucose is similar to that of sucrose. Dextrose: Usually made from plant starches, in the U.S. it is mostly made from corn, but can also be obtained by the inversion of cane sugar or sucrose. Honey: Derived from flowers where bees have collected nectar, is a more concentrated form of carbohydrate than table sugar, and is converted to glucose in the body. It is only slightly better for you that refined sugar. If you are using honey to replace sugar, for 1 cup sugar, substitute ¾ cup honey; reduce liquid in recipe by 2 Tablespoons, and add ¼ teaspoon baking soda. If you still opt to use refined sugar, in most recipes you may reduce the amount of sugar called for without any noticeable effects on the finished product. There are several “sugars” on the market that do not have the negative effects of refined sugar: Date Sugar: Derived from dates, it is not as sweet as sucrose but has far more nutritional value. For 1 cup sugar, use 2/3 cup date sugar and add a little water to form thick syrup. Fresh or Dried Fruits: Offer a natural sweetness and can be used in baking to reduce the amount of refined sugar used. Fruit Juice Concentrates: While high in sugary taste, have nutritional value not found in sucrose. Fructose: Sweeter than any other sugar in equal amounts, comes from fruits and honey. Because of its concentration much less of this sweetener is needed in recipes. Invert Sugar: A mixture of equal parts of glucose and fructose resulting from the hydrolysis of sucrose. It is found naturally in fruits and honey and produced artificially for use in the food industry. It is sweeter than sucrose, so the amount used may be lessened, and it helps baked goods stay fresh longer. Molasses: A thick syrup produced in refining raw sugar and ranging from light to dark brown in color. Maple Syrup/Sugar: Both made from the sap of maple trees. For 1cup sugar, use ¾ cup maple syrup or maple sugar. Stevia Sugar: Fairly new on the market this extract from the stevia leaf is combined with a pre-biotic nutritional supplement and is ten times sweeter than sugar. It has a glycemic index of zero, and is nutritionally beneficial. For 1cup sugar, use 2 Tablespoons stevia. Unsweetened Coconut: When toasted the natural oils in coconut are exuded adding sweetness to a baked product. Unsweetened Applesauce: When added to a cake or bread batter it adds sweetness, flavor, moistness and nutrition. Experiment until you find a sugar substitute that you enjoy, and one that works well with your recipes.Pineapple Sticks Ingredients: 2 cups gluten-free flour mixture 3 Tablespoons stevia ½ teaspoon salt ¾ teaspoon cinnamon ½ teaspoon gluten-free baking powder ¾ cup MF/gluten-free margarine ¾ teaspoon vanilla ¾ teaspoon lemon juice 6 Tablespoons water 1/3 cup all-fruit pineapple jamCorn-free diets: Omit cornstarch from gluten-free flour mixture. Use CF vanilla. Use baking soda in place of the baking powder. Use butter in place of the margarine. Omit nonstick spray; use olive oil to brush baking sheet. Rice-free diets: Omit rice flour from gluten-free flour mixture Soy-free diets: Use butter in place of margarine. Omit nonstick spray; use oil to brush baking sheet. Directions: Over a bowl, sift together flour mixture, fructose, salt, cinnamon and baking powder. Cut in margarine until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Sprinkle vanilla, lemon juice and 2 Tablespoons water over flour mixture; toss with a fork. Continue adding water, 1 tablespoon at a time, and tossing until mixture is evenly moistened. Form into a ball, cover, and refrigerate for 1 hour. Divide dough into 4 even pieces. Roll 1 piece into a 12 X 4 inch rectangle; spread with half of the jam. Roll the second piece into a 12 X 4 inch triangle; gently lift dough and place over jam. Repeat with remaining 2 pieces of dough and remaining jam. Trim edges. Cut each rectangle into 12 one-inch strips. Twist each strip, pinching ends to seal. Place on a baking sheet that has been lightly sprayed with gluten-free nonstick spray. Bake at 375F degrees for 20 minutes or until lightly browned. Yield: 24 cookies. Note: For variety, use apricot or black raspberry jam in place of the pineapple jam. Calories (per cookie): 83; Total fat: 4.4g; Saturated fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 121.4mg; Carbohydrates: 10.1g; Fiber: 0.3g; Sugar: 2.8g; Protein: 3g
  11. A little background, I cannot tolerate artifical sweeteners like those in diet drinks and candies. They upset my stomach very badly. I am seeing Stevia pop up in certain foods and I'm wondering 1) if it is generally considered safe for celiacs and 2) if it is like regular sugar as far as effects on the body and digestion. I have no problem with regular cane sugar but I'm allergic to corn (ie corn syrup) and I can't do anything artificial. From what I've read Stevia isn't artificial but I can't really tell anything else about it other than that. Thanks for any help!
  12. This recipe is exactly what you've been looking for as a fun, interactive and TOTALLY yummy cookie, any time of year. My kids and I change the food coloring, depending on the season: orange (Halloween and Thanksgiving); red or green (Christmas); blue (Chanukah/Hanukah); red (Valentine's Day); green (St. Patrick's Day); pink, blue or green (Easter/Spring); red, white or blue (July 4) ... ok, you get the idea! I love to use this dough at kids' cooking classes I teach, as it's totally resilient and can stand up to any amount of rolling out and cutting, re-rolling and cutting, .... and it's always delicious. Have fun and happy (any) holiday! Ingredients: ¼ cup shortening (e.g. Earth Balance) ¼ cup canola oil 2/3 cup granulated cane sugar 2 egg yolks 2 tsp. gluten-free vanilla extract 1 ¾ cup Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour* ½ tsp. salt 3 Tbs. water (as needed) food coloring (optional) colored sugar or frosting (optional – see below) *See my bio (top right). Directions: Cream shortening, sugar and oil several minutes with an electric mixer, until very fluffy. Add egg yolks, vanilla extract and food coloring. Mix in the dry ingredients, adding in tablespoons of water as needed to keep the dough together and avoid dryness (err on the side of this dough being wetter so that after refrigeration, it's not too dry). Pat the dough into a disc shape, cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate the dough until very cold, at least 3-5 hours (overnight is best). Preheat oven to 350 F (static) or 325 F (convection). Lightly flour a clean rolling surface with Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour. Roll the dough to approximately 1/8 inch thickness and dust cookie cutters with flour before using to cut out shapes. You may also roll thin coils of dough of different colors and braid into candy cane or other fun shapes. Place cookies onto parchment-lined (or greased) cookie sheets and decorate with colored sugar, if desired. Bake approximately 8-10 minutes, or until they begin to lightly brown at the edges. Cool on a cooling rack and frost with gluten-free frosting, if desired. Basic (but yummy) Frosting This frosting works wonderfully for cookies or cakes, made chocolate or vanilla or any other flavor you can devise. It is fast, easy, cheap and has always been gluten-free. Enjoy! Ingredients: 1 cup sifted confectioner's sugar ½ tsp. vanilla extract (may use peppermint, orange, almond or other extract in the alternative) Milk (dairy or non-dairy), fruit juice, liqueur 2 Tbs. unsweetened cocoa powder (only if making chocolate frosting) pinch of salt Directions: Whisk together the sugar (and cocoa if using), extract and liquid by gradually adding the liquid, a teaspoon or so at a time. Continue adding liquid until the frosting is the consistency you need for your dessert. The thinner the frosting, the better if you are drizzling it over a cake or cookie; the thicker it is, the better if you want to have a firmer coating.
  13. Here's my tasty Gluten-Free Sugar Cookie Recipe just in time for the holidays. Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free and Vegan Sugar Cookies Ingredients: 2 cups all purpose gluten free flour 1 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp. sea salt 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 1/4 tsp. nutmeg 1/2 cup Earth Balance Vegan Butter Sticks, softened 1 cup sugar or sugar substitute such as Stevia Egg Substitute for 1 large egg 2 tsp. almond extract 1/4 cup almond milk Instructions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. In a small bowl, combine flour, baking soda, sea salt, cinnamon and nutmeg. In a separate bowl, beat butter and sugar until creamy, then add egg substitute, almond extract and almond milk; mix well. Add flour mixture to the wet mixture; mix well. Scoop dough into balls. Place 2 inches apart on a cookie sheet. Bake for 12 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from oven; set aside to cool for 5 minutes before serving.
  14. Sweet Baby Cakes has come up with some of the best gluten-free brownies we've ever tried. Their traditional Chocolate Fudge Brownie is a brownie lover's delight. Made from chocolate syrup, black bean flour and flax meal, this brownie tastes as good as it looks. The brownie is chewy and sweetened with agave, but it is not so sweet that you can't eat the whole brownie in one sitting! These brownies are also ready to eat from the freezer, which means you don't have to thaw or microwave them before eating. For more information, visit their website. Review written by Patricia Seeley.
  15. 3 cups gluten-free flour mix* 2 eggs 1 teaspoon soda 1 cup sugar 1 teaspoon cream of tartar 1 teaspoon almond (or flavoring of your choice) 1 cup gluten-free margarine Sift flour, soda & cream of tartar - cut in margarine or butter (I find that margarine is easier when rolling out the cookies). Beat eggs, add sugar & almond - mix well. Pour egg mixture into flour mixture and mix well by hand. Chill at least 15 min (several days is also ok). Roll out to desired thickness on floured surface and cut into shapes. Decorate with colored sugar, or if you prefer, after baked & cooled frost and then sprinkle with colored sugar, etc. 2 cups powdered sugar mixed with some melted butter & lemon juice frosts one batch. Bake at 350F for 9 minutes. * Bette Hagman's Four Flour Mix (from The Gluten-Free Gourmet Bakes Bread). Garfava Bean Flour 2/3 part Sorghum Flour 1/3 part Cornstarch 1 part Tapioca Flour 1 part
  16. Celiac.com 04/04/2011 - Having been diagnosed with celiac disease, I know from having to follow a strict gluten-free diet that monitoring one's diet and health can be inconvenient, time-consuming, and challenging. Similarly, keeping one's blood sugar level under control for diabetics can be tough, but studies are showing how important this is, as it has been shown to prevent diabetic neuropathy, that is, nerve damage peculiar to diabetics, and its devastating effects. According to Tedd Mitchell, M.D., President of the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, there are two types of diabetic neuropathy, peripheral and autonomic. Peripheral neuropathy is "a degeneration of the nerves in the feet and hands," according to Dr. Mitchell, which, as it occurs "slowly but progressively," reduces sensitivity to touch while heightening sensations of pain and itching. The second type is autonomic neuropathy, which is, Dr. Mitchell says, "damage to nerves that control bodily functions, such as digestion, urination, heart rate, blood pressure, sexual function and even sweating." Some of the symptoms of this type are digestive problems, urinary problems, and reductions in blood pressure. The longer one has been diabetic, the higher one's risk for neuropathy. Thankfully, evidence supports that long-term blood sugar control can reduce this risk. It may seem like a challenge for some diabetics to control their blood sugar, but with some determination and effort, it can successfully be achieved. MedicalMoment.org, a website developed by Columbia St. Mary's, an organization of hospitals and clinics, offers various ways to get started controlling your blood sugar. First, in liaison with your health care provider, test your blood sugar and keep a record of your results and pertinent information, on a daily basis. Follow your doctor's prescribed diabetes medicine plan while eating foods low in fat, sugar, and sodium and high in fiber on a regular basis, aiming for the same caloric intake every day. It's important to get regular exercise, starting slowly if need be, such as swimming and walking. Your diet and exercise routine should be geared toward maintaining your ideal weight, which should be determined by your health care provider. You'll want to stay aware of signs of possible nerve damage such as sores that won't heal, blisters, swelling, and ulcers. MedicalMoment.org also offers several tips for keeping blood sugar under control. Low blood sugar should be treated quickly with the use of special glucose gel or tablets. Smoking, which harms the heart and the circulatory system, should be avoided. Next, learn as much as possible about your diabetic condition and treatment; knowledge is power in this case, as I know from being a celiac disease patient. Lastly, avoid stress and get support by staying connected with friends and relatives or a support group who can help you keep your blood sugar under control. It isn't unusual for me to focus some of my work as an author, researcher, and gluten-free and health advocate, on the area of diabetes; after all, according to Celiac.com, evidence is growing which supports that people with Type 1 diabetes are at high risk for celiac disease. In this research, the necessity of maintaining blood sugar is clear. With the help of your medical practitioner and other resources, you can achieve proper self-care in controlling blood sugar level and lower this risk of nerve damage. Resource: Mitchell, Dr. Tedd. "Nerve damage: One more reason to keep blood sugar under control." USA Weekend: July 9-11, 2010.
  17. Finding a good gluten free ice cream cone turned out to be a real obstacle for me. Either they held up well, but tasted like cardboard, or they had a good flavor but were extremely brittle. I almost gave up on my search for a great gluten-free cone, but then I tried Joy's Gluten-free Sugar Ice Cream Cones. Joy Cones have such a nice crisp texture and are strong enough to hold up to my eight-year-old's scooping skills. Not to mention that they taste amazing! I even catch my non-celiac kids dipping into my stash. For more info visit their site: http://www.joycone.com. Note:Articles thatappearin the "Gluten-Free Food & SpecialtyProduct Companies" section ofthis site are paid advertisements. Formoreinformation about this seeour AdvertisingPage.
  18. This recipe comes to us from Lucy Shriver at the Gluten Free Kitchen. 1 ½ cups brown rice flour ½ cup tapioca starch ½ Teaspoon Salt 1 Teaspoon Baking Powder 1 Teaspoon Vanilla 1 Cup Sugar ½ Cup Butter, Softened 2 Eggs, beaten In a medium size bowl, mix brown rice flour, tapioca starch, salt, and baking powder. Blend well and set aside. In a mixing bowl, cream Butter, and slowly add sugar and cream until light and fluffy. Add the two beaten Eggs and Vanilla and blend again. Add Flour mixture and mix until mixture pulls away from the side of the bowl. Place cookie dough in waxed paper ( I rolled it like a log) and chill in the refrigerator for several hours. When the dough is chilled, you can either cut it with cookie cutters or slice it to make round cookies. Bake on an un-greased cookie sheet at 350 degrees. I have found that with gluten free cookies, it is better to let them cool first, before taking off of the cookie sheet. This reduces crumbling. I also use a spatula, to remove the cookies from the pan. I made Witch Hats out of mine. I cut into a round cookie shape. (used a knife and cut about a ½ inch of dough and placed on cookie sheet). When cookies are done, let cool, and then remove from pan with spatula. Spread your favorite gluten-free chocolate frosting on each cookie, place a Hersheys kiss in the middle and then with a orange colored frosting, you can decorate around the base of the Hersheys kiss, to make it resemble a hat band. If you need a icing recipe, please e-mail me and I will be happy to mail them. ( I use a butter cream icing.).
  19. This recipe comes to us from Ryan Blokzyl. Ingredients: 2/3 cup shortening ¾ cup sugar ½ teaspoon vanilla 1 egg 4 teaspoons milk 2 cups gluten free flour (see below *) 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder ¼ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon xanthan gum Directions: Cream first 3 ingredients, then add egg and beat until light and fluffy. Stir in milk. Stir together dry ingredients and blend into creamed mixture. Divide dough in half and chill for one hour. Roll (slightly thick) out on lightly gluten free flour surface (You may need a little gluten free flour on the rolling pin if it sticks). Bake on greased cookie sheet 6-8 minutes at 375F (I used parchment paper and just pulled off the parchment paper and let them cool on the parchment paper on a cooling rack). * Be careful as the cookies are fragile when warm. Topping: I melted a chunk of white chocolate for the frosting and it worked out nicely and then sprinkled with red and green sugar. I think Pillsbury cream cheese frosting is gluten-free, and if so would work well. Gluten-Free Flour Mix: You can use any all purpose gluten free flour mix, but I used Bette Hagman’s flour blend: 2 cups white rice flour 2/3 cup potato starch 1/3 cup tapioca flour Mix the flour and store extra in an airtight container in the refrigerator for future use.
  20. I recently had the opportunity to try a gluten-free, sugar-free and starch-free cookie called "Cocoa-licious," which is manufactured by “Yes! To cookies.” I have to be honest when I asked myself, “how good can a gluten, carb and sugar free cookie taste?” When I opened the package, the smell of rich cocoa spilled out, and I discovered that each cookie was topped with a type of glaze that made it appealing to the eye as well. I no longer found myself hesitant to try these cookies, and now I'm glad that I did. Each cookie was soft, moist and had a rich cocoa flavor. I did notice a slight aftertaste which I can only best describe as the same type of taste I get after I take a vitamin, but due to their uniqueness, I have to give these Cocoa-licious cookies a thumbs up. I had no idea that there was such a thing as a sugar, carb and gluten-free cookie, but I can say that this cookie far exceeded my expectations. It would be a great gluten-free snack for anyone who is watching their carbohydrate and sugar intake, and would satisfy a craving for something sweet. For more info visit their site: yestocookies.com Note:Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Product Reviews" section of this site are paidadvertisements. For more information about this seeour Advertising Page.
  21. The first thing you will notice about gluten-free cookies made by Beautifulsweets.com, is that they really are amazingly beautiful. The packaging is gorgeous, and each cookie looks like a work of art. Valentine’s Day is fast approaching, and you won’t find a better gluten-free Valentine’s Day gift than these wonderful heart-shaped gluten-free sugar cookies. They taste much like a traditional sugar cookie, with a twist of lemon! These beautifully decorated cookies taste very much how they look, and I think that anyone would be impressed if they received a box of them on Valentine’s Day. For more information visit: www.BeautifulSweets.com. Note: Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Product Reviews" section ofthis site are paid advertisements. For more information about this seeour Advertising Page.
  22. ¼ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon nutmeg 2 eggs ¼ teaspoon cloves ½ cup sugar ¼ cup margarine, melted 2/3 cup gluten-free flour mix** 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¾ teaspoon baking powder Combine the salt and eggs in a medium bowl, and beat with a mixer at high speed until foamy. Gradually add in the sugar, beating constantly until the mixture is thick and pale (about 5 minutes). Mix the flour and spices in a bowl and stir well. Gradually fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture. Gradually fold in the margarine and vanilla. Coat a madeleine pan with gluten-free cooking spray. Spoon about 1 Tablespoon of the mixture into each madeleine form. (Instead of a madeleine pan you may use a muffin pan, mini muffin pan, muffin top pan, etc. filled not quite half full. The batter simply needs something to hold its shape.) Bake at 400 degrees F for 8 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove the madeleines from the pan using the tip of a knife. Let them cool completely on a wire rack. Sprinkle with powdered sugar. Makes about 2 dozen. This recipe comes to us from Joan Kulka. Note: For the rice flour in the gluten-free flour mix, Joan uses equal portions of sweet rice flour (like Mochiko) and oriental rice flour. ** gluten-free flour mix: 6 cups white rice flour 2 cups potato starch (NOT the same as potato flour) 1 cup tapioca starch (also called tapioca flour)
  23. This recipe comes to us from Mary Thorpe. 2 cups cornstarch 1 cup sugar 1 egg ½ tsp salt 1 ½ sticks of unsalted butter (that equals 12 tablespoons) Preheat oven to 375° F. Sift cornstarch, sugar and salt together, mix the egg and blend in the butter. Knead well. Let stand ten to fifteen minutes. I use a cookie press to drop them on a greased cookie sheet. It makes cookies in different shapes. But usually you shape them into balls in the palm of your hand and drop them on the greased cookie sheet. Then use the tines on a fork to make grooves on the cookies. They look really pretty that way. Some people like to shape the cookies into really tiny balls, others prefer them bigger. Bake for about seven minutes, depending on how big you make them. Let cool and serve with a wonderful cup of Brazilian coffee in the afternoon. When I made them, I used salted butter and left out the extra salt. I experimented with different forms by rolling them out on a sheet (lightly floured with corn starch) and cutting them with a cookie cutter. They make great rolled cookies because you can re-roll the scraps without the dough getting tough. They came out fine - not too fragile once cooled. You can also roll them into balls and flattened with a fork, which makes a plump little cookie, or you can roll them into balls and flatten them with the bottom of a glass dipped in sugar (thats the classic way I used to make sugar cookies). I have also rolled them out to ¼ inch thickness in the bottom of a spring form pan (one with a smooth surface, not bumpy like many are). The rolling pin went right across the top making an even thickness. When cooked (this took about 15 minutes) I cut into squares (the ones on the edges turn into triangles) and let cool. This was the easiest and best way that I tried so far.
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